Revolutionary America, 1763-1815: A Sourcebook

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Overview

Revolutionary America 1763-1815: A Sourcebook is a collection of dynamic primary sources intended to accompany the second edition of Revolutionary America 1763-1815: A Political History. While the structure of this collection parallels the textbook, it can be used independently as well to bring a more personal perspective to the revolutionary period of American history.

Each chapter begins with a brief introduction and contains excerpts of original documents from the Revolutionary period, including government documents, letters, and diary entries, as well as numerous images. A companion website holds a wealth of primary source document resources, including many of the documents from within this book, as well as links to other valuable online resources. This collection helps give students a sense of the human experience of that turbulent time, bringing life to the struggle to found the United States.

For additional information and classroom resources for both the text and the sourcebook please visit the Revolutionary America companion website at routledge.com/textbooks/revolutionaryamerica.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Cogliano and Phimister’s outstanding collection of primary sources on the eras of the American Revolution and Early Republic will be a tremendous asset for students of American history. The sources they have have included in this collection are not only important, but also, in many cases, quite unexpected - shedding new light on an important subject."

-Richard R. Beeman, Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania

"This Sourcebook narrates American nation-building from many perspectives, relaying all the drama and uncertainty of a revolutionary age. Readers confront the fraught relationship of personal liberty and governmental authority, a tension that remains at the heart of American civic culture."

-Seth Rockman, Professor of History, Brown University

"Those looking for a way to involve students in history or a lively supplement to a classroom textbook will welcome this volume ... The introductions in the Sourcebook provide concise, well-written interpretations of key events; the sources section leads readers to relevant documents to that they can draw their own conclusions ... This is a great resource. Highly Recommended." – Choice

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415997126
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/15/2010
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 312
  • Sales rank: 1,425,218
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Francis D. Cogliano is Professor of American History at the University of Edinburgh where he specializes in the history of revolutionary and early national America. He is the author of Revolutionary America, 1763-1815: A Political History.

Kirsten Phimister holds a Ph.D. in American history from the University of Edinburgh.

