Right Ho, Jeeves

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Overview

Jeeves has some outrageous ideas about how Gussie Fink-Nottle can capture the affections of Miss Madeline Bassett: scarlet tights and a false beard. What follows is a delightful romp through the banquet halls and boudoirs of English high society by "the funniest writer ever to put words on paper" (Hugh Laurie).

"P. G. Wodehouse at his shining best." --John Mortimer

P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) grew up in ...

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Right Ho, Jeeves

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Overview

Jeeves has some outrageous ideas about how Gussie Fink-Nottle can capture the affections of Miss Madeline Bassett: scarlet tights and a false beard. What follows is a delightful romp through the banquet halls and boudoirs of English high society by "the funniest writer ever to put words on paper" (Hugh Laurie).

"P. G. Wodehouse at his shining best." --John Mortimer

P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) grew up in England and came to the United States just before World War I. During his lifetime he wrote more than ninety books which were translated into several languages and won international acclaim.

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Editorial Reviews

Time Magazine
I don’t know if I’ve ever derived such an immediate sense of calm and well-being from any book as I did from Right Ho, Jeeves. It was like I was Pac-Man and the book was a power-up.— Lev Grossman
The New Yorker
“Wodehouse is the funniest writer—that is, the most resourceful and unflagging deliverer of fun—that the human race, a glum crowd, has yet produced.”
The Times [London]
“A brilliantly funny writer—perhaps the most consistently funny the English language has yet produced.”
Lynne Truss
“You should read Wodehouse when you’re well, and when you’re poorly; when you’re travelling, and when you’re not; when you’re feeling clever, and when you’re feeling utterly dim. Wodehouse always lifts your spirits, no matter how high they happen to be already.”
Stephen Fry
“The masterly episode where Gussie Fink-Nottle presents the prizes at Market Snodsbury grammar school is frequently included in collections of great comic literature and has often been described as the single funniest piece of sustained writing in the language. I would urge you, however, to head straight for a library or bookshop and get hold of the complete novel Right Ho, Jeeves, where you will encounter it fully in context and find that it leaps even more magnificently to life.”
Evelyn Waugh
“Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He will continue to release future generations from captivity that may be more irksome than our own. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.”
Kingsley Amis
“The works of Wodehouse continue on their unique way, unmarked by the passage of time.”
Lev Grossman - Time Magazine
“I don’t know if I’ve ever derived such an immediate sense of calm and well-being from any book as I did from Right Ho, Jeeves. It was like I was Pac-Man and the book was a power-up.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140284096
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/28/2000
  • Series: Jeeves and Wooster Series
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 4.46 (w) x 7.14 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

P. G. Wodehouse was born in England in 1881 and in 1955 became an American citizen. He published more than ninety books and had a successful career writing lyrics and musicals in collaboration with Jerome Kern, Guy Bolton, and Cole Porter, among others.

Biography

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse was born in 1881 in Guildford, the son of a civil servant, and educated at Dulwich College. He spent a brief period working for the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank before abandoning finance for writing, earning a living by journalism and selling stories to magazines.

An enormously popular and prolific writer, he produced about 100 books. In Jeeves, the ever resourceful "gentleman's personal gentleman", and the good-hearted young blunderer Bertie Wooster, he created two of the best known and best loved characters in twentieth century literature. Their exploits, first collected in Carry On, Jeeves, were chronicled in fourteen books, and have been repeatedly adapted for television, radio and the stage. Wodehouse also created many other comic figures, notably Lord Emsworth, the Hon. Galahad Threepwood, Psmith and the numerous members of the Drones Club. He was part-author and writer of fifteen straight plays and 250 lyrics for some 30 musical comedies. The Times hailed him as a "comic genius recognized in his lifetime as a classic and an old master of farce."

P. G. Wodehouse said, "I believe there are two ways of writing novels. One is mine, making a sort of musical comedy without music and ignoring real life altogether; the other is going right deep down into life and not caring a damn ...."

Wodehouse married in 1914 and took American citizenship in 1955. He was created a Knight of the British Empire in the 1975 New Year's Honours List. In a BBC interview he said that he had no ambitions left now that he had been knighted and there was a waxwork of him in Madame Tussaud's. He died on St. Valentine's Day, 1975, at the age of ninety-three.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Books LTD.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (full name); P. Brooke-Haven, Pelham Grenville, J. Plum, C. P. West, J. Walker Williams, and Basil Windham
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 15, 1881
    2. Place of Birth:
      Guildford, Surrey, England
    1. Date of Death:
      February 14, 1975
    2. Place of Death:
      Southampton, New York

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 17 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2008

    I Need A Jeeves

    Right Ho, Jeeves is so laugh out loud funny, one can only shake the old pumpkin in delight. Is there a better scene anywhere than Gussie Fink-Nottle, drunk to the gills, handing out prizes at a boys' school? And really, could there be a more fantastically proper hero than Jeeves? A man who can save two romances and pull Bertie's dinner jacketed self out of the fire? No, Jeeves is perfect, as is this stellar work by Wodehouse. The more Wodehouse I enjoy, the more I am convinced that no one used language as playfully and brilliantly as Wodehouse.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2013

    Funny!!!

