Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier [NOOK Book]

Overview

Blending exclusive interviews with Rachel Robinson, Mack Robinson (Jackie's brother), Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Ralph Kiner and others, celebrated author Harvey Frommer evokes the lives of Brooklyn Dodgers manager Branch Rickey and heralded baseball player Jackie Robinson to describe how they worked together to shatter baseball's color line. Rickey and Robinson is a dual biography tracing the convergence of the lives of two of baseball's most influential individuals ...
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Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

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Overview

Blending exclusive interviews with Rachel Robinson, Mack Robinson (Jackie's brother), Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Ralph Kiner and others, celebrated author Harvey Frommer evokes the lives of Brooklyn Dodgers manager Branch Rickey and heralded baseball player Jackie Robinson to describe how they worked together to shatter baseball's color line. Rickey and Robinson is a dual biography tracing the convergence of the lives of two of baseball's most influential individuals in a special moment in sports and cultural history. To this day, their bravery and determination continues to shape the sociological perspectives of the sports world. Now in a new paperback edition!
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781461740971
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing
  • Publication date: 4/17/2003
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 1,144,609
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Harvey Frommer has written 29 books and over 600 artivcles, mostly on sports subjects. The author of the classic New York City Baseball: 1947-1957 and the bestselling Throwing Heat, Nolan Ryan's autobiography, he is professor of English in the City University of New York. Frommer lives with his family in North Woodmere, Long Island.
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Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Acknowledgments xi
1 The Meeting 1
2 Pasadena: The Making of an All-American 17
3 Ohio: Pioneer Stock 35
4 St. Louis 47
5 Building Days in Brooklyn 80
6 The Color Bar Drops 96
7 The Signing 108
8 Number 42 131
9 The Mahatma in Charge 150
10 Changing Roles 160
11 Speaking Out 175
12 Winding Down 190
13 The Final Years 205
Afterword 231
Appendix 233
Box Score of Jackie Robinson's First Game
Jackie Robinson's Playing Record
Branch Rickey's Playing Record
Branch Rickey's Managing Record
Index 235
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 12 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 16, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Tip of the Iceberg If you too recently watched 42 and are lookin

    Tip of the Iceberg
    If you too recently watched 42 and are looking to learn more about Jackie Robinson or Branch Rickey, this book is a start... It's certainly better written and more interesting than Branch Rickey (Penguin Books). Author Frommer structures the book as parallel biographies of the two men, their stories overlapping and lives knitting together for that remarkable period of years when they, almost by themselves, integrated major league baseball.

    I have concluded however, that my favorite book on this topic is the first memoir by Jackie Robinson: My Own Story. It was hard to find, but worth the search. It was written with the help of Wendell Smith, who was clearly a friend and advocate for Robinson. It's also interesting to think that its words are the closest to Robinson's thoughts and memories as he and Branch Rickey broke the color barrier in baseball.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2004

