Riddle-iculous Math

Riddle-iculous Math

5.0 1
by Joan Holub, Regan Dunnick
     
 

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“What’s the number of states in the U.S.A. minus the number of days in the month of May minus the number of paws on a grizzly bear minus the number of legs on the spider in your hair? Spider!?! Eeeek!” The answer to this and other math questions can be found in this funny book of riddles and jokes. Children can learn basic math skills while

Overview


“What’s the number of states in the U.S.A. minus the number of days in the month of May minus the number of paws on a grizzly bear minus the number of legs on the spider in your hair? Spider!?! Eeeek!” The answer to this and other math questions can be found in this funny book of riddles and jokes. Children can learn basic math skills while reading about animal sleepover parties, cafeteria food fights, and a boy who made more than 5 million dollars in one month!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781497648067
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
04/22/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
851,167
File size:
24 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author


Joan Holub is the author and/or illustrator of over one hundred thirty books for children, including Apple Countdown and Wagons Ho! She is also the author of the acclaimed Goddess Girls series (coauthored with Suzanne Williams), which includes twelve titles such as Athena the BrainMedusa the Mean, and Aphrodite the Diva.
 
 
 

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I teach grade 3, and my students have enjoyed Riddle-iculous Math thoroughly. We like having the instant gratification of the answers tucked just below the riddles. (I've seen some riddle books with answers in mirror-writing or upside down, and that soon discourages some kids.) The riddles have a lot of truly clever humor and the bright, energetic art has a lot of kid appeal. My least favorite is probably the metric page. Other than that, I love this book. There's plenty of silly humor as in (What was a 12-inch ruler called in ancient Egypt? A short pharoah.) (What's a math teacher's favorite dessert? A pie chart.) But there's also plenty of math to be learned here in settings that are familiar ground for kids, such as an egg and spoon race, a pajama party, a pet store, a food fight. The idea of a boy named Bing who became rich as a king by doubling a penny every day of the month was especially intriguing. A great teaching tool and a fun read. I give this book two thumbs way up!