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Riders on the Storm: The Doors Concerto
     

Riders on the Storm: The Doors Concerto

by Jaz Coleman
 
Unlike previous discs in this series, which have focused on the music of Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin, the content of The Doors Concerto was shaped by the band's surviving members. As a result, the tunes tackled here share more common ground with the originals, particularly on more atmospheric pieces such as "The End," which extends even further here than it did

Overview

Unlike previous discs in this series, which have focused on the music of Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin, the content of The Doors Concerto was shaped by the band's surviving members. As a result, the tunes tackled here share more common ground with the originals, particularly on more atmospheric pieces such as "The End," which extends even further here than it did originally. The basic pattern is pretty simple: Have the musicians of the Prague Symphony Orchestra replicate the seething rhythm pulse that simmered beneath most of the Doors' best-known material, and overlay that with the over-the-top stylings of flamboyant violinist Kennedy, whose instrument takes the place of Jim Morrison's vocals. The conceit, while an odd one, works fairly well on songs with more unconventional arrangements and more contrast between the melodic elements, such as "The Unknown Soldier" and "Spanish Caravan." More aggressive tunes, like "Strange Days" and "Light My Fire," don't fare as well, with the musicians getting tangled in the dense sonic thickets. But mastermind Jaz Coleman (the guiding light of post-punk icons Killing Joke) wisely accentuates the classic, rather than the rock. Aficionados will have a field day with The Doors Concerto, both debating its merits and doing double-takes at the soaring sounds within.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Brendan Swift
There's always an air of pretentiousness that accompanies classical performances of pop and rock classics, and most performances are quickly dismissed to the muzak-filled realms of elevators and doctor's waiting rooms. The fact that classical violinist Nigel Kennedy has dropped his first name for this set (to become Kennedy) doesn't bode well. Which makes it all the more surprising that this collection is quite good. Teaming up with producer Jaz Coleman (who has previously reworked Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin in the same vein) and the Prague Symphony Orchestra, Kennedy's violin replaces the vocals of Jim Morrison. Fortunately, lurking underneath Kennedy's guise as a rebel lies the thing which first brought him so much attention: his ability to play exquisite music, both technically and emotionally. Coleman's arrangements bring new depth to the music; at times the results bear little in common with the originals (such as "Riders on the Storm" and "People Are Strange"); nonetheless, they're fascinating musical excursions best approached with an open mind. Some tracks, such as the simple pop classic "Light My Fire," would have been better left alone and cry out for Morrison's passionate vocals rather than the melancholic strains of the violin; nonetheless, this collection makes for a good listen in an oftentimes difficult genre.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/10/2000
Label:
Decca
UPC:
0028946735022
catalogNumber:
467350

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