Revolver

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
All the rules fell by the wayside with Revolver, as the Beatles began exploring new sonic territory, lyrical subjects, and styles of composition. It wasn't just Lennon and McCartney, either -- Harrison staked out his own dark territory with the tightly wound, cynical rocker "Taxman"; the jaunty yet dissonant "I Want to Tell You"; and "Love You To," George's first and best foray into Indian music. Such explorations were bold, yet they were eclipsed by Lennon's trippy kaleidoscopes of sound. His most straightforward number was "Doctor Robert," an ode to his dealer, and things just got stranger from there as he buried "And Your Bird Can Sing" in a maze of ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
All the rules fell by the wayside with Revolver, as the Beatles began exploring new sonic territory, lyrical subjects, and styles of composition. It wasn't just Lennon and McCartney, either -- Harrison staked out his own dark territory with the tightly wound, cynical rocker "Taxman"; the jaunty yet dissonant "I Want to Tell You"; and "Love You To," George's first and best foray into Indian music. Such explorations were bold, yet they were eclipsed by Lennon's trippy kaleidoscopes of sound. His most straightforward number was "Doctor Robert," an ode to his dealer, and things just got stranger from there as he buried "And Your Bird Can Sing" in a maze of multi-tracked guitars, gave Ringo a charmingly hallucinogenic slice of childhood whimsy in "Yellow Submarine," and then capped it off with a triptych of bad trips: the spiraling "She Said She Said"; the crawling, druggy "I'm Only Sleeping"; and "Tomorrow Never Knows," a pure nightmare where John sang portions of the Tibetan Book of the Dead into a suspended microphone over Ringo's thundering, menacing drumbeats and layers of overdubbed, phased guitars and tape loops. McCartney's experiments were formal, as he tried on every pop style from chamber pop to soul, and when placed alongside Lennon's and Harrison's outright experimentations, McCartney's songcraft becomes all the more impressive. The biggest miracle of Revolver may be that the Beatles covered so much new stylistic ground and executed it perfectly on one record, or it may be that all of it holds together perfectly. Either way, its daring sonic adventures and consistently stunning songcraft set the standard for what pop/rock could achieve. Even after Sgt. Pepper, Revolver stands as the ultimate modern pop album and it's still as emulated as it was upon its original release.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
All the rules fell by the wayside with Revolver, as the Beatles began exploring new sonic territory, lyrical subjects, and styles of composition. It wasn't just Lennon and McCartney, either -- Harrison staked out his own dark territory with the tightly wound, cynical rocker "Taxman"; the jaunty yet dissonant "I Want to Tell You"; and "Love You To," George's first and best foray into Indian music. Such explorations were bold, yet they were eclipsed by Lennon's trippy kaleidoscopes of sound. His most straightforward number was "Doctor Robert," an ode to his dealer, and things just got stranger from there as he buried "And Your Bird Can Sing" in a maze of multi-tracked guitars, gave Ringo a charmingly hallucinogenic slice of childhood whimsy in "Yellow Submarine," and then capped it off with a triptych of bad trips: the spiraling "She Said She Said"; the crawling, druggy "I'm Only Sleeping"; and "Tomorrow Never Knows," a pure nightmare where John sang portions of the Tibetan Book of the Dead into a suspended microphone over Ringo's thundering, menacing drumbeats and layers of overdubbed, phased guitars and tape loops. McCartney's experiments were formal, as he tried on every pop style from chamber pop to soul, and when placed alongside Lennon's and Harrison's outright experimentations, McCartney's songcraft becomes all the more impressive. The biggest miracle of Revolver may be that the Beatles covered so much new stylistic ground and executed it perfectly on one record, or it may be that all of it holds together perfectly. Either way, its daring sonic adventures and consistently stunning songcraft set the standard for what pop
ock could achieve. Even after Sgt. Pepper's, Revolver stands as the ultimate modern pop album and it's still as emulated as it was upon its original release.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 7/15/2008
  • Label: Emd Int'l
  • EAN: 5099910409718
  • Catalog Number: 7009

