Rhino Ranch

( 19 )

Overview

• Highly acclaimed, iconic author: Larry McMurtry is renowned for his elegiac prose, sharp wit, and engaging plotlines. His Thalia, Texas, series is among his most famous and Duane is an icon as much as his creator.

• The Thalia Finale: Readers have followed the life of Duane through The Last Picture Show, Texasville, Duane’s Depressed, and When the Light Goes . Rhino Ranch, the final episode in Duane’s saga, represents the end of an era and is the most unusual and compelling novel in the series.

• Irony, ...

See more details below
Paperback
$12.52
BN.com price
(Save 16%)$15.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (82) from $1.99   
  • New (15) from $2.99   
  • Used (67) from $1.99   
Rhino Ranch

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.93
BN.com price

Overview

• Highly acclaimed, iconic author: Larry McMurtry is renowned for his elegiac prose, sharp wit, and engaging plotlines. His Thalia, Texas, series is among his most famous and Duane is an icon as much as his creator.

• The Thalia Finale: Readers have followed the life of Duane through The Last Picture Show, Texasville, Duane’s Depressed, and When the Light Goes . Rhino Ranch, the final episode in Duane’s saga, represents the end of an era and is the most unusual and compelling novel in the series.

• Irony, romance, and cycle of life: Duane comes back from a near-fatal heart attack to discover that his new neighbor has recently opened a rhino preserve on her property. As he watches his world change around him, he reminisces on love affairs past and the missed opportunities he now regrets. Rhino Ranch is a bittersweet and fitting end to this iconic series, a tribute to all of the emotion, hilarity, whimsy, and poignancy that readers have followed across decades.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A droll and poignant dramedy, Rhino Ranch is a near-perfect coda to the minor masterwork of Texas’s greatest novelist.”
Texas Monthly

“Nobody depicts the complexities of smalltown Texas life and the frailties of human relationships better than McMurtry.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

“[Duane] and his friends in the fictional Texas town of Thalia made me laugh and nearly made me cry, and they made me think about life…”—Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Publishers Weekly
McMurtry ends the west Texas saga of Duane Moore, begun in 1966 with The Last Picture Show, with a top-shelf blend of wit and insight, sharply defined characters and to-the-point prose. Duane, now in his late 60s, is a prosperous and retired widower, lonely in his hometown of Thalia, Tex. Then billionaire heiress K.K. Slater moves in and opens the Rhino Ranch, a sanctuary intended to rescue the nearly extinct African black rhinoceros. Slater is a strong-willed, independent woman whose mere presence upsets parochial Thalia, and Duane can’t quite figure her out. His two best buddies, Boyd Cotton and Bobby Lee Baxter, both work for Slater, and the three friends schmooze with the rich, talk about geezer sex, rat out local meth heads and try to keep track of a herd of rhinos. Mixed in with the humor and snappy dialogue are tender and poignant scenes as the women in Duane’s life die or drift away, and Duane befriends a rhino and realizes that his life has lost its purpose. Nobody depicts the complexities of smalltown Texas life and the frailties of human relationships better than McMurtry. (Aug.)
Kirkus Reviews
Duane Moore's depressed and a little horny-but not as horny as the black rhinoceroses that have entered his increasingly complicated life. Now in his late 60s, Duane has been with us since The Last Picture Show (1966). That was many volumes ago, McMurtry (Books: A Memoir, 2008, etc.) being a prolific chap, and Duane has had his ups and downs. This book catches him on a down. His friend Honor sums up his condition philosophically: "Many aging people feel marginal, to some degree. For decades they're at the center of things, and then one day they're not. They slip over to the sidelines." Duane has ample justification for being bummed. His wife, Annie Cameron of the fantastically wealthy Dallas Cameron clan, has some dirty little secrets that unfold across the novel's pages. The people he has grown up with are leaving the planet. He's living in Arizona, which makes him an outsider when he returns to the xenophobic little burg of Thalia, Texas. Duane's not as much of an outsider, however, as is K.K. Slater, another woman from Dallas with fantastic wealth (at least on paper) who has established a vast ranch in order to rescue the African black rhino from extinction. The sight of black rhinos brings out the peckerwoods, guns a-blazing; Satanists and South Africans also figure into the mix, as does an extremely compliant porn star and a few other odd ducks. The narrative gets a little, well, middling toward the middle; a couple of set pieces rely on setups just a little too convenient, even considering the smallness of small-town Texas. However, McMurtry ultimately ties up a whole skein of loose ends neatly, and the book closes lyrically with ineluctable sadness, life being in the end asuccession of small tragedies and occasional triumphs. A lovely, high-lonesome end to Duane's saga that also offers the possibility of more books to come-which readers will certainly hope McMurtry delivers.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439156407
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 6/1/2010
  • Pages: 278
  • Sales rank: 385,200
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Larry McMurtry

Larry McMurtry is the author of twenty-nine novels, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Lonesome Dove, three memoirs, two collections of essays, and more than thirty screenplays. He lives in Archer City, Texas.

