Rise

Rise

4.3 6
by Anoushka Shankar
     
 

The daughter of sitar maestro Ravi Shankar took the long way to this au courant world-fusion album. Studying and performing alongside her father, Anoushka pursued the rigorous training in Indian classical music that separates the true practitioners from most global travelers: Two albums of straight ragas proved her bona fides. Rise, though, is the kind ofSee more details below

Overview

The daughter of sitar maestro Ravi Shankar took the long way to this au courant world-fusion album. Studying and performing alongside her father, Anoushka pursued the rigorous training in Indian classical music that separates the true practitioners from most global travelers: Two albums of straight ragas proved her bona fides. Rise, though, is the kind of recording that fans of the young sitarist have been hoping she'd make, because it's the kind of youthful crossover disc that makes all those thousands of years of tradition very, very sexy. From the cinematic opening, with its low, rumbling synthesizer (instead, it should be noted, of a low, rumbling traditional tambora), it ushers in a world ripe with exotica. But there's substance to the perfumed textures. Shankar wrote, arranged, produced, and recorded nearly everything here, and it's a musician's record, not a marketing executive's. Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, the Indian guitar virtuoso, is one of the masters on hand, confirming Shankar's offbeat sensibilities when it comes to the music of her homeland. Exploring the vocal rhythm technique of teental on the one hand and nouveau flamenco on the other, Shankar follows a wide-ranging muse. Her playing is consistently fluid and flawless, but one gets the clear message that her instrument is only part of the picture here. The album is the sound of a thoughtful musician with a serious legacy making a personal declaration -- indeed, the daughter also rises.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Chris Nickson
The daughter of Ravi Shankar moves far from the tradition on her fourth solo album, using her considerable sitar skills (understandably, she'll never be her father's equal, but who ever will?) as just part of her arsenal on an album that strives hard to blend the past and cutting edge. It succeeds in part, as on "Solea," where Indian and flamenco meet, the two opposite ends of the gypsy road, and discover they have much in common, or on "Red Sun 4," where the Indian tradition of vocal percussion called konnokol seems as modern as anything to emerge from drum programming. At other times, the album seems to float too weightlessly on a cloud of miasma. "Sinister Grains" is a case in point: it's pretty, and certainly well executed. But when it's over, it's hard to remember, as ephemeral as a pleasant summer breeze. "Voice of the Moon" fares somewhat better, more grounded in its Indian-ness, with an arching melody. But even that's countered by the album's opener, "Prayer in Passing," which seems too much like an alaap without a theme, a prelude that leads to nothing, form without substance. Shankar uses plenty of programming on this, adding voices (including her own), palmas, piano, guitar, and other unusual textures, which certainly bring variety to what she does. And with "Ancient Lore," the epic (11-minute) closer, she actually pulls it all together (thankfully without the didgeridoo that's there on one earlier cut), the judicious use of reverb giving a certain ambience, and a reminder that she's a sitar player whose roots lie on both East and West and she improvises. Rise isn't perfect, by any means, but it's the first step on a new path.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/27/2005
Label:
Angel Records
UPC:
0724358029529
catalogNumber:
80295
Rank:
51622

Tracks

Read More

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Anoushka Shankar   Primary Artist,Keyboards,Sitar,Palmas
Vishwa Mohan Bhatt   Veena,Mohan Vina
Pedro Eustache   Percussion,Didjeridu,Bansuri,Duduk
Tarun Bhattacharya   Santoor
Bikram Ghosh   Percussion,Tabla,Vocals,Pakhawaj Drum
Ajay Prasanna   Bansuri,Shehnai
Rajendra Prasanna   Shehnai
Tanmoy Bose   Tabla,Vocals,Djembe
Sukanya Shankar   Tanpura
Sanjeev Chimmalgi   Vocals
Rajesh Mishra   Vocals
Pedro Ricardo Mino   Piano,Piano Strings,Palmas
Barry Phillips   Cello
Ritesh Mishra   Vocals
Pulak Sarcar   Keyboards
Jesse Charnow   Drums

Technical Credits

Ravi Shankar   Composer
Greg Calbi   Mastering
Bikram Ghosh   Sound Effects,Live Sound
Eli Wolf   Arranger,Engineer,Administration
Anoushka Shankar   Arranger,Composer,Lyricist,Producer,Audio Production,Live Sound
Tara Leigh Chiari   Director
Chris Cofoni   Arranger,Engineer,Administration
Tapan Raj   Programming
Gaurav Raina   Arranger,Composer,Programming,Producer,Engineer
Gautam Kaul   Engineer
Pedro Ricardo Mino   Live Sound
Barry Phillips   Engineer

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >