Revolutionaries of the Cosmos: The Astro-Physicists

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 95%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $19.00   
  • Used (5) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$19.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(49)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Paperback New Bright, new softcover. Clean, glossy copy with NO marks or flaws. No sign of wear.

Ships from: Westlake, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$19.85
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(304)

Condition: New
2008 Paperback New 0199550255. This book is brand new; never used or opened. No remainder marks.; 0.87 x 9.06 x 6.14 Inches; 336 pages.

Ships from: Pflugerville, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$38.15
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(10666)

Condition: New
New Book. Shipped from US within 10 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000.

Ships from: Secaucus, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Galileo, Newton, Herschel, Huggins, Hale, Eddington, Shapley and Hubble: these astronomers applied ideas drawn from physics to astronomy and made dramatic changes to the world-pictures that they inherited. They showed that celestial objects are composed of the same materials as the earth and that they behave in the same way. They displaced successively the earth, the sun and finally the milky way galaxy from being the centre of the universe.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199550258
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 12/30/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr Ian Glass, South African Astronomical Observatory
B.A. Trinity College Dublin 1961
PhD MIT 1968

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Introduction: Talent and opportunity 1

1.1 The astro-physicists 1

1.2 Setting the scene 3

1.3 The talented individual 4

1.4 Motivation 5

1.5 The need for support 6

1.6 Lifetimes in science 6

References 7

2 Galileo: Seeing and believing 8

2.1 Early years 9

2.2 Studies in Pisa 9

2.3 Florence and Siena 11

2.4 Professor at Pisa 1589-1592 11

2.5 Padua 1592-1610 12

2.6 The telescope 15

2.7 The nature of the moon 16

2.8 Return to Florence 17

2.9 Mature scientist 19

2.10 Sunspots 21

2.11 Beginnings of clerical opposition 23

2.12 Science and scripture 24

2.13 Towards the Ptolemaic-Copernican 'Dialogue' 25

2.14 Publication 29

2.15 Private life 30

2.16 Trial-A 'vehement suspicion of heresy' 31

2.17 Aftermath of the trial 33

2.18 Discourses: 'Two New Sciences' 34

2.19 Last years 35

References 38

3 Isaac Newton: Rationalising the universe 40

3.1 Trinity College, Cambridge 43

3.2 Intellectual awakening 44

3.3 Discoveries during the plague years 46

3.4 Beginnings of recognition 48

3.5 Lucasian Professor 49

3.6 The first reflecting telescope 50

3.7 'The oddest, if not the most considerable, detection' 52

3.8 Leibniz and the early papers of Newton 55

3.9 Newton as heretic 56

3.10 Principia 58

3.11 Fame 61

3.12 University politician 62

3.13 Change of character 62

3.14 Fatio 63

3.15 Nervous breakdown 64

3.16 Opticks 65

3.17 Warden of the Mint 66

3.18 President of the Royal Society 67

3.19 Relations with Flamsteed 69

3.20 Knighthood 70

3.21 Dispute with Leibniz 71

3.22 Old age 72

References 75

4 William Herschel: Surveying the heavens 76

4.1 The Herschel family 76

4.2 Hanoveryears 77

4.3 Wandering musician 78

4.4 Life in Bath 80

4.5 Crazy about telescopes 82

4.6 Recognition as an astronomer 85

4.7 Sweeping the sky 86

4.8 Discovery of Uranus 89

4.9 King George III 92

4.10 Motion of the Sun 94

4.11 Construction of the Heavens 95

4.12 Minor discoveries 96

4.13 Datchet, Windsor and the 40-ft telescope 97

4.14 Telescope business 99

4.15 Marriage 102

4.16 Social life 104

4.17 Later discoveries and interests 108

4.18 Doubtful speculations 109

4.19 Asteroids and the Celestial Police 110

4.20 John Frederick William Herschel 110

4.21 Last years of Caroline 113

References 114

5 William Huggins: Celestial chemical analysis 117

5.1 Early years 118

5.2 Shopkeeper 119

5.3 Independence 120

5.4 'A spring of water in a dry and thirsty land' 121

