Revolution [NOOK Book]

Overview

Readers of If I Stay and Elizabeth George will love Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly, author of the award-winning novel A Northern Light. Revolution artfully weaves two girls’ stories into one unforgettable account of life, loss, and enduring love; it spans centuries and vividly depicts the eternal struggles of the human heart.

BROOKLYN: Andi Alpers is on the edge. She’s angry at her father for leaving, angry at her mother for not being able to...
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Revolution

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Overview

Readers of If I Stay and Elizabeth George will love Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly, author of the award-winning novel A Northern Light. Revolution artfully weaves two girls’ stories into one unforgettable account of life, loss, and enduring love; it spans centuries and vividly depicts the eternal struggles of the human heart.

BROOKLYN: Andi Alpers is on the edge. She’s angry at her father for leaving, angry at her mother for not being able to cope, and heartbroken by the loss of her younger brother, Truman. Rage and grief are destroying her. And she’s about to be expelled from Brooklyn Heights’ most prestigious private school when her father intervenes. Now Andi must accompany him to Paris for winter break.
 
PARIS: Alexandrine Paradis lived over two centuries ago. She dreamed of making her mark on the Paris stage, but a fateful encounter with a doomed prince of France cast her in a tragic role she didn’t want—and couldn’t escape.
 
Two girls, two centuries apart. One never knowing the other. But when Andi finds Alexandrine’s diary, she recognizes something in her words and is moved to the point of obsession. There’s comfort and distraction for Andi in the journal’s antique pages—until, on a midnight journey through the catacombs of Paris, Alexandrine’s words transcend paper and time, and the past becomes suddenly, terrifyingly present.

Praise for Revolution:

An ABA Indies Choice Young Adult Book of the Year
An ALA-YALSA Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults
A Kirkus Reviews Best Book
#1 Indiebound pick for fall 2010
A School Library Journal Best Book
A Bulletin Blue Ribbon Book
A Chicago Public Library Best of the Best Book
Amazon.com Best Book of the Year

[STAR] "A sumptuous feast of a novel, rich in mood, character, and emotion."--School Library Journal, Starred

[STAR] "Every detail is meticulously inscribed into a multi-layered narrative that is as wise, honest, and moving as it is cunningly worked. Readers  . . . will find this brilliantly crafted work utterly absorbing."--The Bulletin, Starred

[STAR] "Brilliantly realized, complete, and complex. The novel is rich with detail, and both the Brooklyn and Paris settings provide important grounding for the haunting and beautifully told story."--Kirkus Reviews, Starred



From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Two girls, two centuries and an ocean apart, are thrust together in this gripping novel by the award-winning author of A Northern Light. Brooklyn high school student Andi Alpers feels at the end of several tethers when her father rescues her for a winter break excursion to France. When the ever-curious Andi discovers the ragged journal of an ill-fated Parisian actress, she falls under its thrall. When that emotional connection jolts into the presence, Alpers matures in sudden, unexpected ways.

Publishers Weekly
Donnelly (A Northern Light) melds contemporary teen drama with well-researched historical fiction and a dollop of time travel for a hefty read that mostly succeeds. Andi Alpers is popping antidepressants and flunking out of her Brooklyn prep school, grieving over her younger brother's death. She finds solace only when playing guitar. When the school notifies her mostly absent scientist father that she's flirting with expulsion, he takes Andi to Paris for Christmas break, where he's testing DNA to see if a preserved heart really belonged to the doomed son of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. Andi is ordered to work on her senior thesis about a (fictional) French composer. Bunking at the home of a renowned historian, Andi finds a diary that relates the last days of Alexandrine, companion to (you guessed it) the doomed prince. The story then alternates between Andi's suicidal urges and Alexandrine's efforts to save the prince. Donnelly's story goes on too long, but packs in worthy stuff. Musicians, especially, will appreciate the thread about the debt rock owes to the classics. Ages 14–up. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
WINNER - 2011 Young Adult Book of the Year - American Booksellers Association
An ALA-YALSA Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults
A Kirkus Reviews Best Book
#1 Indiebound Pick for Fall 2010
A School Library Journal Best Book
A Bulletin Blue Ribbon Book
A Chicago Public Library Best of the Best Book
Amazon.com Best Book of the Year

