Rights of Man

Rights of Man

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by Thomas Paine, Paine, Dover Thrift Editions
     
 

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Rights of Man presents an impassioned defense of the Enlightenment principles of freedom and equality that Thomas Paine believed would soon sweep the world. He boldly claimed, "From a small spark, kindled in America, a flame has arisen, not to be extinguished. Without consuming ... it winds its progress from nation to nation." Though many more

Overview

Rights of Man presents an impassioned defense of the Enlightenment principles of freedom and equality that Thomas Paine believed would soon sweep the world. He boldly claimed, "From a small spark, kindled in America, a flame has arisen, not to be extinguished. Without consuming ... it winds its progress from nation to nation." Though many more sophisticated thinkers argued for the same principles and many people died in the attempt to realize them, no one was better able than Paine to articulate them in a way which fired the hopes and dreams of the common man and actually stirred him to revolutionary political action.

About the Author:
A participant in both the American and French Revolutions and in the governments that first arose from them, Thomas Paine is best remembered as the highly popular pamphleteer whose incendiary Common Sense was largely responsible for motivating the American colonists to declare independence. He was born in England on January 29, 1737, and his impoverished early life offered scant evidence of the qualities that would later elevate him to literary and historical prominence. Taking the first available opportunity to improve his lot, he moved to America in 1775, coincidentally arriving at the time when revolutionary fervor was just taking hold.

Editorial Reviews

Juan Luis Sanchez University of California
"Perhaps no political treatise is more important to the development of modern political thought and yet so often misread than Thomas Paine's Rights of Man. Claire Grogan's comprehensively annotated edition of this classic text corrects the problem of decontextualized readings by not only reviving the tumultuous political debates with which Paine engaged, but also by distinguishing the unique style, argument, and overall significance of this revolutionary tract. With a critical yet lively introduction, this edition of Rights of Man is indispensable to anyone interested in understanding the development of 1790s radical thought and its relevance today."
From the Publisher
“Perhaps no political treatise is more important to the development of modern political thought and yet so often misread than Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man. Claire Grogan’s comprehensively annotated edition of this classic text corrects the problem of decontextualized readings by not only reviving the tumultuous political debates with which Paine engaged, but also by distinguishing the unique style, argument, and overall significance of this revolutionary tract. With a critical yet lively introduction, this edition of Rights of Man is indispensable to anyone interested in understanding the development of 1790s radical thought and its relevance today.” — Juan Luís Sánchez, University of California, Los Angeles

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486408934
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
05/14/1999
Series:
Dover Thrift Editions Series
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
252,963
Product dimensions:
5.21(w) x 8.23(h) x 0.51(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Meet the Author

Thomas Paine was born in Thetford, England, in 1737, the son of a staymaker. He had little schooling and worked at a number of jobs, including tax collector, a position he lost for agitating for an increase in excisemen’s pay. Persuaded by Benjamin Franklin, he emigrated to America in 1774. In 1776 he began his American Crisis series of thirteen pamphlets, and also published the incalculably influential Common Sense, which established Paine not only as a truly revolutionary thinker, but as the American Revolution’s fiercest political theorist. In 1787 Paine returned to Europe, where he became involved in revolutionary politics. In England his books were burned by the public hangman. Escaping to France, Paine took part in drafting the French constitution and voted against the king’s execution. He was imprisoned for a year and narrowly missed execution himself. In 1802 he returned to America and lived in New York State, poor, ill and largely despised for his extremism and so-called atheism (he was in fact a deist). Thomas Paine died in 1809. His body was exhumed by William Cobbett, and the remains were taken to England for a memorial burial. Unfortunately, the remains were subsequently lost.

Eric Foner is the DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University. A winner of the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates, Foner is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the British Academy. He has served terms as President of both the American Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians.

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The Rights of Man 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
CharlesSage More than 1 year ago
While Paine's goal was to defend the French Revolution as it took place, he also provides, perhaps unwittingly, a treatise on natural rights that governments should and must respect if they are to have any legitimacy. He also covers what it means to be a government and where the true power lies. A great plain-language text that is still relevant today, Rights of Man is a must read for anyone interested in some of the theory behind the Constitutional debates in our own country 200+ years ago.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One might assume that a book on political philosophy promises to be a rather dry read, but, aside from a foray into English tax reform in Part Two, this is largely not the case for Rights of Man. Paine's work remains immenitely readable. It was fascinating to read the case for so many of the central principles of American democracy. Many of these principles, including democracy, political equality, liberty, and the separation of church and state we accept as given, and hardly take the time to examine theri foundation. Paine is writing in a time when these ideas were actively being debated.
donrawfulguy More than 1 year ago
HAVING DIFFICULTY STAYING WITH THIS BOOK
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In short, freedom isn't free.
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