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Right Here, Right Now
     

Right Here, Right Now

by David Benoit
 
A true elder statesman of contemporary jazz (whose seminal mid-'80s recordings helped pave the way for the smooth jazz genre), pianist David Benoit stayed relevant, fresh, and funky due to three factors -- brilliant melodies, stylistic diversity from track to track, and working with hip, edgy producers. Rick Braun co-produced two of Benoit's recent, similarly

Overview

A true elder statesman of contemporary jazz (whose seminal mid-'80s recordings helped pave the way for the smooth jazz genre), pianist David Benoit stayed relevant, fresh, and funky due to three factors -- brilliant melodies, stylistic diversity from track to track, and working with hip, edgy producers. Rick Braun co-produced two of Benoit's recent, similarly brilliant offerings, Professional Dreamer (1999) and Fuzzy Logic (2001), and on Right Here, Right Now assumes the helm fully, guiding Benoit through a wide terrain of musical territory, sometimes adding his own trumpet expertise. There's the ongoing fun of funk/soul triumphs like "Watermelon Man" (Herbie Hancock's classic fashioned with the old-school bounce of another Benoit influence, Ramsey Lewis), the retro-minded title track, and the brassy jam "Jellybeans and Chocolate" (featuring Brian Culbertson and Euge Groove). Benoit's more thoughtful side emerges on the film score-like "Le Grand," an unofficial tribute to the style of Michel Legrand featuring a dense percussion atmosphere, and the understated, melancholy "Quiet Room," a tribute to Benoit's late father (featuring Braun and guitarist Pat Kelley) and something of a sequel to his Grammy-nominated piece "Dad's Room." Benoit's other stops include hitching posts in "Swingin' Waikiki" (ah, the joy of bossa, featuring saxman Andy Suzuki) and a mystical, bass-throbbing "Third Encounter." Aside from his occasional Vince Guaraldi reduxes, Benoit with a few exceptions never much relied on cover tunes, but here includes two besides the Hancock tune -- a dreamy "Don't Let Me Be Lonely Tonight" with Peter White and an orchestra, and a sparse easy listening cover of "Don't Know Why." Years passed, smooth jazz radio kept playing his oldies, yet his new stuff kept getting better and better.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/14/2003
Label:
Verve
UPC:
0602498603024
catalogNumber:
000059702

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

David Benoit   Primary Artist,Piano,Hammond Organ,fender rhodes,Wurlitzer,String Pads
Pat Kelley   Guitar
Peter White   Guitar,Soloist
Sid Page   Concert Master
Brad Dutz   Percussion
Kevin Axt   Bass
Rick Braun   Trumpet,Conductor,Flugelhorn
Denyse Buffum   Viola
Luis Conte   Percussion
Larry Corbett   Cello
Paulinho Da Costa   Percussion
Brian Culbertson   Trombone
Nathan East   Bass
Steve Ferrone   Drums
Kirstin Fife   Violin
Dominic Genova   Bass
Bud Harner   Drums
Nick Lane   Trombone
Tony Maiden   Guitar
Carole Mukogawa   Viola
Land Richards   Drums
Anatoly Rosinsky   Violin
Jimbo Ross   Viola
Steve Sykes   Human Whistle
Dean Taba   Bass
Evan Wilson   Viola
John Wittenberg   Violin
Margaret Wooten   Violin
Susan Chatman   Violin
Randy Jacobs   Guitar
Andy Suzuki   Tenor Saxophone
Jeff Olson   Drums
Freddie "Ready Freddie" Washington   Bass
Wayne Bergeron   Trumpet
Rudy Stein   Cello
Laurence Greenfield   Violin
Eve Butler   Violin
Cameron Patrick   Violin
Euge Groove   Tenor Saxophone
Dan Smith   Cello
Sarah Parkins   Violin

Technical Credits

James Taylor   Composer
Herbie Hancock   Composer
David Benoit   Arranger,Composer
Rick Braun   Arranger,Composer,Producer,Horn Arrangements,String Arrangements
Mitchel Forman   Composer
Nick Lane   Horn Arrangements
Jesse Harris   Composer
Hollis King   Art Direction

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