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Taxman (2:38)
  2. 2 Eleanor Rigby (2:06)
  3. 3 I'm Only Sleeping (3:00)
  4. 4 Love You To (2:59)
  5. 5 Here, There and Everywhere (2:24)
  6. 6 Yellow Submarine (2:38)
  7. 7 She Said She Said (2:36)
  8. 8 Good Day Sunshine (2:09)
  9. 9 And Your Bird Can Sing (2:00)
  10. 10 For No One (1:59)
  11. 11 Doctor Robert (2:14)
  12. 12 I Want to Tell You (2:27)
  13. 13 Got to Get You into My Life (2:29)
  14. 14 Tomorrow Never Knows (3:01)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
The Beatles Primary Artist
George Harrison Guitar, Sitar, Tambourine, Vocals
John Lennon Organ, Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Horn, Marimbas, Tambourine, Vocals
Paul McCartney Guitar, Bass Guitar, Vocals
Ringo Starr Drums, Tambourine, Vocals
George Martin Organ, Piano, Background Vocals
Neil Aspinall Background Vocals
Anvil Bhagwat Tabla
Alan Branscombe Tenor Saxophone
Alan Civil Horn, French Horn
Peter Coe Tenor Saxophone
Les Conlon Trumpet
Geoff Emerick Background Vocals
Mal Evans Background Vocals
Tony Gilbert Violin
Ian Hammer Trumpet
Patti Harrison Background Vocals
Jurgen Hess Violin
Norman Jones Cello
Sidney Sax Violin
John Sharpe Violin
Stephen Shingles Viola
Derrick Simpson Cello
Eddie "Tan Tan" Thornton Trumpet
John Underwood Viola
Technical Credits
George Harrison Sound Effects
John Lennon Sound Effects
George Martin Producer
Geoff Emerick Engineer
Alan Rouse Liner Notes
Klaus Voormann Cover Design, Cover Illustration
Kevin Howlett Liner Notes
Steve Rooke Remastering
Guy Massey Remastering
Drew Lorimer Redesign
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Customer Reviews

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Band

    Between the two great albums RUBBER SOUL and SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND came this 1966 effort. It is, to my thinking, the most consistent Beatles record. Each song is purposeful. While each song bears the stamp of either John, Paul, George or Ringo, there is a thoughtful mood throughout. It's the most cerebral Beatles album. The lyrics for each song have a level of irony, as if the composer of each song has stepped outside himself and looked in. It is adventurous. It rocks, it soothes, it laughs. This was the Beatles at their most united and yet individualistic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Five stars aren't enough for 'Revolver'

    'Revolver' is my favorite album of all time, not just my favorite Beatles album. A veritable museum of song - in 14 songs JPG&R visit all sorts of musical style (chamber music for "Eleanor Rigby", out 'n out psychedelia for "Tomorrow Never Knows", soul for "Got to Get You Into My Life", Indian raga for "Love You To" etc) and the album remains solidly consistent and even throughout. Having grown up with the 11-track USA Capitol LP, it was a real pleasure to get it on CD back in the late 80's - those three missing Lennon tracks which were on the UK version all along made it that much better. 'Revolver' should get six stars on a five-star rating system!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    I Want To Tell You That This Album Is The Greatest

    This is obviously one of Fab Four's greatest. Any Taxman could tax me 500% for this album. She Said, She Said you have to buy it! It will Love You Too. And you won't need anymore trips to Doctor Robert!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The Beatles: Revolver

    This was voted the #1 album of all time by VH1's greatest albums countdown. This album took the album format and made it the way to purchase music. Besides that, this may be the greatest album of all time. The tracks are all stellar: Taxman, Eleanor Rigby, Yellow Submarine and all the others. The track that doesn't get enough credit is, my personal favorite, And Your Bird Can Sing. That song is absolutely amazing. Buy this album, you won't be sorry.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Revolver is great!

    This is a pretty neat album. Although I think that George's "Taxman" is an odd song, something about it is just GREAT!! I am crazy about the sunshiny goodness of "Good Day Sunshine" and I love "Here, There and Everywhere". This is a great CD! The cover is pretty groovy too, thanks to the work of Klaus Voormann, the designer of the album cover!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Best Album Ever? Possibly...

    Ever since the Beatles released Rubber Soul and took on their new sound, growing as songwriters and experimenting more in the studio (and taking more psychedellic drugs) they made a musical impression on the world that has yet to be matched. Classic after classic was released by this amazing group, it's staggering. With so many special albums, it's hard to pick their best album, (impossible for me) but however you rank them, this album must be towards the top. Vh1 named it the best album in their 100 greatest album list, and it's understandable. There isn't a weak track on the album, with all Beatle's contributing. George Harrison gets a couple songs and makes the most of his opportunity, such as the first track "Taxman." Even Ringo pops in for a song with "yellow Submarine." Of course most of the material is penned by Lennon/McCartney. The two McCartney tracks that stick out to me are Elanor Rigby, and Here There and Everywhere, which I think is the best song Macca ever wrote. Then of course Lennon (my personal fave) contributes several great tracks, as well as one of the most drug-fueled songs the beatles ever wrote "Tomorrow Never Knows" (very trippy). This album belongs in your collection, and don't even think about calling yourself a Beatle fan without it. Incredible

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Wonderful! essential listening!

    I recently bought this second hand, as I couldn't get it for less than $40 in NZ. The songs struck me as not only original and unique, but the lyrics were ones that I found myself singing throughout the week. The other aspect of this album which was amazing was that all the songs were different, and not relying on other songs to compensate. Every song had it's part on the album, like a great stage show.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Revolver

    Revolver is a superb album. What can I say that hasn't been said before? Heaps and heaps, I can assure you. But I, with my fractured train of thought, could never do justice to what I feel of the songs on Revolver. My words are shallow indications of my thoughts. Know what I mean?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Simply Classic

    Revolver is very close in nature to Rubber Soul (which is not a bad thing at all) and treating them as two parts of a single work is not unusual. I know that a new set of remasters are being released but the re-released albums have an embedded video on the same disk which have, historically made such CD's a problem to play on many units, either the video plays and not the audio, or the other way around. I will certainly wait to hear if that particular problem has been solved before I consider the 2009 re-released versions.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    At the Threshold of a New Era.