[STAR] “Andi Alpers, a 17-year-old music lover, is about to be expelled from her elite private school. Despite her brilliance, she has not been able to focus on anything except music since the death of her younger brother, which pushed the difficulties in her family to the breaking point. She resists accompanying her work-obsessed father to Paris, especially after he places her mentally fragile mother in a hospital, but once there works in earnest on her senior thesis about an 18th-century French musician. But when she finds the 200-year-old diary of another teen, Alexandrine Paradis, she is plunged into the chaos of the French Revolution. Soon, Alex’s life and struggles become as real and as painful for Andi as her own troubled life. Printz Honor winner Donnelly combines compelling historical fiction with a frank contemporary story. Andi is brilliantly realized, complete and complex. The novel is rich with detail, and both the Brooklyn and Paris settings provide important grounding for the haunting and beautifully told story.”
-Kirkus Reviews, Starred

[STAR] “Every detail is meticulously inscribed into a multi-layered narrative that is as wise, honest, and moving as it is cunningly worked…The interplay between the contemporary and the historical is seamless in both plot and theme, and the storytelling grips hard and doesn’t let go. Readers fascinated with French history, the power of music, and/or contemporary realist fiction will find this brilliantly crafted work utterly absorbing.”
-The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, Starred

[STAR] "Andi Alpers’s younger brother died two years ago and his death has torn her family apart. She’s on antidepressants and is about to flunk out of her prep school. Her mother spends all day painting portraits of her lost son and her father has all but disappeared, focusing on his Nobel Prize-winning genetics work. He reappears suddenly at the beginning of winter break to institutionalize his wife and whisk Andi off to Paris with him. There he will be conducting genetic tests on a heart rumored to belong to the last dauphin of France. He hopes that Andi will be able to put in some serious work on her senior thesis regarding mysterious 18th-century guitarist Amadé Malherbeau. In Paris, Andi finds a lost diary of Alexandrine Paradis, companion to the dauphin, and meets Virgil, a hot Tunisian-French world-beat hip-hop artist. Donnelly’s story of Andi’s present life with her intriguing research and growing connection to Virgil overshadowed by depression is layered with Alexandrine’s quest, first to advance herself and later to somehow save the prince from the terrors of the French Revolution. While teens may search in vain for the music of the apparently fictional Malherbeau, many will have their interest piqued by the connections Donnelly makes between classical musicians and modern artists from Led Zeppelin to Radiohead. Revolution is a sumptuous feast of a novel, rich in mood, character, and emotion. With multiple hooks, it should appeal to a wide range of readers."
-School Library Journal, Starred

“…sharply articulated, raw emotions and insights into science and art; ambition and love; history’s ever-present influence; and music’s immediate, astonishing power…”
-Booklist

"Even kids who don’t usually like historical fiction won’t be able to put Revolution down, especially given its great modern-day story."
-PublishersWeekly.com

"Before the book is done ... we'll have taken a long strange trip of our own in Andi's company: back and forth between present-tense Andi and past-tense Alexandrine, between contemporary Paris and the filthy, terrorized streets of Robespierre's day, and deep into the clammy, bone-filled catacombs that underlie the city and where, in this ... memorable novel, past and present connect in a frightening, disorienting fashion."
-The Wall Street Journal
 
"As in her previous novel for young adults, the award-winning A Northern Light, Jennifer Donnelly combines impeccable historical research with lively, fully fashioned characters to create an indelible narrative. Revolution is a complex story, moving back and forth in time and including allusions not only to historical events but also to literature (especially Dante’s Divine Comedy) and to music from Handel to Wagner to Radiohead. Yet this undeniably cerebral book is also simultaneously wise and achingly poignant."
-BookPage.com

“This beautiful and complicated story effortlessly blends history, romance, music and tragedy into a must-read about two girls who connect across centuries.”
-Justine Magazine

"I could say that I recommend Revolution to lovers of music and historical fiction (which I do), but that is not enough. The story is an impressive blend of contemporary fiction and historical fiction, with heart-wrenching character development."
-LoveYALit.com

"Revolution is an exciting foray into history, music and grief. It's a melodic story of love and friendship—of bonds that tie time together.”
-The Daily Monacle (blog)

"Rich and ambitious...Beautifully written and thoroughly researched."-The Guardian (UK)

From the Hardcover edition.

Children's Literature - Jennifer Lehmann
Andi Alpers doesn't expect to be saved by a girl who'd lived two centuries ago. She expects to fall apart completely. Her little brother is dead. Her mother is going crazy. She has stopped caring about her schoolwork and may not graduate. Even her music is not holding back the pain anymore. Her father finally learns of the severity of the situation and steps in to hospitalize her mother and take Andi to Paris with him. He is in France to confirm whether a child's heart is the heart of the son of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, who died walled up in a tower during the French Revolution. Andi is there to work on her senior thesis, but finds the journal of Alexandrine Paradis. Alex was an actress who became the companion of the young prince. Her journal pulls Andi into the devastating world of the Revolution and both brings her to the depths of her depression and gives her lasting hope. Readers unfamiliar with the over-medicated and under-supervised world of the New York upper class may find the first chapters difficult to identify with, but once Andi arrives in France, the setting, both in the present and in the journal, becomes as real and as vibrant as the characters. Both Andi and Alex tell their stories in the first person, and Donnelly has done a masterful job of creating two distinct voices, yet intertwining them seamlessly and making each story gripping. The surrounding characters add dimensions to Andi's life, with humor from her best friend Vijay and the spark of love interest from Virgil, a hot French rapper. Revolution combines the best aspects of modern young adult fiction with unique insight into the brutal effects of the French Revolution. Reviewer: Jennifer Lehmann
VOYA - Marlyn Beebe
The book begins with Andi and some of her classmates at the weekly Friday morning breakfast party, where each gets high in her or his own way before heading to school. Oh, no! Not another teen-angst tale! While it is that, it is so much more. Andi Alpers is a senior at St. Anselm's, a prestigious private school in Brooklyn, New York. Her seven-year-old brother, Truman, was killed in a traffic accident two years earlier, and Andi blames herself because she was supposed to be looking after him. She lives with her artist mother in an apartment, and her father, a Nobel-prize-winning geneticist who left after his son's death, is now involved with a much younger woman. Andi's grades have slipped in all her classes except music, which, along with antidepressants, is her escape. She has managed to keep her academic and emotional problems from her mother, who is suffering in her own way, continually painting portraits of Truman. Andi arrives home one evening to find her father waiting for her. He has his wife admitted to a psychiatric hospital and informs Andi that she will be accompanying him to Paris for her winter break and working on the outline for her senior thesis. In Paris, Andi is given an old guitar wich contains diary that belonged to Alexandrine Paradis, daughter of a family of entertainers. As Andi becomes engrossed in the diary, she becomes more and more interested not only in doing research for her thesis about an eighteenth-century French composer named Amade Malherbeau but also in a young French musician she meets in a club. This relatively hefty volume might not work for the readers of Lurlene McDaniel, but give it to those who love Gregory Maguire or Libba Bray. Reviewer: Marlyn Beebe
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—Andi Alpers is from Brooklyn Heights, NY, and is trying to come to terms with her scientist father's abandonment, her mother's mental illness, and her bother's tragic death which caused it all. About to be expelled from her private school, Andi's father demands that she accompany him to Paris to work on her senior thesis about an 18th-century French musician which she has been neglecting while he conducts tests on a heart that might have belonged to the last dauphin of France. Andi discovers a 200-year-old diary written by Alexandrine Paradis during the French Revolution. Combining contemporary teen problems with history and adding a dash of romance and time travel, the audiobook format is perfect for Jennifer Donnelly's novel (Delacorte, 2010), a 2011 Odyssey Award Honor selection. Emily Card's voicing of Andi has just the right amount of anguish, angst, and attitude. Emma Bering voices Alexandrine Paradis's emotions and French accent perfectly. Donnelly's incredibly descriptive text and the excellent narration create a vivid picture for patient listeners who can handle a lengthy, complex story.—Shari Fesko, Southfield Public Library, MI
Kirkus Reviews

