Riders of the Purple Sage: A Classic Western Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview

Riders of the Purple Sage was originally written in 1912 by Zane Grey and widely known as his best and famous Western novel. Most of reviewers agree that this novel shaped the formula of the popular Western fiction.

Reader Review;

This is the only western I've ever read; I'm mostly into classical literature, science writing, and ...
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Riders of the Purple Sage: A Classic Western Novel

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Overview

Riders of the Purple Sage was originally written in 1912 by Zane Grey and widely known as his best and famous Western novel. Most of reviewers agree that this novel shaped the formula of the popular Western fiction.

Reader Review;

This is the only western I've ever read; I'm mostly into classical literature, science writing, and non-fiction, but I asked friends for a book rec in the field, and they said read this one and the two Thomas Berger novels about Little Big Man.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781105337680
  • Publisher: Lulu.com
  • Publication date: 12/9/2011
  • Sold by: LULU PRESS
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 165,324
  • File size: 536 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 75 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(39)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(15)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 76 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    To "Do Your research first"

    To "Do Your Reserach First" I say that YOU should do your research first into Mormon history before commenting on a novel that even Mormon historians and artists hail as a great work of American literature. I am a Mormon, a BYU graduate and a Mormon historians myself. Every point you made about 19th century Utah Mormon culture, church governments and history in your review below is incorrect. Obviously you are either an LDS convert or you've done little if any reserach into your own history. The so-called "Avenging Angels" (Danites) of Pioneer Utah WERE a reality. Bill Hickman and Porter Rockwell were among the most famous of them--and among the most famous (and violent) Gun fighters of the old West. You also seem to overlook that the portrayal of the Mormons in "Riders of the Purple Sage" is mostly positive. The heroin IS a Mormon and REMAINS a Mormon. Since the novel is set in 1870's Utah where 99% of the population was Mormon, it makes complete sense that both the "Good guys" and the "bad guys" in the novel should BOTH be Mormons. When I attended Brigham Young University in the 1980s and took a class in Mormon Literature, "Riders of the Purple Sage" was required reading. <BR/>Zane Grey spent a great deal of his life living in "Mormon Country" (the Rocky Mountain states where Mormons then made up the majority of the population.) He knew what he was writing about.<BR/><BR/>Now for everyone else reading this: If you want to know the origin of the Western novel read "Riders of the Pruple Sage." It is THE book that created the genre. (And other Mormons should be proud that the FIRST American Western is a Mormon story. Mormons were--after all--the first white Americans to settle in the western states.)

    9 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A glimpse into a past almost forgotten

    The rugged West was once a great hunger for the United States. The Western was gobbled up by young and old and the spirit of adventure was very much alive. As time has progressed and technology has sped up all processes to hyper speed - the West and its adventure have become dusty and old.

    As I get older, I yearn for the 'old days' and crave to know what it was like to live in the time of the pioneers. Reading Riders of the Purple Sage allowed me to take a glimpse into a rough and tumble past and explore a region and time I will never get to experience.

    Its hard to imagine a time when the law of the land was the one with the biggest gun and the best shooting. Or a time when women had few, if any options to them and were essentially at the mercy of the men around them.

    As fascinating as the characters in the book - what I got from Riders of the Sage was the raw majesty of the land surrounding them. The Sage, the cliffs, the towns became characters for me within the book. Even if I were to travel to the far flung areas that were once the border of the Western frontier; it would not be the same. Time and technology will have invariably changed it as it has all of the world.

    Zane Grey brought to life the stark nature of the West and its people. I think it is time for us to explore a little bit of what we once were as a country - even if it is through a little great fiction. Zane Grey had a great way of capturing the West and giving us a glimpse into how it was won.

    While many who read the book might rail at the portrayal of Mormonism - I didn't really see it as a study of the religion. Merely one viewpoint of Mormonism at the time. I found meaning in the 10,000 foot view as it were - and saw it as a great 'study' of the West.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2008

    Excellent reading...

