The Rise and Crisis of Psychoanalysis in America: Freud and the Americans, 1917-1985 / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $6.46
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 83%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $6.46   
  • New (6) from $25.47   
  • Used (14) from $6.46   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$25.47
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(469)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1995 Hardcover New

Ships from: san francisco, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$42.00
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(434)

Condition: New
Gift quality, Fine. A superior copy without defect. Clean, unmarked pages. Fine binding and cover. Hardcover and dust jacket. Ships daily.

Ships from: Boonsboro, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$67.48
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(147)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$77.64
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(265)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$115.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(147)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$588.89
Seller since 2013

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
Cary, North Carolina, U.S.A. 1995 Hardcover New 0195046374. FLAWLESS COPY, BRAND NEW, PRISTINE, NEVER OPENED.

Ships from: New Hampton, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview


Although Freud made only one visit to the United States, the spectacular rise and equally precipitous decline of his theories on human behavior continue to make headlines. In 1956, celebrating the centennial of Freud's birth, popular magazines reported that this "Darwin of the Mind" had fathered modern psychiatry, psychology, child raising, education, and sexual attitudes. But by 1975, Sir Peter Medawar, a medical research scientist and a Nobel Prize winner, announced in the New York Review of Books that "doctrinaire psychoanalytic theory" was the "most stupendous intellectual confidence trick of the twentieth century." In 1984, a headline in Ms. Magazine--"The Hundred Year Cover Up: How Freud Betrayed Women"--neatly summed up two decades of scathing feminist criticism. How much of this extraordinary sea change in Freud's American reputation is due to the nature of psychoanalysis itself, and how much to shifts in American society? And what, if anything, of the Freudian legacy will survive the current crisis of psychoanalysis?

The Rise and Crisis of Psychoanalysis, the long awaited conclusion to Nathan G. Hale's pathbreaking history of the American psychoanalytic movement, Freud and the Americans, offers a brilliant analysis of Freud's continuing impact on the American cultural landscape. With skill and insight, Hale traces the extraordinary popularization of Freud's ideas through magazines, books, and even novels and Hollywood movies, and reveals how the vast human laboratory of World War I seemed to confirm Freud's theories about the irrational and brutal elements of human nature. Not only did psychoanalysis prove effective for treating the frightful nightmares and other symptoms of shell-shocked soldiers, its promise of helping individuals fulfill their potential fit neatly into the uniquely American pattern of self-improvement and upward mobility. Weighing the recurrent controversies that raged over the scientific validity of Freud's theories with the arguments of influential intellectuals who saw in psychoanalysis a sweeping criticism of traditional sexual mores, Hale shows how and why psychoanalysis came to have such a pervasive influence on the fabric of American life, from child care to criminology. The twenties and thirties saw psychoanalysis transform itself from the calling of a self-chosen group of avant-garde psychiatrists and neurologists to a profession with its own institutions for training and certification. Hale documents how the American insistence on medical training, while greatly annoying to Freud himself, was essential to U.S. acceptance of the psychoanalytic profession. He recreates the enormous vogue enjoyed by psychoanalysis in the years after the Second World War, and the inevitable backlash leading up to the current crisis. As feminists rebelled against Freud's rigid gender roles, new psychotherapies and new drugs narrowed the problems for which psychoanalysis seemed appropriate, and even orthodox analysts began to question the effectiveness of the therapy when analyses lengthened from one or two to five, ten, or more years.

In its final chapters, The Rise and Crisis of Psychoanalysis offers a comprehensive and authoritative assessment of the psychoanalytic movement as it continues to respond to these challenges. Illuminating both the boldness and sweep of Freud's analytic vision and its limitations, it is destined to become a definitive work.