Andi Alpers, a 17-year-old music lover, is about to be expelled from her elite private school. Despite her brilliance, she has not been able to focus on anything except music since the death of her younger brother, which pushed the difficulties in her family to the breaking point. She resists accompanying her work-obsessed father to Paris, especially after he places her mentally fragile mother in a hospital, but once there works in earnest on her senior thesis about an 18th-century French musician. But when she finds the 200-year-old diary of another teen, Alexandrine Paradis, she is plunged into the chaos of the French Revolution. Soon, Alex's life and struggles become as real and as painful for Andi as her own troubled life. Printz Honor winner Donnelly combines compelling historical fiction with a frank contemporary story. Andi is brilliantly realized, complete and complex. The novel is rich with detail, and both the Brooklyn and Paris settings provide important grounding for the haunting and beautifully told story. (Fiction. 14 & up)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375897603
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 10/12/2010
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 62,989
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Jennifer Donnelly
Jennifer Donnelly is the author of three adult novels, The Tea Rose, The Winter Rose, and The Wild Rose, as well as the young adult novel A Northern Light, winner of Britain’s prestigious Carnegie Medal, the L.A. Times Book Prize for Young Adult Literature, and a Michael L. Printz Honor Award. She lives and writes full-time in upstate New York. You can visit her at www.jenniferdonnelly.com.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Read an Excerpt

Those who can, do.

Those who can't, deejay.

Like Cooper van Epp. Standing in his room--the entire fifth floor of a Hicks Street brownstone--trying to beat-match John Lee Hooker with some piece of trip-hop horror. On twenty thousand dollars' worth of equipment he doesn't know how to use.

"This is the blues, man!" he crows. "It's Memphis mod." He pauses to pour himself his second scotch of the morning. "It's like then and now. Brooklyn and Beale Street all at once. It's like hanging at a house party with John Lee. Smoking Kents and drinking bourbon for breakfast. All that's missing, all we need--"

"--are hunger, disease, and a total lack of economic opportunity," I say.

Cooper pushes his porkpie back on his head and brays laughter. He's wearing a wifebeater and an old suit vest. He's seventeen, white as cream and twice as rich, trying to look like a bluesman from the Mississippi Delta. He doesn't. He looks like Norton from The Honeymooners.

"Poverty, Coop," I add. "That's what you need. That's where the blues come from. But that's going to be hard for you. I mean, son of a hedge fund god and all."

His idiot grin fades. "Man, Andi, why you always harshing me? Why you always so--"

Simone Canovas, a diplomat's daughter, cuts him off. "Oh, don't bother, Cooper. You know why."

"We all do. It's getting boring," says Arden Tode, a movie star's kid.

"And one last thing," I say, ignoring them, "talent. You need talent. Because John Lee Hooker had boatloads of it. Do you actually write any music, Coop? Do you play any? Or do you just stick other people's stuff together and call the resulting calamity your own?"

Cooper's eyes harden. His mouth twitches. "You're battery acid. You know that?"

"I do."

I am. No doubt about it. I like humiliating Cooper. I like causing him pain. It feels good. It feels better than his dad's whiskey, better than his mom's weed. Because for just a few seconds, someone else hurts, too. For just a few seconds, I'm not alone.

I pick up my guitar and play the first notes of Hooker's "Boom Boom." Badly, but it does the trick. Cooper swears at me and storms off.

Simone glares. "That was brutal, Andi. He's a fragile soul," she says; then she takes off after him. Arden takes off after her.

Simone doesn't give a rat's about Cooper or his soul. She's only worried he'll pull the plug on our Friday-morning breakfast party. She never faces school without a buzz. Nobody does. We need to have something, some kind of substance-fueled force field to fend off the heavy hand of expectation that threatens to crush us like beer cans the minute we set foot in the place.

