Rexx Programmer's Reference

Overview

  • Originally developed for mainframes but highly portable across platforms-from servers to desktops to handhelds-Rexx is an easy yet powerful scripting language that's widely used for rapid application development.
  • Covers Rexx interpreters for specialized functions-object-oriented, mainframe, and handheld.
  • There are 8 different free Rexx interpreters optimized for different ...
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Overview

  • Originally developed for mainframes but highly portable across platforms-from servers to desktops to handhelds-Rexx is an easy yet powerful scripting language that's widely used for rapid application development.
  • Covers Rexx interpreters for specialized functions-object-oriented, mainframe, and handheld.
  • There are 8 different free Rexx interpreters optimized for different platforms and uses. This book shows how to use them all.
  • Shows how to script for GUIs, databases, web servers, XML, and other interfaces.
  • Details how to make the best use of Rexx tools and interfaces, with examples for both Linux and Windows.
  • Includes a tutorial with lots of examples to help people get up and running.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
If you’ve spent time on IBM platforms -- especially mainframe or midrange -- chances are you know Rexx. Over a million developers recognize its productivity, power, and simplicity. Nowadays, it’ll run on everything from Palm and Windows handhelds to Linux and Solaris boxes. Whether you’re refreshing your skills or learning Rexx for the first time, you’ve hit the jackpot with Rexx Programmer’s Reference.

Howard Fosdick covers all the language basics, from syntax to style, but that’s just the beginning. There’s plenty of coverage of “modern” Rexx: GUIs, web programming, SQL and XML interfaces. There’s a lengthy section on today’s most powerful Rexx tools and implementations, from Regina and Reginald to the newly open-sourced Open Object Rexx. Finally, there are references to everything from NetRexx to mainframe extended functions.

There aren’t a lot of new Rexx books out there. Fortunately, this one’s terrific. Bill Camarda, from the May 2005 Read Only

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764579967
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 2/28/2005
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 720
  • Sales rank: 821,201
  • Product dimensions: 7.38 (w) x 9.28 (h) x 1.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Howard Fosdick has performed DBA and systems support work as an independent consultant for 15 years. He’s coded in Rexx for nearly two decades and has worked in most other major scripting languages. Fosdick has written many technical articles, founded two database users’ groups, and is known as the originator of such concepts as “hype cycles” and “open consulting.”
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Table of Contents

Foreword.

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

Part I.

Chapter 1: Introduction to Scripting and Rexx.

Chapter 2: Language Basics.

Chapter 3: Control Structures.

Chapter 4: Arrays.

Chapter 5: Input and Output.

Chapter 6: String Manipulation.

Chapter 7: Numbers, Calculations, and Conversions.

Chapter 8: Subroutines, Functions, and Modularity.

Chapter 9: Debugging and the Trace Facility.

Chapter 10: Errors and Condition Trapping.

Chapter 11: The External Data Queue, or “Stack”.

Chapter 12: Rexx with Style.

Chapter 13: Writing Portable Rexx.

Chapter 14: Issuing System Commands.

Chapter 15: Interfacing to Relational Databases.

Chapter 16: Graphical User Interfaces.

Chapter 17: Web Programming with CGI and Apache.

Chapter 18: XML and Other Interfaces.

Part II.

Chapter 19: Evolution and Implementations.

Chapter 20: Regina.

Chapter 21: Rexx/imc.

Chapter 22: Brexx.

Chapter 23: Reginald.

Chapter 24: Handhelds and Embedded Programming.

Chapter 25: Rexx for Palm OS.

Chapter 26: r4 and Object-Oriented roo!

Chapter 27: Open Object Rexx.

Chapter 28: Open Object Rexx Tutorial.

Chapter 29: IBM Mainframe Rexx.

Chapter 30: NetRexx.

Part III.

Appendix A: Resources.

Appendix B: Instructions.

Appendix C: Functions.

Appendix D: Regina Extended Functions.

Appendix E: Mainframe Extended Functions.

Appendix F: Rexx/SQL Functions.

Appendix G: Rexx/Tk Functions.

Appendix H: Tools, Interfaces, and Packages.

Appendix I: Open Object Rexx: Classes and Methods.

Appendix J: Mod_Rexx: Functions and Special Variables.

Appendix K: NetRexx: Quick Reference.

Appendix L: Interpreter System Information.

Appendix M: Answers to “Test Your Understanding” Questions.

Index.

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