Revolutionary Era: Primary Documents on Events from 1776 to 1800 [NOOK Book]

Overview

"From 1776 to 1800, the United States ceased to be a fantastic dream and became a stable reality. Newspapers were increasingly the public's major source of information about people and events outside of their community. The press reflected the issues of the day. Its foremost concern was naturally the armed struggle with Britain. The press covered the conflict, providing both patriot and loyalist interpretations of the battles and personalities. Yet after the British withdrew, a host of new challenges confronted the United States." "Again, the
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Revolutionary Era: Primary Documents on Events from 1776 to 1800

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Overview

"From 1776 to 1800, the United States ceased to be a fantastic dream and became a stable reality. Newspapers were increasingly the public's major source of information about people and events outside of their community. The press reflected the issues of the day. Its foremost concern was naturally the armed struggle with Britain. The press covered the conflict, providing both patriot and loyalist interpretations of the battles and personalities. Yet after the British withdrew, a host of new challenges confronted the United States." "Again, the press not only purveyed the facts. It became a political tool trumpeting the viewpoint of Republicans and Federalists, ushering in a new era of American journalism." Beginning with an extensive overview essay of the period, this book focuses on 26 pressing issues of the war and the early republic. Each issue is presented with an introductory essay and multiple primary documents from the newspapers of the day, which illustrate both sides of the debate. This is a perfect resource for students interested in the Revolutionary War, the birth of the new nation, and the actual opinions and words of those involved.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-These collections feature excerpts from contemporary newspapers-opinion pieces, essays, letters, interviews, and poems-in addition to straightforward reporting. Each covers 26 to 30 key events and issues, with 4 to 12 excerpts for each presented in a pro/con format. Each chapter begins with an overview of the issue/event and brief summary of the documents, and concludes with discussion questions. A few black-and-white illustrations are included. Unfortunately, there are no maps or descriptive lists of persons and incidents mentioned. The absence of glossaries or annotations is a crucial omission. While a few difficult and/or unusual terms, archaic spellings, foreign phrases, and numerous allusions are defined, the vast majority are not and will stymie readers, e.g., phrenzy; "So mote it be!"; Volumnia; "a tournament with windmills"; Sylla; "the pas qui conte"; "-ye fustian declaimers for liberty!" Not all the chapters are balanced. Finally, there is little attempt to identify misinformation in the excerpts. Although no other titles use only newspapers, a few focus on primary documents. Brenda Stalcup's Reconstruction (Greenhaven, 1995) uses a similar format and is thoughtful and readable, with pertinent documents, discussion questions, a chronology, an annotated bibliography, and political cartoons. David F. Burg's The American Revolution (2001) and Joe H. Kirchberger's The Civil War and Reconstruction (1990, both Facts On File) contain historical data, detailed chronologies, and short "eyewitness testimony" arranged chronologically, as well as maps and biographies. Any of these books will be more useful to students than these series titles.-Ann W. Moore, Schenectady County Public Library, NY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

CAROL SUE HUMPHREY is Professor of History at Oklahoma Baptist University. She is the author of This Popular Engine: The Role of New England Newspapers During the American Revolution and The Press of the Young Republic, 1783-1833 (Greenwood, 1996).

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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 The reality of independence, 1776-1781 1
Ch. 2 Wartime morale, 1776-1781 33
Ch. 3 The battles of the Revolutionary War, 1776-1781 49
Ch. 4 General George Washington, 1776-1783 67
Ch. 5 Benedict Arnold, 1780-1781 81
Ch. 6 The Articles of Confederation, 1777-1781 93
Ch. 7 The union in crisis? : 1782-1787 105
Ch. 8 Shays's Rebellion, 1786-1787 119
Ch. 9 Constitutional convention, 1787 127
Ch. 10 Ratification struggle, 1787-1789 137
Ch. 11 The Bill of Rights, 1787-1791 161
Ch. 12 The issue of the Native Americans, 1791-1797 181
Ch. 13 The role of women, 1780-1798 189
Ch. 14 Slave revolt in Santo Domingue (Haiti), 1791-1793 201
Ch. 15 President George Washington, 1789-1799 211
Ch. 16 The early years of the French revolution, 1789-1793 223
Ch. 17 The Whiskey Rebellion, 1794 233
Ch. 18 Jay's Treaty, 1795-1796 243
Ch. 19 The rise of the party press, 1797-1800 253
Ch. 20 The French revolution gone crazy, 1793-1798 263
Ch. 21 American neutrality, 1793 277
Ch. 22 The election of 1796, September-November 1796 295
Ch. 23 The quasi-war with France, 1797-1798 303
Ch. 24 The XYZ affair, 1798 313
Ch. 25 The Sedition Act, 1798-1800 323
Ch. 26 The election of 1800, February 1800-March 1801 337
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