I quit playing "Boom Boom" and ease into "Tupelo." No one pays any attention. Not Cooper's parents, who are in Cabo for the holidays. Not the maid, who's running around opening windows to let the smoke out. And not my classmates, who are busy trading iPods back and forth, listening to one song after another. No Billboard Hot 100 fare for us. We're better than that. Those tunes are for kids at P.S. Whatever-the-hell. We attend St. Anselm's, Brooklyn's most prestigious private school. We're special. Exceptional. We're supernovas, every single one of us. That's what our teachers say, and what our parents pay thirty thousand dollars a year to hear.

This year, senior year, it's all about the blues. And William Burroughs, Balkan soul, German countertenors, Japanese girl bands, and New Wave. It's calculated, the mix. Like everything else we do. The more obscure our tastes, the greater the proof of our genius.

As I sit here mangling "Tupelo," I catch broken-off bits of conversation going on around me.

"But really, you can't even approach Flock of Seagulls without getting caught up in the metafictive paradigm," somebody says.

And "Plastic Bertrand can, I think, best be understood as a postironic nihilist referentialist."

And "But, like, New Wave derived meaning from its own meaninglessness. Dude, the tautology was so intended."

And then, "Wasn't that a mighty time, wasn't that a mighty time . . ."

I look up. The kid singing lines from "Tupelo," a notorious horndog from Slater, another Heights school, is suddenly sitting on the far end of the sofa I'm sitting on. He smirks his way over until our knees are touching.

"You're good," he says.

"Thanks."

"You in a band?"

I keep playing, head down, so he takes a bolder tack.

"What's this?" he says, leaning over to tug on the red ribbon I wear around my neck. At the end of it is a silver key. "Key to your heart?"

I want to kill him for touching it. I want to say words that will slice him to bits, but I have none. They dry up in my throat. I can't speak, so I hold up my hand, the one covered in skull rings, and clench it into a fist.

He drops the key. "Hey, sorry."

"Don't do that," I tell him, tucking it back inside my shirt. "Ever."

"Okay, okay. Take it easy, psycho," he says, backing off.

I put the guitar into its case and head for an exit. Front door. Back door. Window. Anything. When I'm halfway across the living room, I feel a hand close on my arm.

"Come on. It's eight-fifteen."

It's Vijay Gupta. President of the Honor Society, the debate team, the Chess Club, and the Model United Nations. Volunteer at a soup kitchen, a literacy center, and the ASPCA. Davidson Fellow, Presidential Scholar candidate, winner of a Princeton University poetry prize, but, alas, not a cancer survivor.

Orla McBride is a cancer survivor, and she wrote about it for her college apps and got into Harvard early admission. Chemo and hair loss and throwing up pieces of your stomach beat the usual extracurriculars hands down. Vijay only got wait-listed, so he still has to go to class.

"I'm not going," I tell him.

"Why not?"

I shake my head.

"What is it?"

Vijay is my best friend. My only friend, at this stage. I have no idea why he's still around. I think he sees me as some kind of rehabilitation project, like the loser dogs he cares for at the shelter.

"Andi, come on," he says. "You've got to. You've got to get your outline in. Beezie'll throw you out if you don't. She threw two seniors out last year for not turning it in."

"I know. But I'm not."

Vijay gives me a worried look. "You take your meds today?" he asks.

"I did."

He sighs. "Catch you later."

"Yeah, V. Later."

