Rhetorical Education in America

Overview

A timely collection of essays by prominent scholars in the field—on the past, present, and future of rhetoric instruction.

From Isocrates and Aristotle to the present, rhetorical education has consistently been regarded as the linchpin of a participatory democracy, a tool to foster civic action and social responsibility. Yet, questions of who should receive rhetorical education, in what form, and for what purpose, continue to vex teachers and ...

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Overview

A timely collection of essays by prominent scholars in the field—on the past, present, and future of rhetoric instruction.

From Isocrates and Aristotle to the present, rhetorical education has consistently been regarded as the linchpin of a participatory democracy, a tool to foster civic action and social responsibility. Yet, questions of who should receive rhetorical education, in what form, and for what purpose, continue to vex teachers and scholars.

The essays in this volume converge to explore the purposes, problems, and possibilities of rhetorical education in America on both the undergraduate and graduate levels and inside and outside the academy. William Denman examines the ancient model of the "citizen-orator" and its value to democratic life. Thomas Miller argues that English departments have embraced a literary-research paradigm and sacrificed the teaching of rhetorical skills for public participation. Susan Kates explores how rhetoric is taught at nontraditional institutions, such as Berea College in Kentucky, where Appalachian dialect is espoused. Nan Johnson looks outside the academy at the parlor movement among women in antebellum America. Michael Halloran examines the rhetorical education provided by historical landmarks, where visitors are encouraged to share a common public discourse. Laura Gurak presents the challenges posed to traditional notions of literacy by the computer, the promises and dangers of internet technology, and the necessity of a critical cyber-literacy for future rhetorical curricula.

Collectively, the essays coalesce around timely political and cross-disciplinary issues. Rhetorical Education in America serves to orient scholars and teachers in rhetoric, regardless of their disciplinary home, and help to set an agenda for future classroom practice and curriculum design.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The contribution of this book to the field lies in its recognition of diverse sites of rhetorical education, its address to gendered and racial audiences for rhetorical education in those sites, and its attention to public persuasion as a product of governmental and environmental texts."—Susan Miller, author of Assuming the Positions: Cultural Pedagogy and the Politics of Commonplace Writing

"[Rhetorical Education in America] is a volume that should be in every library and one that those interested in the history of American composition studies will want to own."
—Rhetorica

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780817355753
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/2009
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 1,272,620
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Cheryl Glenn is Associate Professor of English at Penn State University and author of Unspoken: A Rhetoric of Silence and Rhetoric Retold: Regendering the Tradition from Antiquity through the Renaissance. Margaret Lyday is Associate Professor of English at Penn State University and author of numerous articles on the rhetoric of narrative in such journals as College Board Review, English Record, and College English.  Wendy B. Sharer is Assistant Professor of English at East Carolina University and author of Vote and Voice: Women's Organizations and Political Literacy, 1915-1930.

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Table of Contents

Rhetorical education in America (a broad stroke introduction)
Pt. I The implications of rhetorical education
1 Rhetoric, the "citizen-orator," and the revitalization of civic discourse in American life 3
2 Lest we go the way of the classics : toward a rhetorical future for English departments 18
3 "To get an education and teach my people" : rhetoric for social change 36
Pt. II Rhetorical education in diverse classrooms
4 Sew it seams : (a)mending civic rhetorics for our classrooms and for rhetorical history 55
5 Politics, identity, and the language of Appalachia : James Watt Raine on "mountain speech and song" 74
6 A "forgotten" location : a rhetorical curriculum in English education 87
Pt. III Rhetorical education beyond the classroom
7 Parlor rhetoric and the performance of gender in postbellum America 107
8 Writing history on the landscape : the tour road at the saratoga battlefield as text 129
9 Transcendence at yellowstone : educating a public in an uninhabitable place 145
Pt. IV Rhetorical education : back to the future
10 (Re)turning to Aristotle : metaphor and the rhetorical education of students 163
11 Cyberliteracy : toward a new rhetorical consciousness 179
Afterword 198
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