    WONDERFUL BOOK, A MUST READ

    'A vivid account of how Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey shattered baseball's age old color line. A must read for baseball fans everywhere. A wonderful book so ably pulled together by noted baseball historian and journalist Harvey Frommer.'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    ******************************************************** Professional athletes are probably no more ignorant of history than the rest of us, but there was something especially disturbing about the number of modern players who, in 1997, during the fiftieth anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the baseball color line, revealed that they didn't know who he was. Pollsters probably didn't ask, but it's likely even fewer would have known who Branch Rickey was. That black players in particular, whose careers follow the path that these men blazed, do not comprehend and honor the debt is most troubling of all. Anyone wishing to remedy their own lack of knowledge, and even those who think they already know the whole story, will find Harvey Frommer's Rickey and Robinson an invaluable resource and a truly moving read. Mr. Frommer had the novel idea of structuring the book as parallel biographies of the two men, their stories overlapping and lives knitting together for that remarkable period of years when they, almost by themselves, integrated major league baseball. Jackie Robinson's is the better known tale, from UCLA to the Army to the Negro Leagues to the Dodgers' minor leagues and then to Brooklyn, with a significant career in business and politics afterwards. And most baseball fans will be familiar with Branch Rickey's reputation as an innovator, his most lasting contributions, besides integration, to the game including the batting helmet and the organized minor league farm system. Met fans too will recall Ralph Kiner's stories about how tight-fisted and patronizing (in both the positive and negative senses) Rickey was with his players. But Mr. Frommer gives us a full picture of the man, of his religious background (which seems to have played no small part in his willingness to be a racial pioneer), his keen mind for the game and for business, and his endless maneuvering to improve his teams. Each man led a life full enough to support a biography of his own. Here we get both and they're fascinating. But the event that defined their lives was the meeting on August 28, 1945, at Brooklyn Dodgers headquarters, between Rickey and Robinson. It's astonishing to realize that this first time the men ever met, Branch Rickey asked Jackie Robinson to take on the daunting task of being the first black man to play organized white baseball (at least since the color bar had been erected decades earlier). But Rickey had made a true project of the whole idea, had scouted the Negro Leagues and the personal backgrounds of the prospective players thoroughly, and he knew Robinson was uniquely well-suited-- by his ability, his intelligence, his education, his relatively middle-class California upbringing, and his temperament, desire, and will--to bear the burdens. And so 'The Meeting' was not just a get acquainted session, but an opportunity for Rickey to probe and to prepare Robinson, even to the point of demonstrating the kind of taunts he should expect to hear, before offering him the bittersweet role of, as he put it: 'carrying the reputation of a race on your shoulders.' The whole book is enjoyable but it is this chapter that really sings. The Meeting has been the subject of books, film, stageplay, and more, but it's never been told better than here, with high drama and a sense of history, but also with an immediacy that makes the reader feel like he's a fly on the wall in Rickey's office those sixty years ago. No one can understand what happened in baseball and in American society over those sixty years without knowing the story of Rickey and Robinson and, Mr. Frommer having given us such a rewarding and readable book about the men and their noble achievement, there's no excuse for not knowing it. *****************************************************