I head out of the Castle van Epp, down to the Promenade. It's snowing. I take a seat high above the BQE, stare at Manhattan for a bit, and then I play. For hours. I play until my fingertips are raw. Until I rip a nail and bleed on the strings. Until my hands hurt so bad I forget my heart does.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 472 )
Rating Distribution

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(304)

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(101)

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(32)

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(20)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 478 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Haunting and Beautiful

    "I don't like hope very much. In fact, I hate it. It's the crystal meth of emotions. It hooks you fast and kills you hard. It's bad news. The Worst. It's sharp sticks and cherry bombs"- Andi Alpers




    My Thoughts: Revolution is one of the most powerful books I have ever read. It is hard to put words to how lovely and gripping I thought this book was. Once you start you will not be able to finish, all though I must admit when I was reaching the end, reading the last few pages I stopped, and I put the book down because I didn't want to finish it, I did not want the story to end. Senior Editor, Krista Marino explained it best when she wrote the 'Dear Reader' "Revolution' is a one-of-a-kind reading experience". The character development was so well done, you really learn who each character is and what type of person they are. Alex is a character that I will never forget, she pushed herself into my heart and will remain there. Every time a diary entry would end, my heart would sink. I was desperately seeking her fate just as much as Andi was. Alex will capture the heart of all her readers. It will be impossible not to love and care for her. Reading Revolution was like being transported back and forth through time, to modern day Paris and Brooklyn to Eighteenth Century Paris during the brutality of the French Revolution,. The author draws you into the book so much you feel as if you are living the life of Alex and Andi right there with them. On a lighter side the book was very funny, Andi has an incredible quick-witted humour, there was never a dull moment while reading this book. Her best friend Vijay Gupta had a hilarious sense of humour as well and his many nicknames for his mother always made me laugh. Revolution brings music, art and history together in a beautiful harmony. It brings love, hope, tragedy and self-growth. This book will have something for everyone and I strongly recommend it. People will definitely miss out if they don't read Revolution.

    24 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 23, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Enjoyable

    I loved reading this wonderful book! It is a story that keeps you entertained for hours.

    22 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 5, 2010

    READ OF A LIFETIME!!!

    REVOLUTION is a "Tour de Force" book. I will not want to give any of
    the story away, but be assured that this book is the READ OF A LIFETIME.
    Jennifer Donnelly invented a totally new genre for REVOLUTION.
    And after you read the last sentence of REVOLUTION you will have a
    new understanding of the world and mostly of yourself.

    An inspiration for all ages.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent YA historical fiction - worth the read

    This is my first Jennifer Donnelly read, though I've heard nothing but wonderful things about her previous works. I picked this up from my local library. I'm a demon-speed reader, especially when I really enjoy the plot and am desperate to find out what happens next. I can easily plow through a 300-400 page book in a day or two.

    Well, I couldn't quite do that with this book. Not because I wasn't into the plot - no, no. The plot was dense, and I simply couldn't just breeze through it. I had to absorb it and let it sink. Andi deals with severe depression as a result of a tragedy that occurred in her family of which she holds herself responsible. In a nutshell, this book is the story of her exploring the hole she's dug herself into and how she claws her way out. Intertwined with this plot is a subplot of the history of the French Revolution. It's dirty, violent, and gritty. It's truth. And it's very moving.

    This book may not be for everyone. It's not fluff or a quick read. It's genuinely good YA fiction, which is a rarity in these days of Twihards...There are multiple references to pop culture, mostly dealing with music and bands. If you're not familiar with them you may feel a bit left out. But if you roll with it you'll be fine.

    I look forward to reading more of Donnelly.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Fantastic YA from Jennifer Donnelly

    Andi Alpers is devastated when her brother Truman dies, a situation that has since caused her to sunk into a depression. The only thing that can ease her pain is playing her guitar. Her mother isn't handling it well either, and when Andi's father enrolls her mother in a hospital for a few weeks, he takes Andi with him to Paris. She is hesitant to go, but staying home with failing grades and an even worse reputation doesn't sound much better. However, it isn't very long before Paris becomes much more interesting for Andi. She meets an alluring boy named Virgil, explores the dark catacombs, and finds an old journal with an intriguing history written on it's pages.

