Riot City Blues [Explicit Lyrics]

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Primal Scream major-domo Bobby Gillespie has steered his ship through all manner of choppy musical waters over the years, from MC5-inspired bashing to woozy electronica to brittle industrial techno. But no matter what the context, one thing remains constant in Gillespie's sonic vision: His music is meant to convey and enhance a mood of substance-fueled revelry and/or dissipation. That's certainly the case on Riot City Blues, a raw-boned set that recalls the Rolling Stones circa Sticky Fingers, both in its sound -- which leans heavily on country-blues influences -- and its vibe, a celebration of debauchery the likes of which don't come along often these days. The ...
See more details below
This CD is Not Available through BN.com

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Primal Scream major-domo Bobby Gillespie has steered his ship through all manner of choppy musical waters over the years, from MC5-inspired bashing to woozy electronica to brittle industrial techno. But no matter what the context, one thing remains constant in Gillespie's sonic vision: His music is meant to convey and enhance a mood of substance-fueled revelry and/or dissipation. That's certainly the case on Riot City Blues, a raw-boned set that recalls the Rolling Stones circa Sticky Fingers, both in its sound -- which leans heavily on country-blues influences -- and its vibe, a celebration of debauchery the likes of which don't come along often these days. The raucous "Country Girl" -- on which it's easy to imagine beer bottles breaking in the background -- sets the tone perfectly, with mandolins and twangy guitars framing Gillespie's booze-soaked drawl in smoky tones. What follows is, by and large, meat-and-potatoes rock with roots about as deep as redwoods. Sometimes, as on "Sweet Rock and Roll" and "We're Gonna Boogie," it's necessary to tune out Gillespie's simplistic lyrical stance in order to concentrate on the riffage at hand. Then again, the singer manages to tap into some primordial emotion when he's in the mood, most notably on the aching closer, "Sometimes I Feel So Lonely." It's that confluence of moods -- boozy bacchanalia and hung-over regret -- that makes Riot City Blues so easy to relate to, and get lost in.
All Music Guide - Thom Jurek
If at first you don't succeed, try again. Riot City Blues is another attempt at straight-up trad rock where the ghosts of the Faces, the Rolling Stones, and others come traipsing into Bobby Gillespie's scope and he goes for it. Some heard an overly strenuous attempt at this on 1994's Give Out But Don't Give Up, where it worked not at all due to the band's attempt at literally mimicking the sounds of the aforementioned bands without adding anything else to the mix. Riot City Blues is a much more relaxed effort, and benefits significantly from that stance. Yeah, it's true that on first listen "Country Girl," the album's opener, sounds like an in-the-studio gathering of the Stones and the Faces riotously attempting a country gospel song -- but on deeper observation, it feels more like Delaney & Bonnie & Friends on Motel Shot. The straight-up raw boogie rock of "Nitty Gritty" takes the Delaney & Bonnie move even deeper and brings elements of R&B into the equation. This is late-night drunken rockism. It's not carefully crafted; it's throwing something at the wall because it's there to throw. Riot City Blues is not an "album as event" as many past Primal Scream records were; this is an "album for its own sake" recording. It's an offering where it really seems that Gillespie doesn't care if he loses his hipster following -- all that matters is that Riot City Blues rocks. One can hear traces of not only the Faces but everything from early Alice Cooper à la Killer to Mott the Hoople, David Bowie, the Kinks, the New York Dolls, and a whole lot of other rock & roll bands. Looser than the Black Crowes, thinner than even the Black Keys; it's simply shambolic from top to bottom. This is trashy, nasty rock music that doesn't feel modern but it does feel timeless. The songs are riff-centric, some of them joyous, others darkly freaky -- "When the Bomb Drops" is a fine example, and the complete dope and guitar orgy of "Suicide Sally & Johnny Guitar" is in the red zone in the same way "Suffragette City" is. One can feel the gigantic pub-crawling smile of Mick Ronson from some strange Valhalla. Most of the tracks here were produced by ex-Killing Joke bassist/Orb collaborator Youth, with a pair recorded and produced by the rather less intense Andrew Innes. Whether "We're Gonna Boogie," with its bluesy harmonica and slide guitar -- with Bobby Gillespie sounding like Donovan singing the Stones' "Country Honk" -- is taking the piss or not is debatable, but it's a gas to listen to, as is the down-home "Hell's Comin' Down," with its fiddle courtesy of the Dirty Three and Bad Seeds' Warren Ellis, high-strung guitars, 12-strings, and mandolins. The 12-bar blues formula used on the latter cut is particularly refreshing. "Dolls" is such a raucous joy that it's infectious. It's a given that Riot City Blues, issued in 2006, is easily the most unhip record Primal Scream have ever issued. The songs are little more than dressing for the riffs, but they have lots of humor and cleverness and they lack the snide hipsterism of the times. It doesn't matter. Listened to with an open mind, it's a refreshingly retro rock & roll album that uses its waste-oid imagination in capturing every fantasy that entered Bobby Gillespie's teenage mind. Get it. [The U.S. edition of the album includes three bonus tracks including a cover of John Lennon's "Gimme Some Truth" and the "non censored" version of the "Country Girl" video.]
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/22/2006
  • Label: Sony
  • UPC: 828768851326
  • Catalog Number: 88513

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Primal Scream Primary Artist
Martin Duffy Organ, Harmonica, Piano, Harmonium, Group Member
Warren Ellis Violin
Bobby Gillespie Vocals, Group Member
Andrew Innes Banjo, Guitar, Mandolin, Moog Synthesizer, Group Member
Will Sergeant Guitar
Gary Mounfield Bass Guitar, Group Member
Julie Roberts Background Vocals
John Gibbons Background Vocals
Robert Young Guitar, Harmonica, Group Member
Alison Mosshart Vocals
Sharlene Hector Background Vocals
Darrin Mooney Percussion, Drums, Group Member
Chris Allen Hurdy-Gurdy
Sylvia Mason James Background Vocals
Technical Credits
John Lennon Composer
Primal Scream Composer, Engineer
Youth Producer, Audio Production
Tim Bran Programming
Clive Goddard Engineer
Andrew Innes Producer, Engineer, Audio Production
Stephen Marcussen Mastering
Stewart Whitmore Digital Editing
Greg Gordon Engineer
Ryan Castle Engineer
Doug Shearer Mastering
Chris Denman Producer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously