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Right to Know: Your Guide to Using and Defending Freedom of Information Law in the United States

Overview

The Right to Know: Your Guide to Using and Defending Freedom of Information Law in the United States sets out in plain language freedom-of-information best practices for ordinary citizens, activist organizations, journalists, bloggers, and lawyers.

Jacqueline Klosek, an expert in U.S. information law, educes practical lessons from dozens of case studies to show how readers can use freedom of information laws to protect themselves, but also to protect the environment, and public ...

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Overview

The Right to Know: Your Guide to Using and Defending Freedom of Information Law in the United States sets out in plain language freedom-of-information best practices for ordinary citizens, activist organizations, journalists, bloggers, and lawyers.

Jacqueline Klosek, an expert in U.S. information law, educes practical lessons from dozens of case studies to show how readers can use freedom of information laws to protect themselves, but also to protect the environment, and public health and safety, as well as to expose governmental and corporate crime, waste, and corruption. Finally, the book shows American readers how, in contrast to what is going on in most democracies, their right to know is being progressively curtailed, why this is so dangerous to democracy, and what they can do to help reverse the alarming trend.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

". . . this book will be of greatest use to those engaged in these battles to pry open the doors of government agencies. There are, [Klosek] notes, many exemptions to the law that prevent access, but she does provide practical methods for citizens to use the act to protect themselves and their communities. The most dangerous aspect of what is occurring is the increasing effort to deny Americans access to government generated information with which to make an informed analysis of what is really occurring."

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Bookviews by Alan Caruba

"Jacqueline Klosek provides readers with a detailed analysis of the critical importance of the Freedom Of Information Act (FOIA)."

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Apex Reviews

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780313359279
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/30/2009
  • Pages: 227
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    What You Don't Know Can Destroy Your Country...

    Anyone familiar with the eight previous years of the Bush Administration no doubt remembers the extremes to which administration officials often went to keep many of their activities hidden from public view. As alarming as such surreptitious behavior may appear to the average law-abiding citizen, the truth is that it's more common than you may think. In fact, the federal government has been keeping secrets from the public for decades - of which even such an egregious criminal act as Watergate is only the tip of the iceberg. In light of such deception, the right to know exactly what our government is doing is more important now than ever before.

    Never fear: throughout the pages of The Right To Know, author and attorney Jacqueline Klosek provides readers with a detailed analysis of the critical importance of the Freedom Of Information Act (FOIA). Originally passed in 1967, FOIA ensures the right of every American citizen to know explicit details regarding the federal government's ongoing activities, preventing it from acting in secrecy that could prove harmful to the American public. Furthermore, FOIA greatly reduces the potential for corporations to get away with fraud, waste, or corruption, ultimately ensuring public safety and the protection of the environment. For such a seemingly simple law, FOIA does more to protect our rights, civil liberties, and overall democracy than most of us ever realize - and it is a privilege that should be defended at all costs.

    It's an established fact that each republic can only remain as strong and empowered as its citizenry allows it to be, and by embracing the strength that FOIA provides, we can all ensure that the republic of the United States Of America maintains the standard of strength for which it has long been respected around the world.


    Kendra Carroll
    Apex Reviews

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