The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It's Transforming Work, Leisure, Community, and Everyday Life

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The Washington Monthly 2002 Annual Political Book Award WinnerThe Rise of the Creative Class gives us a provocative new way to think about why we live as we do today-and where we might be headed. Weaving storytelling with masses of new and updated research, Richard Florida traces the fundamental theme that runs through a host of seemingly unrelated changes in American society: the growing role of creativity in our economy.Just as William Whyte's 1956 classic The Organization Man showed how the organizational ...
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Overview


The Washington Monthly 2002 Annual Political Book Award WinnerThe Rise of the Creative Class gives us a provocative new way to think about why we live as we do today-and where we might be headed. Weaving storytelling with masses of new and updated research, Richard Florida traces the fundamental theme that runs through a host of seemingly unrelated changes in American society: the growing role of creativity in our economy.Just as William Whyte's 1956 classic The Organization Man showed how the organizational ethos of that age permeated every aspect of life, Florida describes a society in which the creative ethos is increasingly dominant. Millions of us are beginning to work and live much as creative types like artists and scientists always have-with the result that our values and tastes, our personal relationships, our choices of where to live, and even our sense and use of time are changing. Leading the shift are the nearly 38 million Americans in many diverse fields who create for a living-the Creative Class.The Rise of the Creative Class chronicles the ongoing sea of change in people's choices and attitudes, and shows not only what's happening but also how it stems from a fundamental economic change. The Creative Class now comprises more than thirty percent of the entire workforce. Their choices have already had a huge economic impact. In the future they will determine how the workplace is organized, what companies will prosper or go bankrupt, and even which cities will thrive or wither.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780465024773
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 12/23/2003
  • Series: Art of Mentoring
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 1.19 (d)

Meet the Author

Author of the bestselling The Rise of the Creative Class and Who's Your City?, Richard Florida is a regular columnist for The Atlantic. He has written for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Economist, and other publications. His multiple awards and accolades include the Harvard Business Review's Breakthrough Idea of the Year. He was named one of Esquire magazine's Best and Brightest (2005) and one of BusinessWeek's Voices of Innovation (2006). He lives in Toronto, Canada.
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Table of Contents

Preface to the Paperback Edition
Preface
1 The Transformation of Everyday Life 1
Pt. 1 The Creative Age
2 The Creative Ethos 21
3 The Creative Economy 44
4 The Creative Class 67
Pt. 2 Work
5 The Machine Shop and the Hair Salon 85
6 The Horizontal Labor Market 102
7 The No-Collar Workplace 116
8 Managing Creativity 129
9 The Time Warp 144
Pt. 3 Life and Leisure
10 The Experiential Life 165
11 The Big Morph (a Rant) 190
Pt. 4 Community
12 The Power of Place 215
13 The Geography of Creativity 235
14 Technology, Talent and Tolerance 249
15 From Social Capital to Creative Capital 267
16 Building the Creative Community 283
17 The Creative Class Grows Up 315
App. A Where the Numbers Come From 327
App. B Information on Updates 353
App. C The Memphis Manifesto 381
Notes 383
Acknowledgments 413
Index 417
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2009

    The Rise of the Creative Class has provoked more thought and discussion than any other publication in planning or economic development over the past decade.

    Whether you find it compelling in its conclusions, confusing in its statistical analysis, or a little too simplistic, it is still a must read for students and professionals in planning or economic development.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2004

    Insightful!

    The good news is, Richard Florida¿s book recognizes the growing economic and sociological impact of creativity. The bad news is that in just two years, it has lost some of its gloss. The collapse of the bull market, the popping of the dot.com bubble, the 9/11 trauma, each took some shine off of the creative economy, with its casual dress days, flexible schedules and free rides. But even though this appraisal occasionally sounds quaint, we believe that the book¿s faith in the transforming economic and social power of creativity, its broad view, and its excellent references and quotations make it worth recommending.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2002

    Progress at what cost?

    Great book by Florida, but I am always suspicious of folks who ride bikes in Pittsburgh--got to be a little whacky. Florida's statistical work is excellent. His conclusions from an economic perspective are wonderful (e.g. dump the NFL in your town). But he misses the point. San Francisco is his "star" city. Ever walk in downtown SF? Someone begging every ten feet. No one can afford to live there. This is good? He identifies his solution is in mobilizing the creative class. He makes statistical note of where the creative class lives and where they move. His problem is the problem of most academics--he can't define what is "good". He can only point to what is popular and what is experiencing economic growth. Yuch. Is that all there is? Case in point, there is a book out by a journalist from New York, the book is called Slice of America. It is about the author's journey across America to document people and the pies they love. Peach pie. Apple pie. Etc. You get it. People talk to her and invite her into their home. She is after a slice of America. Why? Cause she lives in New York. Florida's #3 town. She feels empy in New York. There is "nothing real there" she says in an interview on NPR. So she had to head out across America in search of finding something real so she could maintain her sanity. So if New York is so good.... I guess my point is that Florida makes the basic mistake of pushing us to another excess. In the 80's it was sports teams in cities. In the 21st Century it will be the Bohemian Index. Whatsamatter Richard? Do you just want more cities with bike paths so you dont have to ride up all those hills in Pittsburgh? Or do you really not have a clue on what makes a culture, on what makes a people? It isnt just economic growth. It isnt just a fat job market. Maybe you need to study great cultures. Maybe you need tour Europe for a few years and come back with a new approach. Otherwise this is just another psuedo Marxist elixer--populism with a twist of economic growth.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2002

    A Boring Academic Read that Reveals an Absolutely Right-On Concept

    This book describes what a creative community looks like and how it can help local economies. It needs to lose the old-fashioned SAS charts and elaborate more about the idea. The academic nature of this book, unfortunately, makes it an uninteresting read overall. Another downside is that its statistics focus on entire metropolitan areas instead of local neighborhoods and specific areas of cities. Regardless, the message of the book is ahead of its time. Finally, someone has sparked needed debate and interest in urban policy issues. Factories and steel mills are out--quirky quality of life is in. The metro areas that understand, embrace and implement these concepts will be the winners. Others will wither into oblivion. The creative class is becoming a "movement" and a household name. The book's message is powerful, evident, and happening around the country. (In spite of all of those awful graphs and charts!)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2009

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