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Riding the Rails: Teenagers on the Move During the Great Depression [NOOK Book]

Overview

"There is no feeling in the world like sitting in a side-door Pullman and watching the world go by, listening to the clickety-clack of the wheels, hearing that old steam whistle blowing for crossings and towns." -George Phillips in Riding the Rails

At the height of the Great Depression, 250,000 teenage hoboes were riding the rails and roaming America. Some left home out of desperation and went looking for work and a better life, sometimes ...
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Riding the Rails: Teenagers on the Move During the Great Depression

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Overview

"There is no feeling in the world like sitting in a side-door Pullman and watching the world go by, listening to the clickety-clack of the wheels, hearing that old steam whistle blowing for crossings and towns." -George Phillips in Riding the Rails

At the height of the Great Depression, 250,000 teenage hoboes were riding the rails and roaming America. Some left home out of desperation and went looking for work and a better life, sometimes traveling hundreds of miles on the rumor of a job waiting farther down the line. Others left out of boredom; still others with a wanderlust and romantic idea of life on the road.

The restless youth of these boxcar boys and girls, many who went from "middle-class gentility to scrabble-ass poor" overnight, is recaptured in Riding the Rails. Based on the award-winning documentary, this book dispels the myths of a hobo existence and reveals the hard stories of a daring generation of American teenagers-forgotten heroes-who survived some of the hardest times in our nations' history. Whether you're a "gaycat" (novice rider) or a "dingbat" (seasoned hobo), Riding the Rails is entertaining and inspiring, recapturing a time when the country was "dying by inches."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781135942281
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 6/1/2004
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 872,889
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Errol Lincoln Uys is a renowned writer and editor. He was the editor-in-chief of Reader's Digest in South Africa and collaborated with James A. Michener on his South African novel The Covenant. Uys is also the author of the well-received novel, Brazil. He lives in Cambridge, Massachussetts.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 20, 2013

    great history book

    This book is mostly a history book. There are a lot of facts about the history of teenagers during the great depression and a lot of primary source stories from people that lived during this time. Overall it is a very good book and was very eye opening to the tough times during the depression. The book wasn't much of a story but more of a bunch of shorter stories to give the reader different points of view of these teenagers that rode from town to town on trains to try to find jobs. The book points out how the teenagers were actually often times inspiring because they would travel thousands of miles just on the a story of jobs being available and if when they got there the jobs didn't exist they would travel another couple thousand miles because of a different story. This book has countless stories and facts that would just surprise anyone. The book not only has stories of these kids and why they either left home or were forced to leave home, it also shares the view of many adults during this time. The book shows how just mere children impacted not just families but the entirety of the United States. Lastly the book takes views that most people wouldn't even think about. One chapter is entirely dedicated to the life of a black teen, and how much harder life was traveling colored. Though this book can get dry with facts and similar stories I would recommend this book to anyone interested in having their eyes opened.

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