The Rise and Crisis of Psychoanalysis--the long-awaited conclusion to Nathan G. Hale's pathbreaking history of the American psychoanalytic movement, Freud and the Americans--offers a brilliant analysis of Freud's continuing impact on the American cultural landscape, from pop culture to the frontiers of psychological and psychiatric research.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Hale (Freud and the Americans, Volume I) begins this balanced, eloquent, highly illuminating study by explaining how American psychoanalysts gained influence treating shell-shocked WWI soldiers and veterans. He traces the liberalizing impact of psychoanalysis in the 1920s and '30s on social work, education, criminology and mental hygiene. Welcomed as an optimistic ideology of sexual and cultural reform, psychoanalysis could also be seen as sanctioning a stoic, tragic vision of unending conflict. Hale follows the popularization of psychoanalytic ideas in novels, films, the press and among artists, intellectuals and social scientists. After WWII, the practice expanded greatly, but in cloaking itself in the scientific authority of medicine, psychoanalysis hastened its own decline, Hale suggests, because the single-case method by the single observer fell out of favor. Other factors Hale identifies in the current crisis of psychoanalysis include attacks by behaviorists, feminists, gays, psychoanalysts themselves, as well as the proliferation of alternative therapies. This concluding half of a two-volume study reclaims psychoanalysis as an art and a skill to foster the cure of souls. (Jan.)
Library Journal
This completes historian Hale's indispensable study of the impact of Freud on American culture, begun with Freud and the Americans: The Origin & Foundation of the Psychoanalytic Movement in America, 1876-1918 (Oxford Univ. Pr., 1971). Besides the expected source literature, the work is based on interviews (with Walter Lippmann, Margaret Mead, and Franz Alexander, among others), 36 manuscript collections (the Menningers, Floyd Dell, A.A. Brill), and doctoral theses. Adolf Meyer, Harry Stack Sullivan, and dozens of others come to life in Hale's objective, readable narrative of the development and decline of the American psychoanalytic establishment from 1920 to 1985. Mental health professionals and social historians will revel in this work; general readers will find much of it fascinating. Highly recommended for academic and larger public libraries.-E. James Lieberman, George Washington Univ. Sch. of Medicine, Washington, D.C.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195046373
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 1/12/1995
  • Series: Freud in America , #2
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 496
  • Product dimensions: 6.38 (w) x 9.46 (h) x 1.66 (d)

Meet the Author

About the Author:

Nathan G. Hale, Jr. is the author of Freud and the Americans: The Beginning of Psychoanalysis in the United States, 1876-1917.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction 3
Pt. I Creating a Profession and a Clientele: 1920-1940 11
1 The Great War: A Human Laboratory 13
2 A New Generation of Psychoanalysts: The Institutes, 1920-1940 25
3 Women, Character, and Anxiety: Theory and Therapy, 1920-1940 38
4 Culture and Rebellion, 1912-1930 57
5 Popular and Applied Psychoanalysis: Mental Hygiene, Criminology, and the Schools, 1917-1940 74
6 Psychoanalytic Training: Young Americans Abroad 102
7 The Depression, Schisms, Refugees, 1929-1942 115
8 The Second Psychoanalytical Civil War and the California Case, 1939-1942 135
9 The Psychoanalytic Impact on American Psychiatry, 1917-1940 157
10 Teachers of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis, and Psychosomatic Medicine: Adolf Meyer, Harry Stack Sullivan, Flanders Dunbar, Franz Alexander 167
Pt. II Rise and Crisis: 1942-1985 185
11 World War II: Psychoanalytic Warriors and Theories 187
12 The Subculture of the Psychoanalysts 211
13 Psychoanalysis and Science: American Ego Psychology 231
14 The Rise of a Psychoanalytic Psychiatry, 1945-1965 245
15 Expanding Applications: Psychosomatic Medicine, Schizophrenia, the "Borderline" Personality 257
16 The "Golden Age" of Popularization, 1945-1965 276
17 The Decline of Psychoanalysis in Psychiatry, 1965-1985 300
18 A Diminishing Psychoanalytic Realm 322
19 Popular Images of Controversy: Freud's Changing Reputation and the Psychotherapy Jungle 345
20 The Crisis of American Psychoanalysis 360
Conclusion 380
Abbreviations 395
Notes 399
Index 465
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)