    This was the first of three Zane Grey books that I read in the last month. Having visited the south west recently for the first time, these books really came alive for me. I plan to read every Zane Grey book that I can get my hands on and reccommend his books highly.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 22, 2011

    Wrong!

    The type on this version is too small. When I bumped the font size up one notch it was then too big.

    I don't recommend this version. Buy the $0.99 version instead.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Great For Limited Eyesight

    My father, who is 104, loves Zane Grey and loved this book. With the large print it made it easy for him to read and enjoy. He loves to read these books over and over and I am sure this one will be read many times. The paperback version was a lot easier for him to handle as well.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2007

    Zane Grey or Charles Dickens?

    Not since A Tale of Two Cities have I read an author with such command of the English language. Perhaps what sets Grey apart from most other authors is his description of action. One of the chase scenes is absolutely breathtaking. And when I closed the book, I said aloud, 'Wow, that was perfect.'

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2004

    RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE IS BASED UPON REAL HISTORY

    I read this book when I was in college as part of a course on Specialty Writing. Zane Gray and Louis L'Amour were both held up as the writers who defined the genre of the Western. Not only is this a great novel, it IS a historically accurate one! Notwithstanding people who want to ignore the often extremely bloody history of the Mormon church, this book simply tells it like it is! Zane writes this books against the backdrop of a religion that had Avenging Angels to enforce the will of Brigham Young. That's even in the Mormon written histories! These weren't just a few 'excommunicated' renegades. No! These were sanctioned bullies who killed and beat and burned their way into history. Let's not forget that the United States government sent troops to deal with the polygamous tyrants who ran Utah. That was the Utah War. We should not rewrite history to make certain folks feel better. That's not right. If we can talk about the Spanish Inquisition for the Catholics or the murder of innocent men, women, children and religious by King Henry the 8th or the cruelties supported by the Southern Baptists during the Jim Crow days down South, then I'm afraid that a well written, novel on a bunch of bully boys is in order too. This is a well done novel full of suspense and action and TRUTH with only the names changed to protect the very guilty.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 21, 2011

    Beautiful language

    Westerns are not my thing, but the author uses beautiiful language. Ending is a bit sudden, but made me interested in the sequel, "the Rainbow Bridge."

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2012

    Great book

    Love the setting

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2011

    AWESOME

    SO REAL..

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 22, 2011

    Great! Five Stars *****

    This classic is an easy read. You won't be able to put it down. From the first encounter you know exactly who the bad guys and the good guys are.

    Formated well. Backbround shading works. Good editing job. Good Book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2014

    The author wrote a sensative story too accompany a scenic journey.

    Loved the descriptions of nature and of humanity.
    In true American style story telling, the ending was a happy one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 27, 2015

    I Also Recommend:

    Entertaining and memorable, but I'll never recommend it. My mai

    Entertaining and memorable, but I'll never recommend it.

    My main complaint is that  Zane Grey only knows one way to describe the sage: it's purple. And if I have to read &quot;and close forever the outlet to Deception Pass&quot; I will gouge out my eyes. When writers use a phrase like that enough that I notice it, it is a bad thing.

    I read this because I recently discovered the western genre and Zane Grey's name is plastered all over recommended western lists and apparently this is his best western. If that's so, I don't think I'll be reading another of his books. Elmore Leonard wrote way better Westerns.

    As a Mormon, I would have been a little offended at his depiction of my religion if it weren't so laughably inaccurate. I'm not denying that after being driven out of the United States by mobs and into the middle of nowhere, some men may have violently defended their rights. And maybe they got used to that and ended up going too far. And there may have been corrupt leaders, but it's like Grey had only heard of a religious group called Mormons who settled the desert and who practiced polygamy. And that's where his knowledge stopped. The rest he made up to tell a story. So if you read this book, remember Grey was not a Mormon and take his depiction with a grain (or the whole shaker) of salt.