    Loved it!!! Highly recommended!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2001

    The Old Feudal Spirit

    'You silly a . . . ' is a phrase often repeated by Bertram (Bertie) Wooster's favorite Aunt Dahlia in describing him in this country romp of romance and gastronomy gone wrong. And that's the nicest thing she has to say about him in this story. Bertie's main redeeming quality to his friends and family in this story is his manservant, Jeeves. Over the years of their relationship, everyone who knows Bertie comes to realize that Bertie is a bumbling fool and that Jeeves is a problem-solving genius. The parallels to Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are unavoidable in one's mind, except these stories are played out as comedy along the lines of A Midsummer Night's Dream rather than as serious business. Like Dr. Watson for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Bertie is the narrator of this novel. Bertie, as a gentleman, feels that it is important to keep Jeeves in his place. He looks for the old feudal spirit of serf to master from Jeeves. When Jeeves challenges Bertie's decision to wear an informal jacket in the country that he brought back from Cannes, Bertie decides to put Jeeves in his place. In Right Ho, Jeeves, everyone is looking for solutions to their problems from Jeeves. The fly in the old ointment though is that Bertie tells Jeeves to stifle himself while Bertie tries to save the day. As you can imagine, each Bertie wheeze (or plot) turns out to be a blunder instead that makes things much worse. Then Bertie tries again, with even worse results. And so on. As background to the story's beginning, Bertie is just back from two months in Cannes on the Riviera with Aunt Dahlia, his cousin Angela, and her friend, Madeline Bassett. Aunt Dahlia recruits Bertie to give the prizes at the local school, while Bertie scrambles to avoid the appearance. His old pal, Gussie Fink-Nottle, a newt expert, has fallen for Madeline Bassett but he is too shy to propose. Bertie works on Gussie's resolve. Tuppy Glossop, another pal, is engaged to cousin Angela until they have a row about double chins and sharks. Bertie tries to bring reconciliation to the warring parties. Aunt Dahlia's domestic peace depends on the gourmet cooking of Anatole, which is essential to get money for her magazine out of her dyspepsic husband, Uncle Tom, to offset what she lost at the casino. Bertie's misconceptions soon have Anatole in despair, and contemplating departure. Aunt Dahlia is shaken to the core. Things look glum indeed for the young lovers, Aunt Dahlia, and for Bertie. How will the day be saved? The book is wonderfully read by Alexander Spencer, my favorite narrator of these P.G. Wodehouse stories and novels. Wodehouse intended these to be read as musical comedy, rather than considered as being drawn from life. With the proper narration, with an appropriate English accent, the tales are much enhanced. Why, then did I rate the book down one star? First, the plot does go on and on through its complications. A good editor could have chopped this down by about 25 percent and made a much better novel. Second, there is a reference to people of color beginning with the letter 'n' that will offend many, and certainly offended me. A better offering in this series are the stories in the audio cassettes entitled, Jeeves and the Old School Chum. You might start there if you don't know Bertie and Jeeves yet. Only after you have used up the five star Jeeves audio tapes should you listen to this one. And you should do so only if you are fully compelled to have more of Bertie and Jeeves. After you have finished this book, consider whether you have ever failed to take good advice. If you have avoided that, was false pride involved? If so, how can you overcome that misconception and self-deception in the future? What? Donald Mitchell, co-author of The Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2000

    Fourth time read in 20 years

    This Overlook Press book is tasteful, having a light blue cloth cover with title and author in gold lettering on the spine only. It's small and light with a nice look and feel that invites browsing. That's the way I discovered Wodehouse, one of the pleasant surprises of my life. Be sure to read 'Right Ho, Jeeves' before 'Code of the Woosters.' It's not as funny but gets you accustomed to the Wodehouse rhythms, has classic scenes of its own, and plot and character-wise leads into the better book. Overlook Press just published both, my two favorites, as the beginning of a set. Bringing these particular two out first shows the publisher understands Wodehouse. There is an effortless quality in the sentences and plot twisting, chuckles come regularly, and the 'Englishness' of Bertie and Jeeves is `just right.¿ Even Wodehouse, the master, didn¿t always achieve these results. There is one unnecessary, straining-to-be-funny reference to black people in each book. In 'Code of the Woosters', Bertie describes in his involved way someone seen in shadows as reminding him of a 'negress.' In 'Right Ho, Jeeves' there is a disparaging play on the name `Uncle Tom,¿ Aunt Dahlia's husband. Colloquialisms, slang, and `cool¿ expressions of the day are dated but this does not detract much, surprisingly. In any case, they are numerous, varied, inventive and, I am convinced, many are coined. Only Bertie said them, even back then, so in that sense they're not dated. The 'main course' in Wodehouse, the measured, balanced, sophisticated, intricate and amazingly humorous sentences, are served in generous portions. One might be a paragraph long and meander through the whole history of a topic until finally coming to its point in, say, the last six or seven words. That point is like a punch line and you never know what it will be or where Bertie is going with his well-constructed rambling. Jeeves is the other great presence in ¿Code of the Woosters¿ and ¿Right Ho, Jeeves.¿ His dialogue is spare, his appearances few and brief (he is always 'shimmering out' after a few lines), but his presence is always felt. It wasn¿t until this fourth reading that I realized how rarely he is physically present in scenes. Often he is there only as part of Bertie¿s thought processes. Such restraint on the author¿s part, using the critical element of his successful formula so sparingly. Or might the reason the duo of Bertram and Jeeves works so well be that '90 percent Bertram, 10 percent Jeeves' lack of equilibrium?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 30, 2010

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