Ringworld (Known Space Series)

Ringworld (Known Space Series)

4.0 41
by Larry Niven
     
 

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A new place is being built, a world of huge dimensions, encompassing millions of miles, stronger than any planet before it. There is gravity, and with high walls and its proximity to the sun, a livable new planet that is three million times the area of the Earth can be formed. We can start again!  See more details below

Overview

A new place is being built, a world of huge dimensions, encompassing millions of miles, stronger than any planet before it. There is gravity, and with high walls and its proximity to the sun, a livable new planet that is three million times the area of the Earth can be formed. We can start again!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345333926
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/28/1985
Series:
Known Space Series
Edition description:
REISSUE
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
100,495
Product dimensions:
4.18(w) x 6.88(h) x 0.92(d)
Lexile:
680L (what's this?)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

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Ringworld (Known Space Series) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has been greatly misplaced. It needs to be included in the classics section of every bookstore. It tells the story of the human species impeeding doom due to our over population. It also explores theories behind human thought. Is Teela Brown incredibly lucky, or is it Louis's delusionary vision of her? The rumor of her luck has spread and turned into reality by people's altered perceptions. This alienates her from society, placing her as some sort of a god. Although not as tradgic as the other titles I listed, Ringworld is an exploration into human thought as well as exploration into the great unknown.
PatrickKanouse More than 1 year ago
I decided to re-read Ringworld over vacation, for it had been years since I read it. The novel has always reminded me of Rendezvous with Rama: the exploration of a vast alien artifact. Obviously, with many differences, but nonetheless, a "similar" feel. In both cases, the mystery of the novel is the mystery of the artifact: how it was created and why was it created and what the heck happened? Louis Wu, a 200-year old human, is approached by Nessus, a Puppeteer. Nessus asks Wu to join a crew that will explore an ancient artifact. Along with Nessus and Wu, Teela Brown--a young woman who for a time is Wu's lover, and Speaker-to-Animals, a Kzin, join the expedition. The novel itself is basically the exploration's vessel crashlands, they seek to find an escape, and learn a bit about the ringworld and other things. Much of the novel deals with interspecies differences and how they approach those differences along with the effect of Teela's and Louis's age difference. This greatly simplifies the plot, but that is the essence of it. What matters in this novel is the exploration and character interactions, which is what has made it a classic. The world is richly developed, retaining its mystery despite several hundred pages. Wu, Teela, Speaker-to-Animals, and Nessus are given lots of room be themselves and interact. I found Nessus the most interesting, for he has as much mystery--as do the Puppeteers in general--as the ringworld. I found Teela to be the most uninteresting primarily because she is too one-dimensional, I think--as if Niven was over emphasizing her youthfulness and boxed her into that pattern. Still, this is a novel well worth reading. It is deserving of its classic status.
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Marty0 More than 1 year ago
I Absolutely love this book.
Joel_M More than 1 year ago
This book was more an exercise in world building than anything else. For the most part it feels like the point of the book is "let's explore this awesome Dyson sphere variation while examining inter-species relationships." There is definitely character development that takes place as well, but to me it comes off as primarily an exploration and survival book. The world explored is incredibly interesting, but I found the main character a bit distasteful. He is a bored-with-life 200 year old man who is pragmatic, self-centered, sex-obsessed, and unlike the other characters seems very little changed/improved by the whole experience. The storytelling was a bit jerky, and I though the foreshadowing regarding a big plot point toward the end was incredibly obvious. Overall: I'm glad I read this for the excellent world-building but probably won't bother to ever read it again.
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I read this book over a vacation and enjoyed every page. It was difficult to figure out what was going to happen and the themes were invigorating and suspenseful.
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