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Table of Contents

Figures xiii

Acknowledgments xv

Introduction 1

Chapter 1 Native Americans and the American Revolution 7

1 Southern Indians during the Seven Years' War 8

2 Petition from the Paxton Boys, 1764 10

3 Logan's Lament, 1775 12

4 Congress Appeals to the Six Nations, July 13, 1775 12

5 Joseph Brant Speaks to Lord George Germain, March 14, 1776 15

6 Joseph Brant, 1786 16

7 A Missionary Speaks on Behalf of the Oneidas and Onondagas, 1777 17

8 Treaty with the Delawares, 1778 18

9 Chickasaw Chiefs Appeal to Congress, 1783 20

10 The Eve of War, 1811 22

11 Aftermath of the War of 1812 24

Chapter 2 British North America in 1763 27

1 Bill of Rights, 1689 28

2 Benjamin Franklin, Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries, 1751 30

3 Servants and Slaves in Virginia, 1722 33

4 Advertisements for Runaways, 1752, 1766 36

5 Albany Plan of Union, 1754 36

6 Join, or Die, 1754 39

7 Treaty of Paris, 1763 40

8 Governing a New World 43

Chapter 3 The Imperial Crisis 47

1 The Stump Act. March 22, 1765 48

2 Virginia Resolves. May 29, 1765 50

3 The Stamp Act Congress Asserts American Rights and Grievances, October 19, 1765 51

4 The Death of Liberty, October 31, 1765 53

5 New York Stamp Act Riot 54

6 Examination of Benjamin Franklin Before the House of Commons, 1766 55

7 Parliament Repeals the Stamp Act. March 18, 1766 61

8 Parliament Declares Its Authority, March 18, 1766 61

9 The Boston Massacre 62

10 Paul Revere's Engraving of the Boston Massacre 64

11 First Continental Congress. Declaration of Rights and Grievances, October 14, 1774 65

12 New Hampshire Non-Importation Agreement, 1774 69

Chapter 4 Revolution, 1775-1776 73

1 Patrick Henry, Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death, March 23, 1775 74

2 The Battles of Lexington and Concord. April 19, 1775 76

3 Battle of Lexington, 1775 77

4 General Gage's Proclamation, June 12, 1775 78

5 Bunker's Hill or America's Head Dress, 1776 80

6 Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms. July 6, 1775 81

7 Olive Branch Petition. July 8, 1775 85

8 George 111 Proclaims the Americans in a State of Rebellion, August 23, 1775 88

9 Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776 89

10 Jefferson's Original Rough Draft of the Declaration of Independence 94

11 Statue of George III Demolished, July 9, 1776 98

Chapter 5 Winning Independence: The Wars of the American Revolution 101

1 A British View of the Siege of Boston 102

2 George Washington Reflects on His Appointment to Command the Continental Army 102

3 Harassment of Loyalists in South Carolina 104

4 Observations of a New Hampshire loyalist 104

5 Congress Resolves to Protect Loyalists, June 18, 1776 107

6 Washington Reflects on the Challenges Facing the Continental Army 108

7 Letters from a Rebel Prisoner 112

7a William Russell to Benjamin Edes, July 1780 112

7b William Russell to Mary Richardson Russell, March 4, 1781 113

8 Treaty of Paris, 1783 113

9 A Loyalist Returns 116

9a Samuel Curwen to William Pynchon, London, November 28, 1783 117

9b Samuel Curwen, Diary, September 25, 1784 118

Chapter 6 African Americans in the Age of Revolution 119

1 Virginia Revolutionaries Defend Slavery 120

2 Lord Dunmore Promises Freedom to Virginia Slaves 121

3 Thomas Jefferson on Slavery and African Americans 122

3a Rough Draft of the Declaration of Independence, July 1, 1776 123

3b Notes on the State of Virginia, 1781-1782 123

3c Benjamin Banneker to Thomas Jefferson, Baltimore County, August 19, 1791 127

3d Thomas Jefferson to Benjamin Banneker, August 30, 1791 129

4 Massachusetts Slaves Petition for Freedom 130

5 Rebel Soldiers 131

6 Gradual Abolition in Pennsylvania 131

7 Freedom Certificate, 1783 132

8 Pennsylvania Abolitionists Petition Congress, 1790 133

9 An Account of Toussaint L'Ouverture 134

10 Revolution in Haiti 136

11 Ben Woolfolk, Testimony in the Trial of Gabriel, October 6, 1800 137

12 Rebel's Statement from Gabriel's Conspiracy. September 25, 1804 138

Chapter 7 The Confederation Era 141

1 John Adams Calls for New Constitutions, 1775 142

2 Pennsylvania's New Constitution-A Critical View 143

3 Massachusetts Voters Reject a Constitution 144

4 Massachusetts Tries Again, 1780 145

5 The Articles of Confederation (1777) 147

6 Alexander Hamilton Decries the Weakness of Congress 149

7 Banknotes 152

8 Shays's Rebellion 154

9 The Shaysites Make Their Case 155

10 Massachusetts Pursues a Contradictory Strategy in Response to the Rebels 157

11 "A Little Rebellion Now and Then Is a Good Thing": Jefferson Reacts to Shays's Rebellion 159

Chapter 8 Creating the Constitution 163

1 Madison on the Flaws of the Articles of Confederation 164

2 The Virginia Plan 168

3 The New Jersey Plan 170

4 Franklin Addresses the Constitutional Convention 173

5 Federalist Number 10 174

6 Political Creed of Every Federalist 180

7 Opposition to the Constitution in Pennsylvania 180

8 The Grand Federal Edifice 184

9 Bill of Rights, 1789 185

Chapter 9 American Women in the Age of Revolution 189

1 Deborah Franklin Describes the Stamp Act Riots 190

2 Benjamin Franklin to Deborah Franklin, London, April 6, 1766 192

3 Deborah Franklin: Power of Attorney, October 14, 1768 193

4 Boston Women Boycott Tea, 1770 194

5 The Edenton Tea Party, 1774 195

6 Abigail Adams to John Adams 196

7 The Sentiments of an American Woman, 1780 198

8 The Deposition of a Female Spy, 1781 200

9 Petition of Rachel Wells to the Continental Congress, 1786 202

10 Benjamin Rush, Thoughts upon Female Education, 1787 204

11 Diary of Hannah Callender, July 4, 1788 207

12 Extracts from the New Jersey Constitution, 1776, 1844 207

13 Declaration of Sentiments, 1848 208

Chapter 10 The Federalist Era 211

1 A Federalist Vision of Economic Development 212

1a The Report on Public Credit 212

1b The Report on Manufactures 215

2 "Those Who Labor in the Earth": Jefferson's Opposition to Manufacturing 217

3 Opposition to Hamilton's Program 218

4 The Whiskey Rebellion 219

5 Washington's Farewell Address 220

6 The Alien and Sedition Acts 225

6a An Act Concerning Aliens, June 25, 1798 225

6b An Act Respecting Alien Enemies, July 6, 1798 226

6c An Act in Addition to the Act, Entitled "An Act for the Punishment of Certain Crimes Against the United States" 227

7 The Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions 228

7a Virginia Resolutions, December 21, 1798 228

7b Kentucky Resolutions, December 3, 1799 229

Chapter 11 An Empire of Liberty, 1801-1815 233

1 The Ordinance of 1784 234

2 Thomas Jefferson, First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1801 236

3 Mad Tom in a Rage, 1801 239

4 Instructions to Lewis and Clark 240

5 The Constitutional Implications of the Louisiana Purchase 245

6 Thomas Jefferson, Third Annual Message to Congress, October 17, 1803 246

7 "Ograbme" Cartoon, c. 1808 250

8 A Boxing Match, or Another Bloody Nose for John Bull, 1813 251

9 Francis Scott Key, "Star-Spangled Banner" September 14, 1814 252

10 The Hartford Convention, 1814 253

11 The Battle of New Orleans 256

Appendix 259

1 The Declaration of Independence 259

2 The Constitution of the United States 263

3 The Bill of Rights 274

Permissions and Sources 277

Index 289

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