    One of the most important albums by The Beatles was 'Revolver', released in Europe in 1966. It marked the end of their Rock and Roll period and at the same time had already some songs of what would become the psychedelic period of the "Fabulous Four." 'I'm Only Dreaming' and 'Tomorrow never knows' are a good example of that whole new style. We Beatles fans had to wait two very long years for the release of 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band', the psychedelic album.

    'Revolver' has some songs as beautiful as a rare gem. 'Eleonor Rigby', a melancholic song about old and lonely people.
    My favorite song is 'Good Day Sunshine'. They use no guitars but two pianos and play them in a jazzy way. The three songs I just mentioned are in the old style - ballads and rock.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    This album is not too bad if you like to listen to good music. In which case it is quite possible that you will enjoy it. I know that I do. When you have nothing to do you could place this disc in your CD player and have a jolly good time. You might like it. I know I'll be listening, will you?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Best that the Beatles ever did

    The Beatles are one of the best bands in the world and every one of their albums is great but this one really sticks out. All the songs are great and are the best that they recorded together while they were happy with eachother.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The Beatles' best album bar none!

    I know that Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club band is widely regarded as the Beatles'masterpiece and as a reflection of the time in which it was released it is certainly their most influential record. But, Revolver is their best album hands down. It was Revolver that marked the Beatles transition from pop to rock. Rubber Soul marked the prelude to that transition, but their power pop sound still dominated that record. With Revolver that transition is complete. After just one listen to this masterpiece you will ask yourself, Is this the same band that recorded I Wanna Hold Your Hand or She Loves You not three years before? Every track on this album is worth listening to. The Lennon/McCartney compositions are pure genius. The world weariness of "Eleanor Rigby" and "For No One." The pure escapism of "I'm Only Sleeping" "Yellow Submarine" and "Tomorrow Never Knows." The bouyant optimism of "Here, There & Everywhere," a McCartney composition that John Lennon called the best love song ever written, "Good Day Sunshine" and "Got to Get You into My Life." George Harrison really comes into his own as a songwriter on this record with three of his best compositions, "Taxman," a biting swipe at the oppressive British taxation code, "Love You To," a sitar driven philosophical gem and "I Want to Tell You" where George adopts the role of a guru. The stand out track on this album though is "Tomorrow Never Knows" one of the weirdest songs the Beatles ever recorded. This song underscores the shift in the Beatles philosophy and music in a most profound manner. Nothing in their previous canon even hinted at a song like this and nothing forthcoming would even match it. This is the album that paved the way for Sgt. Pepper and that changed the face of 60s rock forever.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Classic

    Buy it. It it worth it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Still the Best

    This album in a word is PERFECTION. Every song has its purpose, while The Beatles prove to the world that they are truly creative and revolutionary. "Tomorrow Never Knows" is my favorite Beatles song of all-time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The Greatest Rock & Roll Album Ever Made

    Seriously.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A must have Beatles album

    A truly great album! It's a toss up of whether Revolver or Sgt. Peppers is their best, although all of their albums are great (including Magical Mystery Tour).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Yo

    I think that all music guide would turn you away for this album. That review isn't any good. Take it from me, this album is dang good!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Listener: 15-Year-Old Beatles Fan

    Another winner by The Beatles! What a cool sounding album! Every track is just great! You can just listen to it over, and over and over again! We even get to hear more of the sitar, and I must say we get to see some great George Harrison and John Lennon songs on here, but Paul and Ringo have some good songs as well. This is definately a MUST have! I can't even start to describe how GOOD this album is! Words cannot even come to describe this album! If you haven't heard it yet, you're in for a treat! This is a wonderful album and truely a must have in your CD collection. Enjoy, new listeners! Welcome to the club!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The Beatles' Finest (Half) Hour

    ''If pop music were destroyed tomorrow, we could re-create it from this album alone.'' This is a perfect description of this album. Every track is perfect. You have innocence in ''Good Day Sunshine'' and ''Yellow Submarine.''You have maturity in ''Eleanor Rigby.'' A number of really great love songs, specifically the Beach Boys-esque ''Here There & Everywhere,'' possibly the Beatles' best song. Harrison has three great songs: ''The Taxman'' ''I Want To Tell You'' and ''Love You To,'' which, combined with Lennon's ''Tomorrow Never Knows,'' announced The Beatles full involvment in psychedelia. Combined with solid, solid songs like ''I'm Only Sleeping'' & ''She Said She Said'' make this the Beatles greatest and definitely one of the Top 5 Albums of all-time. 1966 was THE year of music. Several albums were released in addition to ''Revolver'' that marked the transition from decadent and innocent pop fluff, to mature, important music that actually had something important to say. Finally, if every one of these songs had been released, they would have been #1 songs, without a doubt.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews