A Ride into Morning: The Story of Tempe Wick [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Revolutionary War is raging. Food and firewood are scarce, and Tempe Wick is worried that she will not be able to care for her ailing mother and her family and still maintain the farm. Her ability to hold on to her world is threatened when a mutinous soldier demands that she lend him her beloved horse in exchange for keeping her brother’s rum-smuggling activities secret from the authorities. This dramatic historical novel is based on a real...
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A Ride into Morning: The Story of Tempe Wick

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Overview

The Revolutionary War is raging. Food and firewood are scarce, and Tempe Wick is worried that she will not be able to care for her ailing mother and her family and still maintain the farm. Her ability to hold on to her world is threatened when a mutinous soldier demands that she lend him her beloved horse in exchange for keeping her brother’s rum-smuggling activities secret from the authorities. This dramatic historical novel is based on a real event that has been popularized into American legend.

When unrest spreads at the Revolutionary War camp in Morristown, New Jersey, under the command of General Anthony Wayne, a young woman cleverly hides her horse from the mutinous soldiers who have need of it.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This is an exciting, adventurous story about Tempe Wick, a true historical figure, as told through the eyes of her young fourteen-year-old cousin, Mary Cooper. Mary's family sends her to live with Tempe's family during the Revolutionary War, because her patriotic leanings provoke her Tory family. In the middle of the war, this story recounts Tempe's great love of her horse, Colonial, who remains the only thing Tempe has that reminds her of her dead father. The war and her father's death have made Tempe outwardly hard, independent and bitter. However, she puts up this independent attitude in order to survive the awful circumstances. During this time of war, many people are sick, and food is scarce. Also, people talk of mutiny in the camps, and during a strange twist of events, Mary and Tempe find themselves in the middle of a possible mutiny. Tempe, however, has been deceived, and she almost unwittingly allows her good name to be associated with mutiny. In the end, we see that Tempe is not the insensitive, spoiled person she appears to be; she has put on those facades to deal with the war and her father's absence in her life. This entertaining and historically accurate book portrays the horrors of war. Mary's analysis of human nature and her ability to understand the war's impact on those around her offer a thought-provoking statement about the importance of maintaining peace and being true to oneself regardless of the circumstance. 2004, St Martin's Griffin, Ages 10 to 14.
—Kara E. Nichols
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547351520
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 4/18/1995
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 825,667
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 184 KB

Meet the Author

ANN RINALDI is an award-winning author best known for bringing history vividly to life. A self-made writer and newspaper columnist for twenty-one years, Ms. Rinaldi attributes her interest in history to her son, who enlisted her to take part in historical reenactments up and down the East Coast. She lives with her husband in central New Jersey. Visit her online at www.annrinaldi.com.

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Reading Group Guide

1. Civil wars divide families. How has it divided the families in this story?

2. Abraham tells Mary that compromise is a necessary commodity, but not all the characters agree. How do Mary, Tempe, and General Wayne feel about compromise? How do you feel about it? When should you compromise, and when should you stand firm?

3. What does Mary mean when she says that everyone is part and parcel of the whole of their life experiences? In what ways have your life experiences determined who you are now?

4. Mary tells Henry, "Sometimes it helps to air old ills in the sunlight." What does she mean?

5. Tempe believes that a person's motives do not matter as much as their actions. Do you think one is more important than the other? Why?

6. In what ways might Henry's living as a lunatic make his life easier? Harder?

7. Abraham advises Mary that "those closest to the problem cannot see the solution." Do you think this is true? Who can you turn to when you have a problem?

8. In his letter to Mary, Abraham says, "I choose to look at the past fondly and to the future with hope." Why might he choose to see things this way? How should he handle his unhappy memories?

Copyright (c) 2003. Published in the U.S. by Harcourt, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

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(7)

4 Star

(4)

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(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2006

    Imagine You Are There

    The narrator, Mary Cooper, is staying with her cousin, Tempe Wick, and her Aunt Mary during the Revolutionary War. They are Patriot, and Mary's family is Tory. They sent her to live with the Wicks during the war. Tempe has a short temper, and is always arguing with Mary. General Wayne's army is camped on the Wick farm. Before Tempe's father died a few days before the story begins, he did as much as he could to help the army. Tempe never approved and believes it killed him. Tempe has a favorite horse named Colonel, and he plays a big role in the story. He is the most beautiful and fastest horse in the area, and Tempe rides him every day. There are many rumors in camp about mutiny. Billy Bowzar from the 11th Regiment, who also has an important role, insists they are only writing down their grievances to present to Wayne. Mary overhears a conversation between Tempe and Bowzar one night. He wanted to borrow Colonel to ride on when they presented their grievances. Tempe has to decide whether to take part or to stay out of the war.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2012

    Tap right here ¿

    All of Ann Rinaldi's books are really good.
    I hav'nt read this one yet.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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