Biography

Back in the late 60s, the fact that Larry McMurtry was not a household name was really a thorn in the side of the writer. To illustrate his dissatisfaction with his status, he would go around wearing a T-shirt that read "Minor Regional Novelist." Well, more than thirty books, two Oscar-winning screenplays, and a Pulitzer Prize later, McMurtry is anything but a minor regional novelist.

Having worked on his father's Texas cattle ranch for a great deal of his early life, McMurtry had an inborn fascination with the West, both its fabled history and current state. However, he never saw himself as a life-long rancher and aspired to a more creative career. He achieved this at the age of 25 when he published his first novel. Horseman, Pass By was a wholly original take on the classic western. Humorous, heartbreaking, and utterly human, this story of a hedonistic cowboy in contemporary Texas was a huge hit for the young author and even spawned a major motion picture starring Paul Newman called Hud just two years after its 1961 publication. Extraordinarily, McMurtry was even allowed to write the script, a rare honor for such a novice.

With such an auspicious debut, it is hard to believe that McMurtry ever felt as though he'd been slighted by the public or marginalized as a minor talent. While all of his books may not have received equal attention, he did have a number of astounding successes early in his career. His third novel The Last Picture Show, a coming-of-age-in-the-southwest story, became a genuine classic, drawing comparisons to J. D. Salinger and James Jones. In 1971, Peter Bogdonovich's screen adaptation of the novel would score McMurtry his first Academy award for his screenplay. Three years later, he published Terms of Endearment, a critically lauded urban family drama that would become a hit movie starring Jack Nicholson and Shirley MacLaine in 1985.

That year, McMurtry published what many believe to be his definitive novel. An expansive epic sweeping through all the legends and characters that inhabited the old west, Lonesome Dove was a masterpiece. All of the elements that made McMurtry's writing so distinguished -- his skillful dialogue, richly drawn characters, and uncanny ability to establish a fully-realized setting -- convened in this Pulitzer winning story of two retired Texas rangers who venture from Texas to Montana. The novel was a tremendous critical and commercial favorite, and became a popular miniseries in 1989.

Following the massive success of Lonesome Dove, Larry McMurtry's prolificacy grew. He would publish at least one book nearly every year for the next twenty years, including Texasville, a gut-wrenching yet hilarious sequel to The Last Picture Show, Buffalo Girls, a fictionalized account of the later days of Calamity Jane, and several non-fiction titles, such as Crazy Horse.

Interestingly, McMurtry would receive his greatest notoriety in his late 60s as the co-screenwriter of Ang Lee's controversial film Brokeback Mountain. The movie would score the writer another Oscar and become one of the most critically heralded films of 2005. The following year he published his latest novel. Telegraph Days is a freewheeling comedic run-through of western folklore and surely one of McMurtry's most inventive stories and enjoyable reads. Not bad for a "minor regional novelist."

Good To Know

A miniseries based on McMurtry's novel Comanche Moon is currently in production. McMurtry co-wrote the script.

The first-printing of McMurtry's novel In a Narrow Grave is one of his most obscure for a rather obscure reason. The book was withdrawn because the word "skyscrapers" was misspelled as "skycrappers" on page 105.

McMurtry comes from a long line of farmers and ranchers. His father and eight of his uncles were all in the profession.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Archer City, Texas
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 3, 1936
    2. Place of Birth:
      Wichita Falls, Texas
    1. Education:
      B.A., North Texas State University, 1958; M.A., Rice University, 1960. Also studied at Stanford University.

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 12, 2009

    Best McMurtry book in years

    Larry McMurtry is my favorite author, I have read all of his books but have found many of his recent books lacking his insightful prose. His character development has been top notch but he seemed to loose interest in the plot and characters after about 100 pages. Rhino Ranch was different,it was beautifully written from the first sentence to the last. I must admit I was wary about reading it. I was afraid Duane was going to suffer a terrible death via a Rhino attack. I felt like sending Larry a thank you letter when I finished the book - I wanted to thank him for letting Duane have such a peaceful passing and letting him be with such wonderful people in his final years.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2013

    Owners house

    Its a house.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2011

    Very disappointed

    I have loved this series until this last one. It looks like McMurtry just came back to end things without a lot of effort.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 24, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    With a tip of rhe hat to Jeff Bridges

    for bring Duane to life in 'The Last Picture Show' and effectively supplying the face of Duane for this and Duane's Depressed. Humble brilliance. You and Larry McMurtry make it look so simple,which is your magic. Larry's our greatest writer since Steinbeck, and Duane is his best character not named Gus or Woodrow. Thank you both so much for Duane's world.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 3, 2010

    I loved this book and am sad that it ends the life and times of Duane

    I've been with this series since the start - loving The Last Picture Show and every book after that. The characters are so quirky and offbeat - you can't help but like them. I didn't want this book to end because I knew it was the last of Duane. I've watched him evolve (for lack of a better word) over the years and will miss him. Keep on walking, Duane, my old friend. Rest in Peace.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Good Ending

    I'll miss Duane, but it was good ending and tying up of loose ends. You just gotta love McMurtry's characters lol

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2009

    This book was a failure from a talented author.

    I read this book for my brother. I prefer literature.I did read Duane's Depressed, because my brother said it explained him!! My brother is an extreme reader also..an actually will critique books far more critically then I do...but he likes Mr. McMurtry..too simplistic for my tastes..this book was a throw down item..far beneath his abilities..
    also..what about Your store..you have done wonderful things..why a book that was so marginal!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    It was absolutely awesome must read for fans of Larry McMurtry.

    I really found this book very hard to put down. Easy to read on a rainy day or while waiting for appointments. It is easy if you have to put it down to be able to recall where you were. BUT definitely not a book for the more wild west type readers. If you don't like romances you probally won't like this book as it caters more to the non-hardcore western who like a little of the west thrown in with romance.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The End

    All the books in the Thalia, Texas / Duane Moore series are brilliantly written by one of America's top authors. Rhino Ranch is no exception, and represents the period at the end of a long sentence McMurtry began writing over 40 years ago. If you can imagine a hybrid of the homespun humor of Norman Rockwell paintings, the existential bite of Albert Camus, and characters who adopted their sexual mores from Henry Miller and hillbillies, you have a head start on digesting these beautiful books. If you haven't already read the prequels to Rhino Ranch, consider starting with The Last Picture Show (in which Duane is a secondary character), or perhaps Texasville (in which Duane takes center stage), and be sure to squeeze in Duane's Depressed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Larry McMurtry continues to write stories that connect deeply.

    Reading an author exhaustively has its benefits and draw backs. Such a reader has an idea of how the story will be told while also expecting there to be a new tale in the telling. When an author revisits the same story, expanding it with each visit, the occasion for "freshness" becomes less a promise and more a (often distant) hope. Mr. McMurtry (considered by some [ME!] to be one of the United States greatest novelists) appeared to have been finished with The Last Picture Show "family" when he completed When the Light Goes, when this present book came to print it was purchased out of the reader's loyalty, with the expectation that he would be getting repeated events, spliced together, to create "depth" to the life of Duane Moore. What was found was a delightful, touching, often humorously poignant farewell to a story that began in the 1960's. This book is so good it merits comparison to Mr. McMurtry's best novel, Terms of Endearment, and that is high praise.
    Duane Moore, high school roughneck, Korean War Vet, Texas Oilman, millionaire, is returning home to Thalia after his most recent wife decided to live with her French lover. He finds "home" to be as typical as he left it - a closed minded, "mean, oil patch town" whose quiet history is being disrupted by its future incarnation is as a rescue preserve for African Black Rhinos. It turns out this "Rhino Ranch" is a mere back drop for the telling of the end of Duane's life. By the time Duane dies (this is NOT a plot spoiler) it is anticlimactic, giving color to the life he lived that ran its due course; the reader is left with the warm feeling that Duane did not stop living. He just moved on.
    The book could be considered a novella, as the chapters are short and there are many blank spaces at the end of many of the chapters. The characters dance across the pages of this book, an expected characteristic of Mr. McMurtry's writing. K. K. Slater, trust-fund billionaire, who is the primary funding source for the Rhino project; Boyd Cotton, cowboy "top hand" who now rides herd on rhinos and the African antelope who keep them company; Casey Kincaid, a spoiled, sex-driven secretary; Double Aught, the Black Rhino bull who seems to appear and disappear at will are but a few of the people-pictures who populate the modern Thalia. All of these characters are interesting, even though many of them appear for only a few pages in the book.
    Readers would be well served if they had a familiarity with the story before picking up this section, as many of the under tales from previous novels are mentioned and add much to the present story. However, this is a good read in itself. Reading the proceeding four novels will possibly cause an addiction to McMurtry to be formed, so the literates are forewarned. This is a novel with a lot of "adult" language and situations; these play to the character development and are not gratuitous. It is a story of good-byes following 100 years of living, loving and being in "place."
    There is much autobiography in this tale, as is true of all engaging writing. Mr. McMurtry is aging, has experienced heart attacks, by-pass surgery and seems to be saying "good-bye" to what he has known and holds dear. I am glad he has invited me to be a part of such a lengthy, exciting, varied journey through his imagination. I also hope this is not his last novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A fitting last chapter to the series. Easily a free standing book for a Larry Mc. Fan. But read them all.

    A fun read. Short chapters so you can put it down often enough but I didn't want to, ever. An easy and quick read but I read passages over and over.
    In Larry's classic style, the characters are real, fascinating, and full of life.
    If you like Larry, you'll love Rhino Ranch. The first chapter will grab your smile bone!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)