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Riddle-Iculous Math
     

Riddle-Iculous Math

5.0 1
by Joan Holub, Regan Dunnick (Illustrator)
 

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Lots of silly math questions can be found in this funny book of riddles and jokes. Children can learn basic math skills while reading about animal sleepover parties, cafeteria food fights, and a boy who made more than 5 million dollars in one month!

Overview


Lots of silly math questions can be found in this funny book of riddles and jokes. Children can learn basic math skills while reading about animal sleepover parties, cafeteria food fights, and a boy who made more than 5 million dollars in one month!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A collection of funny, corny, and sometimes challenging riddles and rhymes based on math."

School Library Journal

Children's Literature
What is a math teacher's favorite game? Divide and seek. Add the number of wheels on a bus plus the number of arms on an octopus plus a lot more crazy things and you get some strange math teacher-all illustrated in cartoon whimsy by Regan Dunnick. This silly book will delight young math whizzes and make math practice a bit more tolerable for the less-than-whizzes. Every page is filled with riddles that enable children to practice adding, subtracting, counting money, skip counting and solving problems: "If Mr. and Ms. Sweet-za only shared with Pete and Lisa, what fraction of the pizza would each get to eat-za? One-fourth. If Mr. and Ms. Sweet-za refused to share their pizza, what fraction of the pizza would each of them eat-za? One-half." The biggest disadvantage is that the answers are red-lettered just below the riddles-you might want to have a sticky note handy to cover up the answers so readers a chance to figure them out first. Riddle-iculous is perfect for extra credit or extra practice in the classroom and fun at home as well. 2003, Albert Whitman, Ages 5 to 10.
— Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
There are some good laughs and some corny groaners in this amusing resource full of brainteasers. Write one on the board each morning, or have students pair up to write their own. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807549964
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
01/01/2003
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I teach grade 3, and my students have enjoyed Riddle-iculous Math thoroughly. We like having the instant gratification of the answers tucked just below the riddles. (I've seen some riddle books with answers in mirror-writing or upside down, and that soon discourages some kids.) The riddles have a lot of truly clever humor and the bright, energetic art has a lot of kid appeal. My least favorite is probably the metric page. Other than that, I love this book. There's plenty of silly humor as in (What was a 12-inch ruler called in ancient Egypt? A short pharoah.) (What's a math teacher's favorite dessert? A pie chart.) But there's also plenty of math to be learned here in settings that are familiar ground for kids, such as an egg and spoon race, a pajama party, a pet store, a food fight. The idea of a boy named Bing who became rich as a king by doubling a penny every day of the month was especially intriguing. A great teaching tool and a fun read. I give this book two thumbs way up!