Rise of Global Civil Society: Building Communities and Nations from the Bottom Up

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Overview


Global news is generally bad news. On the surface, the story is about war, poverty, ethnic and sectarian strife. Democracy movements advanced by the U.S. government seem to be stalled or even reversed. Yet just below the surface, more hopeful trends are brewing. A new global awareness of the people at "the bottom of the pyramid" is summoning forth an unprecedented response to human need and suffering. It involves a shift from vertical to horizontal power that official aid agencies are only beginning to ...
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The Rise of Global Civil Society: Building Communities and Nations from the Bottom Up

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Overview


Global news is generally bad news. On the surface, the story is about war, poverty, ethnic and sectarian strife. Democracy movements advanced by the U.S. government seem to be stalled or even reversed. Yet just below the surface, more hopeful trends are brewing. A new global awareness of the people at "the bottom of the pyramid" is summoning forth an unprecedented response to human need and suffering. It involves a shift from vertical to horizontal power that official aid agencies are only beginning to comprehend. Whereas twenty-five years ago, government aid accounted for 70 percent of all American outflows, today 85 percent of all outflows of resources come from private individuals, businesses, religious congregations, universities, and immigrant communities. If aid policy in the twentieth century relied on top-down bureaucracy dominated by policy specialists and elites, the twenty-first century is shaping up as an era in which citizens, social entrepreneurs, and volunteers link up to solve problems. U.S. military and economic power are basic components of America's presence in the world; but in an environment of rampant anti-Americanism, it is compassion that is America's most consequential export. Civil society, once the distinctive characteristic of American democracy, is now advancing across the globe, carrying with it new forms of philanthropy, citizenship, and volunteerism. Tens of thousands of voluntary associations are prying open closed societies from within, solving problems in new ways, and forming the seedbed for a long-term cultivation of democratic norms. Building Nations from the Bottom Up: The Global Rise of Democratic Society presents a sweeping overview of the forces now shaping the global debate, including citizen-led development projects, poverty-reduction strategies that substitute opportunity for charity, and electronically linked movements to combat corruption and autocratic rule.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594032141
  • Publisher: Encounter Books
  • Publication date: 3/25/2008
  • Pages: 300
  • Product dimensions: 6.49 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 1.18 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword: Poverty Reduction in the Age of Globalization     vii
Compassion: America's Most Consequential Export     1
The Core Elements of Community and Nation Building: The American Debate     29
The Great Foreign Aid Debate: Stingy or Generous?     46
From Aid Bureaucracy to Civil Society: Participation and Partnership     74
Wealth, Poverty, and the Rise of Corporate Citizenship     97
Microenterprise: Tapping Native Capability at the Bottom of the Pyramid     122
The Great Tsunami of 2004 and America's Generosity     145
Conflict or Collaboration? Religion and Democratic Civil Society     158
Understanding Anti-Americanism     186
Civil Society and Nation Building: Prospects for Democratization     214
Conflict and Reconciliation in the Context of Nation Building     242
Habits of the Heart: The Case for a Global Civic Culture     277
A Roadmap for Bottom-Up Nation Building in the Twenty-first Century     290
Acknowledgments     303
Notes     307
Index     325
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2012

    Eberly skillfully links civil society and international development

    Eberly raises important questions about the future of international development and casts a grand vision outside of the bondage of traditional foreign aid. An expert in civil society, Don Eberly declares the 21st century as the century of voluntary associations, showing how civil society will play (and has already played) an enormous role in developing nations. While Eberly's idealistic view of history and business occasionally obscures the points he is attempting to make, he prevents a convincing case to rethink the way that the developed world and developing world interact. If you have any interest in current events in the developing world and the future of civil society and international development, this book is a must read.

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