    Donnelly's previous YA book A Northern Light is on my list of favorite books of all time, so I have been eagerly awaiting her next one for quite a while. When I saw the cover and read the synopsis of this one, I was largely uninterested. It sounded so boring! When I actually started reading, however, I was soon proven wrong. I fell into Andi's pain and depression almost immediately. I haven't read anything this deliciously angsty in a long time. The poor girl! The short length chapters helped pull me through the almost 500 pages in about two days. I would tell myself "one more chapter" and then suddenly a hundred pages will have gone by! The romance between Andi and Virgil was HOT and I wanted more, more, more of him! There were a few moments when I thought Andi was a little too cliche ("Boys let you down but music never does."), though that didn't turn me off too much. The parallel story written in the journal wasn't nearly as interesting as Andi's story itself, but perhaps the reader needs to be more interested in the French Revolution than I am. All in all, the similarities to Dante's Inferno were well matched, and I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Powerful and Beautiful for YA and Adult Readers Alike

    I am not a YA reader. Many years older. Taught high school and college level lit. for years. After all those years lived and books taught, I LOVED this book. It makes A Tale of Two Cities and Les Miserables relevant to the 21st century. It moves and impresses even a seasoned reader like me. A must-read for YA readers and for those who relate to YA's and to human emotions. Kudos to Jennifer Donnelly for a masterful novel!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2010

    Like nothing I've read before ...

    How powerful was this book? Locomotive, hurricane, a-bomb ... I don't know -- I can't find the words to adequately describe it. I do know I have never been so captivated by a book and I have never learned so much -- about an important period of history, yes, but also about themes that transcend time such as love, grief, forgiveness, growing up, acceptance, hope, evil ... and, um, I guess the whole proverbial human condition. I know now how to respond to the stupidity and brutality of this world. I also have a whole new appreciation for the power of music -- and I'll never listen to The Smiths, Pink Floyd, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Ramones, Led Zeppelin, The Decemberists or Radiohead in quite the same way again.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 14, 2010

    Loved it!!

    I'm so glad i read this! It made me go out and get books on the french revolution just to learn more about it! It had an amazing message about how hard it is to get over a death of someone you loved and how if given the chance you would take their place! I cried so much at the end. definitely worth reading!FYI...she kinda time travels in it so if your looking for something based on reality this probably isn't for you!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 29, 2011

    OK Read

    It was an interesting idea but not executed very well in my opinion. I felt like it didn't really start until halfway through. I love anything involving the French Revolution though so that aspect was great. Still only a so-so read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 6, 2011

    This book was soooo...

    irritating. I couldn't get over the fact that in the first hundred pages the only thing that the main character did was whine and complain about how tortured she was and how getting into Guilliard (a very famous and prestigious music school) was the worst thing that could have possibly happened to anyone. After I got through all of her groaning, it was a nice read. Not special, or horrid. Just nice.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 5, 2011

    Good read

    This book was ok. The characters were interesting and the plot held my attention, but the teenage angst level was way off the charts. i mean, we all feel down sometimes, but seriously? some of the things she does when she feels down are ridiculous... anyway, exciting and interesting plot, a nice book for a rainy day.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 10, 2011

    Wow

    Wow was the word that came from my mouth when I finished reading Jennifer Donnellys Revolution due to me being pretty much speechless :]. When I was at the bookstore I must admit I struggled between this book and another and I am glad I got Revolution. When I got home around 8 I did not put it down until I finished it (around 11). My point is that this is an awesome book! Donnelly shows the hurt we go through when we lose a loved one and how love for another can make you do pretty much anything. Plus I am a huge history geek so the French revolution was a nice treat. So buy/borrow the book you will not be dismayed.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2011

    BEST BOOK I HAVE READ IN A WHILE

    This book from the first page grabs a holed of you and doesn't let you go to the end. The stories of both Alex and Andi are just so moving and so in depth that anyone could relate to them in some way or another. The main focus of this story is love but not just any kind of love. The kind of love you have for a sibling or the love you have for someone that you care for so deeply that you would do anything to protect them from all the bad in the world. Jennifer Donnelly does an amazing job with the history the goes along with this story. This book is a must read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 2, 2011

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    Amazing!!!!

    This book had me hooked from day one. It was truly amazing, incredibly moving. Had a little bit of history in it but definitely not a history book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 31, 2011

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    Excellent blend of history and fiction!