    Whatever. The general plot was pretty good and the imagery was great. I liked how some people died you wish hadn't and some lived who you wished had died. They were all pretty much only really minor characters, but a story where only the bad guys die and all the good guys live isn't really a great story.

    Some things were predictable, like all the relationships (especially the four main protagonists), the horse situation and the last page or so. Totally saw that coming, except Lassiter's mood swing. What? Considering what he was doing during that chapter up to that point, that seems like an unlikely - and radical - change of character, especially in light of their imminent situation. Actually that whole last chapter could be skipped. The action is decent, but there's a character who shows up for no good reason. Grey really forced that person's appearance. And the book ends so abruptly it's uncomfortable.

    You know what else he forced? *SPOILER ALERT* Lassiter liked to roll stones when he was younger. Who cares? That's a weird detail to share with someone you met once a couple of months ago. And the story would work fine without it.

    But really, it's a pretty good story. I felt like it was a western romance instead of the western adventure I expected, but still good.

    Also, the edition I have didn't have a map, which would have been nice to have when following Venters' story. So if you can, get a copy with a map.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 17, 2015

    Excellent read

    This was the first Zane Grey book I've read (my father used to read them)
    but this one caught my eye and once started, I couldn't stop.
    Excellent writer.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2015

    Sage

    M'kay.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2015

    Violet

    "Told her."

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2015

    good western

    enjoyed this book. Kept me interested all the way through and on edge waiting to see what would happen next.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2014

    Very good

    Gopherpelt.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2014

    WarriorSchool Chapter 4: First Day

    Comments: After reading your reveiws I was very unimpressed with the number of oc requests I got. I will use the ones you gave me though. <p>
    Story: <p>
    I was lost. Amberpaw and Featherpaw had it easy. They both had gym which is right next to our dorm. In this school there are only two classes. Gym and academics. I have academics. This includes english, math, science, and history. The classes for apprentices (paws) are on Thunder level. New warriors are anywhere else. As I was searching through this maze, I happened to come across a couple kissing. I wanted to look away but then again, my dream is to have someone who loves me that much so I might stant to take a few notes. Not literaly. The girl was tall and slender with beautiful blonde hair but she dyed most of it blue. She wore a hoodie and blue jeand and had really rockin black knee high boots. She was gorgeous. The boy was tall and slender to bur look at those muscles. I mean he looked really strong! He had black hair that would fall in his face. I was pretty good looking to. When they broke apart, the girl said "bye Gopher." The boy called Gopher smiled sheepishly and said "see ya Weather". I couldn't concentrate on what I was doing. Suddenly I slammed into something. It was Weather. She backed up. "Omg" she said. "I am such a klutz. I am, like, so sorry." I calmly pick up my books. Given that she is not carrying books of her own makes me assume she is on her way to gym. "Im the one who is sorry" I started. "I wasn't paying attention. By the way, I'm kinda lost. Do you think you could help me find Truststar's academic class?" Weather looks at me. "Of course" she says. "My name is Weatherspirit. What's yours?" I smile. Weatherspirit. Thats a cool name. "Sagepaw" I answer. She gives me directions to class and I soon arrive. When I enter, I find class is very small. Only three other apprentices! Their names are Applepaw (medium build girl, long red hair in a braid to the side. Wears a lot of black. Comes from ShadowGroup), Granitepaw (small boy with pale blonde hair and is slightly chubby. From RiverGroup.) and lastly Cloverpaw (Tallish boy with a stocky build. Black hair that falls in his face.) I stop in my tracks as I see Cloverpaw. He. Is. Gorgeous. I know he is from WindGroup but I cannot fight these feelings for him. I luv him. <p>
    Comments: now the plot is building. Cant wait for next chapter! Next chapter next res!

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2014

    Yay!

    You made me happy! Cloverpaw for the win!

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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