Right Living: An Anglo-American Tradition of Self-Help Medicine and Hygiene

Right Living: An Anglo-American Tradition of Self-Help Medicine and Hygiene

by Charles E. Rosenberg
     
 

During the eighteenth and much of the nineteenth century, most Americans healed themselves at home, as their ancestors had done for centuries. They relied upon books and pamphlets addressing health and diseases, diet, exercise, sex, mental health—everything one needed to know about how to avoid illness and what to do if illness or injury should strike.

In

Overview

During the eighteenth and much of the nineteenth century, most Americans healed themselves at home, as their ancestors had done for centuries. They relied upon books and pamphlets addressing health and diseases, diet, exercise, sex, mental health—everything one needed to know about how to avoid illness and what to do if illness or injury should strike.

In Right Living: An Anglo-American Tradition of Self-Help Medicine and Hygiene, Charles E. Rosenberg and his co-authors analyze these early health-oriented books, pamphlets, and broadsides—their origins, content, role, and authorship—and contribute to our understanding of their role in everyday life. Right Living also offers insight into the world views and bedside practices of another time by examining the shaping and transmission of the English and continental tradition, the persistent interest in sexual relations and their consequences, and the changing uses of print as a commodity and as a product of specific, time-bound technologies.

Contributors: Kathleen Brown, Mary E. Fissell, William H. Helfand, Thomas A. Horrocks, Ronald L. Numbers, Charles E. Rosenberg, Steven Shapin, Jean Silver-Isenstadt, Steven Stowe.

Editorial Reviews

Choice
Bibliophiles, medical historians, and collectors of Americana will find this extremely well documented book a treasure trove of information.

JAMA
This intriguing collection,... which features some beautifully reproduced illustrated posters from the mid-nineteenth century, is a welcome contribution to the histories of print culture, the mass market, and medicine. By demonstrating how these three histories have been intertwined, it is also a pioneering one.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801871894
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date:
06/15/2003
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.92(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

Christopher Lawrence
This book is a serious and original contribution to the history of popular medicine and its print culture.

from the Preface
Popular health texts illuminate the practice of medicine itself and the experiences of sickness, birth, and death... Such texts provide useful insight into worldview as well as bedside practice. Popular guides to health were—and still are—relevant to historians seeking to understand the changing uses of medicine as cultural ideology.

Meet the Author

Charles E. Rosenberg is the Ernest E. Monrad Professor in the Social Sciences in the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University. He is the author of No Other Gods: On Science and American Social Thought and The Care of Strangers: The Rise of America's Hospital System, both available from Johns Hopkins.

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