    Wow, just wow. I pretty much picked this book to read based on two things: one, it's by Jennifer Donnelly, and I've read and loved all her books so far, and two, the French Revolution plays a part in the plot. Having gone to France the year before the 200-year anniversary of the storming of the Bastille in high school, that period of history has always interested me. Now that I'm finished, I'm very glad I chose it.

    Andi Alpers is in trouble. She's fighting the guilt and depression that her younger brother's death has left her with. She's dealing with a mother who most days isn't dealing with anything herself at all. She's angry with her father for deserting his family, in spirit long before he physically left them. And she's in real danger of being expelled from her prestigious private school. Once her father hears from the school about her current status, though, Andi finds herself wisked off to Paris over winter break so she can work on her senior thesis under her father's supervision.

    Once there, she finds the two-hundred-year-old diary of Alexandrine Paradis, an ambitious wannabe actress who unwittingly becomes embroiled in the drama surrounding the French Revolution and the doomed life of the young prince of France. Soon, the diary becomes more real to Andi than her own life, and when it ends in a way she can't accept, she nearly loses everything. A new friend helps her to cope, however, and an unexpected dream--or it?--gives her more insight into her own place in the world than she ever dreamed possible. An amazing book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 28, 2011

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    LOVED THIS BOOK!

    I would like to start off by saying how wrong I was! I have always thought audio books and historical novels were not for me. See I know what the characters sound like in my head so hearing the narrators voice throws me off. Also I had a really bad experience with my first audio book. The only reason I gave audio books a second chance was because I forgot to cancel my audible subscription. Historical books are usually hard for me because again I can't picture the voice or feel I could not relate to someone from so long ago but Revolution has changed my mind!

    The first hour or so I was skeptic and it took me about four times restarting the book, because I couldn't convince myself that I would like the audio but once I got past that and really started listening to the story I found myself relating to Andi. In Revolution Andi attends a private school that she doesn't much care for and it leads back to her brother Truman dying but they don't go into it at first. Her mother is an emotional mess and Andi is spiraling out of control and practically suicidal. Her estrange father steps in and takes Andi with him to Paris France for work. Her father was there to perform DNA test on a heart thought to be of ten year old Louis-Charles son of of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette.

    Andi wants nothing more than to return back home to take care of her mother but her father thinks Andi can't be trusted alone and he's right. While in Paris Andi discovers a diary of Louis-Charles nanny who tells the story of what happened to him. Andi slowly because emotionally attached to both Alex and Louis-Charles and hopes for a happy ending for both. Louis-Charles looked a lot like her brother Truman and the story of what is thought to be the last days of his life are tragic.

    While in Paris Andi meets Virgil an aspiring hip-hop artist who can clearly see that Andi is so emotionally broken and yet he is so drawn to her. He completely captured my heart! Andie makes a deal with her father that if she can finish a school assignment early can she return home early but Virgil and Alex's story are factors that make her reconsider leaving Paris.

    The story is so vast and so beautiful I can't explain how much I loved it! I plan to buy the physical copy of this book and listen to the audio again. If you are not sure about audio and/or historical I highly recommend this book to you!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2011

    It was okay...

    I wasn't the biggest fan of this book. It was definitly interesting enough to finish, but there was alot of unessesary language, and many references to drugs. While the drugs are apart of the main character's struggle, I just wasn't a big fan of that.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2011

    Wonderful!

    Donnelly did a wonderful job creating two characters personalities so vividly in this book! I read it in one sitting, and I've read a lot since. Worth buying totally. I love books about the French Rev., and this is definitely one of my favorites! I never found the storyline lacking, or slow, and i highly recommend it,

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 20, 2011

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    Awesome!!!

    I loved this book so much. The history, the words, the characters, all great! Probably the best book I have read in quite a while. Though I recommend it for older teens, because some of the topics about the Revolution are a bit...overwhelming. All in all a great book!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    Absolutely Amazing!

    Absolutely Amazing Book! A little slow at first but overall a great book. I would recommend it to anyone.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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