5.5 The 'Riddle of the Nebulae' 128

5.6 Nova T CrB 130

5.7 Comets 131

5.8 Frustrating interlude 131

5.9 Radial motion of the stars 132

5.10 New facilities 133

5.11 Witness at a seance and other activities 137

5.12 An able and enthusiastic assistant 138

5.13 A Victorian household 139

5.14 Advent of photographic spectra 141

5.15 Further spectroscopic forays 143

5.16 The mystery of 'Nebulium' 143

5.17 Eminent Victorian 144

5.18 Margaret Huggins and education 146

5.19 A place of pilgrimage 150

5.20 Last years of William ... 150

5.21 ... and of Margaret 151

References 153

6 George Ellery Hale: Providing the tools 156

6.1 MIT student 159

6.2 Meeting with Rowland 160

6.3 Invention of the spectroheliograph 161

6.4 Marriage and honeymoon 163

6.5 The Kenwood Observatory 163

6.6 Discoveries at Kenwood 165

6.7 University of Chicago 167

6.8 Yerkes-the largest refracting telescope ever made 167

6.9 The Astrophysical Journal 169

6.10 Yerkes Observatory completed 169

6.11 The 60-in. mirror 171

6.12 First attempt on Carnegie 172

6.13 Early days on Mount Wilson 173

6.14 Success with Carnegie 175

6.15 The Snow Telescope 176

6.16 The solar towers 178

6.17 The 60-in. reflector 178

6.18 Hale and the development of Caltech 179

6.19 The 100-in. Hooker telescope 181

6.20 Mental illness 182

6.21 Life and work on Mount Wilson 185

6.22 World War 187

6.23 Completion of the 100-in. 188

6.24 The years as a recluse 190

6.25 The Hale Solar Observatory 191

6.26 Continued public service 194

6.27 The 200-in. Palomar reflector 194

6.28 Slow decline 196

References 197

7 Arthur Eddington: Inside the stars 198

7.1 Trinity College, Cambridge 199

7.2 Royal Greenwich Observatory; Kapteyn's 'Star Drifts' 200

7.3 Professor at Cambridge 201

7.4 'Stellar Movements and the Structure of the Universe' 202

7.5 The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram 204

7.6 Eddington's 'physical intuition' 205

7.7 Prophet of relativity 206

7.8 Conscientious objector 209

7.9 The solar eclipse of 1919 210

7.10 Aftermath of the eclipse 213

7.11 Influence on Lemaitre 215

7.12 The internal constitution of the stars 216

7.13 The mass-luminosity relation 218

7.14 Recreations 219

7.15 Sureness or cocksureness? 221

7.16 The Expanding Universe 223

7.17 The strange case of Chandrasekhar and Sirius B 224

7.18 Eddington's wilder speculations 227

7.19 Recollections of Eddington's students 229

7.20 Frustrations 231

7.21 Final year, illness, and death 232

References 233

8 Harlow Shapley: Defining our galaxy 235

8.1 University of Missouri 237

8.2 Princeton and Henry Norris Russell 239

8.3 'Standard candles' and the distances of the stars 241

8.4 First visit to Harvard 243

8.5 On to Mount Wilson 243

8.6 The Cepheid and RR Lyrae standard candles 244

8.7 The distances of the globular clusters 245

8.8 The centre of the Milky Way 246

8.9 A near miss 247

8.10 The 'Great Debate' 248

8.11 Director of Harvard College Observatory 250

8.12 The Harvard Graduate School 253

8.13 'Shapley's Universe' 255

8.14 Exploring the southern sky 257

8.15 The distribution of galaxies in space 257

8.16 Diversions from astronomy 259

8.17 The Sculptor and Fornax dwarf galaxies 259

8.18 The sociable Director 260

8.19 Other activities 261

8.20 International affairs 261

8.21 Losing the initiative 262

8.22 Post-war social concerns 264

8.23 The 'Communist in the State Department' 264

8.24 Retirement 265

References 266

9 Edwin Hubble: Journeying to the edge 268

9.1 Birth and early years 268

9.2 University of Chicago 270

9.3 Rhodes Scholar 271

9.4 Back to the United States 273

9.5 Graduate student at Yerkes 273

9.6 Major Hubble 275

9.7 Mount Wilson 276

9.8 The distances of the galaxies 279

9.9 Marriage 280

9.10 The 'Tuning Fork' diagram 282

9.11 The Hubbles at home 284

9.12 The recession of the nebulae 285

9.13 Distance indicators 289

9.14 Inner doubts 290

9.15 The Hubble and van Maanen problem 290

9.16 Celebrity status 291

9.17 Counting the galaxies 292

9.18 'The Realm of the Nebulae' 292

9.19 Second World War 294

9.20 The post-war period 295

9.21 Last years 297

References 300

Index 302

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)