Rickshaw Girl

Rickshaw Girl

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by Mitali Perkins, Jamie Hogan
     
 

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Naima is a talented painter of traditional alpana patterns, which Bangladeshi women and girls paint on their houses for special celebrations. But Naima is not satisfied just painting alpana. She wants to help earn money for her family, like her best friend, Saleem, does for his family. When Naima's rash effort to help puts her family deeper in debt, she draws on her… See more details below

Overview

Naima is a talented painter of traditional alpana patterns, which Bangladeshi women and girls paint on their houses for special celebrations. But Naima is not satisfied just painting alpana. She wants to help earn money for her family, like her best friend, Saleem, does for his family. When Naima's rash effort to help puts her family deeper in debt, she draws on her resourceful nature and her talents to bravely save the day. Includes a glossary of Bangla words and an author's note about a changing Bangladesh and microfinance.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Claudia Mills
In Naima's Bangladeshi village, girls paint alpanas, patterned decorations adorning the pathways on special occasions, and boys drive rickshaws. Naima fiercely resents the fact that she is unable to do any work that would help her impoverished family survive: "All that a girl could do was cook, clean, wash clothes, and decorate. . . Painting alpanas wouldn't help Father get rest. Or add to their earnings. It was a waste of time." When Naima tries to drive her father's beautiful new rickshaw, disaster ensues, and the family's only source of livelihood is ruined—all Naima's fault for her heedless attempt at helping. While this twist of the story is almost unbearably heartbreaking, Perkins, who was born in India and lived for a while in Bangladesh, manages to make everything come right, as Naima's artistic skills prove unexpectedly valuable, after all. Readers will share in Naima's hopes and disappointments, and will appreciate the love and loyalty of her family, while vicariously experiencing what it is like to live in contemporary Bangladesh in a time of transitioning gender roles. Hogan's accompanying illustrations complement the story effectively and provide accurate renderings of the alpanas Naima loves to paint.
Kirkus Reviews
Money is tight, and Naima wants to do something to help her family. If only she were a boy like her friend Saleem, she'd be able to drive her father's rickshaw and add to the family's income. Naima does have a special talent; she can paint beautiful alpacas-traditional patterns used by women to decorate Bangladeshi homes during special occasions-but how can this help her make money? When Naima decides to disguise herself as a boy and drive the rickshaw, she accidentally crashes it, and the family's debt soars even higher. Now Naima is more determined then ever to help her family-and prove that being a girl can be a good thing. Straightforward black-and-white pastel illustrations incorporate alpaca patterns and depict various elements of Naima's daily life, and a helpful Bangla glossary and informative notes are included. A child-eye's view of Bangladesh that makes a strong and accessible statement about heritage, tradition and the changing role of women, Naima's story will be relished by students and teachers alike. (Fiction. 7-10)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781607345077
Publisher:
Charlesbridge
Publication date:
06/17/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
566,914
File size:
6 MB
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

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