A Riot of Our Own: Night and Day with the Clash
  • A Riot of Our Own: Night and Day with the Clash
  • A Riot of Our Own: Night and Day with the Clash

A Riot of Our Own: Night and Day with the Clash

by Johnny Green, Garry Barker, Green Johnny, Ray Lowry
     
 

Johnny Green was a footloose slacker who loved punk rock, stumbled into being a roadie for the Sex Pistols, then tripped again into a job pushing sound equipment for the Clash and driving their beat-up van to performances in the mean industrial towns of England. Disaffected youth anointed the Clash as their spokesmen and made the group synonymous with punk itself

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Overview

Johnny Green was a footloose slacker who loved punk rock, stumbled into being a roadie for the Sex Pistols, then tripped again into a job pushing sound equipment for the Clash and driving their beat-up van to performances in the mean industrial towns of England. Disaffected youth anointed the Clash as their spokesmen and made the group synonymous with punk itself in the late 1970s. Eventually becoming the band's road manager, Green had a unique vantage point from which to witness the burgeoning punk rock movement while helping the band in their perpetual search for women, booze, and drugs. Green was with the Clash when they conquered America, bringing with them their bad behavior and great music, and burning out after their third, too-long tour. Written in a tell-it-as-it-was style and accompanied by contemporaneous drawings by Ray Lowry, who tagged along with the Clash on their American tour as their official "war artist," A Riot of Our Own pierces the heart of the culture and music of punk rock and the people who lived it.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Familiar to American fans for their megahit "Rock the Casbah," a music video staple during the early days of MTV, the British group The Clash have emerged in the ensuing 20 years as one of the most memorable and significant punk rock bands. Green, who was their road manager and procurer of assorted drugs and women, here recollects with considerable zest and humor just what it was like to be on tour with The Clash. Though bawdy and occasionally lurid details spice up the narrative, there is a remarkable sense of lighthearted fun throughout, splendidly enhanced by Ray Lowry's cartoonlike drawings. Green manages to make this chronicle of overindulgence, wrecked hotel rooms, and police arrests seem much less menacing than the events themselves might suggest. A rollicking insider's account that nicely complements the definitive bio, Marcus Gray's Last Gang in Town: The Story and Myth of The Clash (LJ 9/15/96). Recommended for rock music collections.--Richard Grefrath, Univ. of Nevada Lib., Reno
Kirkus Reviews
A roadie's engaging and often amusing memoir of life in the eye of the punk rock storm. Green, who served the Clash as road manager from their commercial breakthrough in England in 1977 through their emergence as an international colossus in 1980 or so, lets it all hang out, giving his fond remembrances of life on the road and in the studios. While Green was with the Clash, the band's fortunes skyrocketed (quite coincidentally, the author gently contends). All through this account, we see the four band members in their unvarnished glory-vain, dope-smoking, lazy (except when it came to writing, recording, and playing music), curious, and terribly irresponsible with money. Yet despite such facts, Green's slightly nostalgia-tinted memories will serve to further endear the Clash to their fans. As described here, we see the band as innovators and agitators and decent blokes. We also get a deft account of the creative process at work, of how the band extracted great music from ordinary experiences and sensations. Without excessively touting his influence on band members, Green (aided by British freelance writer Barker) reveals how his presence gently affected them: he introduced them to the music of country guitar legend Joe Ely (who opened for them on a leg of their 1980 US tour), for instance. Also evident is how other musicians of the punk era-Sid Vicious, John Lydon, the Dead Boys, Souixie Sue (who seldom comes off well in this type of retrospective), and others lesser known-affected the Clash and their music, for better or worse. That the Clash's music is now known mostly as soundtrack fodder or as an influence for current acts makes the timing of this book most curious indeed. Betterlate than never!

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780571199570
Publisher:
Faber and Faber
Publication date:
02/12/1999
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
628,570
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.54(d)

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