Ribbon of Sand: The Amazing Convergence of the Ocean and the Outer Banks

Ribbon of Sand: The Amazing Convergence of the Ocean and the Outer Banks

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by John Alexander, James Lazell
     
 

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Wind, currents, tides, and sand. Kingsnakes and rice rats. The disappearance of the Lost Colony, the raids of the pirate Blackbeard, and the Wright brothers' first attempts at flight. The Outer Banks is a place like no other.

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Overview

Wind, currents, tides, and sand. Kingsnakes and rice rats. The disappearance of the Lost Colony, the raids of the pirate Blackbeard, and the Wright brothers' first attempts at flight. The Outer Banks is a place like no other.

Editorial Reviews

In Southern Words
Whether describing Nature's part in Blackbeard's dramatic last battle or explaining the environmental issues of today's coast, this fine book paints a distinct portrait of a delicate ecosystem and how humans have forever affected it.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
North Carolina's Outer Banks region, 180 miles of shifting sands, has both a romantic past--including the lost colony of Roanoke Island, the Wright brothers, pirates and shipwrecks--and a unique natural history. Alexander, a former newspaper editor, and naturalist Lazell, president of the Conservation Agency, examine this fragile ecosystem and unravel an evolutionary mystery. Explaining the actions of ocean currents, winds and waves, they show how island contours change, how inlets open and close. They describe the fauna and flora of maritime forests and beaches and search for a rare Ocracoke king snake, sticticeps. Their finding it yields an engrossing story of field science and discloses a remarkable example of relatively recent co-evolution (snake, rice rat, warmyrtle) . The authors also chart the changes brought by development of the island. As natural history or as description of barrier islands, this book leaves the reader with a clear sense of place and an understanding of the forces of wind and water. Illustrations. (May)
Library Journal
In a popular style of science writing that will appeal to lay readers, the authors discuss the history, geography, and ecology of North Carolina's Outer Banks in the context of barrier island geology and ecology. Among the topics they explore are the interactions of wind, sea, sand, and land on the Outer Banks, the influence of the Gulf Stream, geological development, and the ecological role of the maritime forest. Line drawings of native flora and fauna and maps (not seen) accompany the text. Alexander, a journalist, and Lazell, a scientist, love the unspoiled Outer Banks and warn of possible threats to the area. A useful supplement to more specialized studies (Orrin H. Pilkey's From Currituck to Calabash, Duke Univ. Pr, 1982, and Paul V. Godfrey's Barrier Island Ecology of Cape Lookout National Seashore and Vicinity, N. Carolina, G.P.O., 1976), this work is suitable for natural history collections in public and academic libraries.-- Judith B. Barnett, Pell Marine Science Lib., Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston
Booknews
A fascinating account of the natural and human history and the ecology of the elongated beaches of the Outer Banks of North Carolina, which stretch down the Atlantic Coast a hundred miles to the lighthouse at Cape Hatteras, then southwestward in an 80-mile arc to Cape Lookout--islands of sand, never more than a few miles wide. Lightly illustrated. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781616202897
Publisher:
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
Publication date:
05/01/1992
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
254
File size:
4 MB

What People are saying about this

Tom D. Crouch
A delight and an education....Fixing their vision on the intersection of natural and human history, the authors offer compelling insights into the past, present, and future of the Outer Banks.
—(Tom D. Crouch, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution )

Meet the Author


John Alexander has worked as a journalist and is now president of the Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, North Carolina.

James Lazell is president of The Conservation Agency and lives in Jamestown, Rhode Island.

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