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    Harvey Frommer's Rickey and Robinson, recently re-released in paperback (Taylor Trade Publishing, $18.95), has lost none of its poignancy in the two decades that have elapsed since the first edition in 1982. The new forward by Hall of Famer Monte Irvin underscores the history lesson that none of us should ever forget: Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey made Michael Jordan and Jim Brown and Wilt Chamberlain and a host of other African-American athletic superstars' careers possible. Sure, the color line was bound to fall at some point, but this story is more than just a case of being in the right place at the right time. As Frommer details in Rickey and Robinson, Branch Rickey spent years planning the 'stunt' he pulled on 15 April 1947. He had a seven-step plan that started way back in 1943, that had been carefully orchestrated, with the player painstakingly chosen, at the expense of great financial and other resources, to maximize the possibility of the Experiment's success. Frommer's book outlines not just the events of the meeting of these two men, but starts you out with their respective upbringings, their backgrounds and histories, so that the reades has the feeling that he has at least known, if not lived, some of the joys and hardships of these two mens lives even before the events that would forever associate their names int he record books. You get to learn about Robinson's family history in Georgia, and upbringing in southern California, as well as his exploits in collegiate sports and the Negro leagues. You get to learn about Branch Rickey's country bumpkin background, his religious and political convictions, and his achievements in St. Louis before he ever came to Brooklyn. You even get to learn what each of them did after they left the Dodgers organization, how their passions drove them to strive for what they believed in even when most ordinary men would simply have conceded to diabetes, or retirement. For that matter, you may get a little too much in the way of details. Make no mistake, Frommer's thorough and engaging research is a trademark of his work. His quotes from Rachel Robinson, Roy Campanella, Walter O'Malley, Irving Rudd, Mal Goode, Pee Wee Reese, Monte Irvin, and so many others help the reader to feel like he's getting a first-hand account of the events from those who lived them. Heck, I guess you are. But if you start reading the book hoping only to learn what Jackie's first year was like, you'll be in way over your head. Besides, you should know better than to think that Frommer would leave you with so truncated an account of such a significant occurrence in American History. Shame on you. The book, as always, is well written. Eloquent without being excessively verbose (I suppose I could learn a thing or two about writing from Frommer myself!), Frommer is nothing if not a great author, and shows no disdain for the vernacular. But he also has a sense of the importance of his subject, and does not leave stones unturned where there are questions. He doesn not play up mythological events (like Reese's alleged gesture of freindship toward Robinson in Cincinnati) and does not seem to take a side on most of the political and personal conflicts depicted in the book. In all, this seems a fair and even-handed account, if not without Frommer's (also trademarked) slant toward new York sports. Can't say that I blame him. Now more than thirty years after Robinson's death at the age of only 53, more athletes, not just the black ones, would be well served to remember the debt they owe these two great men. Reading Rickey and Robinson would be a good start.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    A REVIEW OF `RICKEY AND ROBINSON¿ By FRED CLAIRE The photograph captures the moment. Jackie Robinson shaking hands with Branch Rickey after the two men had written their signatures on a contract to enable Jackie to play for the Brooklyn Dodgers. It was a defining moment for Major League Baseball as the color barrier came tumbling down. The significance of the signing went beyond the baseball field. Indeed, the impact of the signing carried across the country to help shape our society. Whereas the picture of Robinson and Rickey seems to have stopped time, Harvey Frommer has delivered the moving story of the two men in his book ¿Rickey and Robinson.¿ Frommer delivers the story of the amazing Mr. Rickey from his background in growing up in Ohio to his emergence as a leading figure in Major League Baseball. Rickey was a man of intelligence and of great vision who had a passion for the game of baseball. Robinson was a gifted athlete whose great skills showed early in his life and came to the forefront as a three-sport letterman at UCLA. There wasn¿t anything Jackie couldn¿t do on a baseball field or a football field or on a basketball court. Jackie Robinson, however, was more than a great athlete. He was a man driven to make a difference and to help others. Robinson and Rickey came from very different backgrounds but they came to share a vision of what they could accomplish by working together. Robinson¿s career with the Dodgers lasted only ten years, from 1947 through 1956, but in that period the team reached the World Series six times and won its first World Series title in 1955. Frommer captures the story of Rickey¿s plan to have Robinson break the color barrier and dramatically change the game of baseball. Rickey planned every move along the way for Robinson but he realized at the outset that Jackie would have to be a true partner for the plan to succeed. Robinson was the right man. His talent couldn¿t be denied. He was strong and gifted enough to handle the assignment of playing in the Majors while withstanding the abuse from both the opponents and the fans. He even had to cope with the prejudice of some of his own teammates. Frommer doesn¿t overlook the person who was with Jackie all the way, the remarkable Rachel Robinson. He also captures the period of time and provides a look at what Major League baseball and our society was all about as Jackie emerged on the national scene. Rickey provided the outline for what Robinson was to face and the Dodger executive provided unwavering support. Two men, so very different in so many ways, formed an alliance that changed our country for the better and continues to shape the world of sports. It is appropriate that plaques of Rickey and Robinson are placed in the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY. They represent the proudest moment in the history of Major League Baseball. (Fred Claire was a member of the Dodgers¿ front office from 1969 through 1998, serving the team as Executive Vice-President and General Manager.)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    "My great respect, gratitude and warmth for your scholarly work and to preserving the legacy of my dear husband." {Refers to First Edition}

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    'Nice book, one that really documents the great event of breaking the color line. It is a story that young people especially need to read about. Harvey Frommer really gets into the true impact of the breaking of the color line.'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    'Terrific book. So much fascinating material. A lot of it is just unbelievable.'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    "Whether you lived the period or merely heard about it, you'll enjoy it even more if you read Frommer's book." (Refers to first edition)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    "Frommer's analysis of Rickey's motives sets book apart...raises all the right questions in interesting ways." (Refers to First Edition)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    "Thorough research, a vivid account."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2003

    Rickey and Robinson: The Men who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier

    It is one of my favorite books by one of my favorite sports authors. It should be required reading for all those who want to know more about Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey and the breaking of baseball's color line that long ago year of 1947.

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