The Rise of the Network Society: The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture

Overview

This book is an account of the economic and social dynamics of the new age of information. Based on research in USA, Asia, Latin America, and Europe, it aims to formulate a systematic theory of the information society which takes account of the fundamental effects of information technology on the contemporary world.

The global economy is now characterized by the almost instantaneous flow and exchange of information, capital and cultural communication. These flows order and ...

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Overview

This book is an account of the economic and social dynamics of the new age of information. Based on research in USA, Asia, Latin America, and Europe, it aims to formulate a systematic theory of the information society which takes account of the fundamental effects of information technology on the contemporary world.

The global economy is now characterized by the almost instantaneous flow and exchange of information, capital and cultural communication. These flows order and condition both consumption and production. The networks themselves reflect and create distinctive cultures. Both they and the traffic they carry are largely outside national regulation. Our dependence on the new modes of informational flow gives enormous power to those in a position to control them to control us. The main political arena is now the media, and the media are not politically answerable.

Manuel Castells describes the accelerating pace of innovation and application. He examines the processes of globalization that have marginalized and now threaten to make redundant whole countries and peoples excluded from informational networks. He investigates the culture, institutions and organizations of the network enterprise and the concomitant transformation of work and employment. He shows that in the advanced economies production is now concentrated on an educated section of the population aged between 25 and 40: many economies can do without a third or more of their people. He suggests that the effect of this accelerating trend may not be mass unemployment but the extreme flexibilization of work and individualization of labor, and, in consequence, a highly segmented social structure.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781557866172
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/1/1996
  • Series: Information Age Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 576
  • Product dimensions: 6.02 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 1.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Manuel Castells is Professor of Sociology and of Planning at the University of California, Berkeley, where he was appointed in 1979, after teaching for 12 years at the University of Paris. He has also taught and researched at the Universities of Madrid, Chile, Montreal, Campinas, Caracas, Mexico, Geneva, Copenhagen, Wisconsin, Boston, Southern California, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, Amsterdam, Moscow, Novosibirsk, Hitotsubashi and Barcelona. He is the author of 20 books, including The Informational City (Blackwell, 1989). He has been a Guggenheim Fellow, and a recipient of the C Wright Mills Award and of the Robert and Helen Lynd Award. He is a member of the European Academy. The Information Age is being translated into 10 languages.

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Table of Contents

List of figures.

List of tables.

Acknowledgements.

Prologue: The Net and the Self.

Technology, Society, and Historical Change.

Informationalism, Industrialism, Capitalism, Statism: Modes of Development and Modes of Development and Modes of Production.

The Self in the Informational Society.

A Word on Method.

Part I: The Information Technology Revolution:.

Which Revolution?.

Lessons from the Industrial Revolution.

The Historical Sequence of the Information Technology Revolution.

Models, Actors, and Sites of the Information Technology Revolution.

The Information Technology Paradigm.

Part II: The Informational Economy and the Process of Globalization:.

Introduction.

Productivity, Competitiveness, and the Informational Economy.

The Global Economy: Genesis, Structure, and Dynamics.

The Newest International Division of Labor.

The Architecture and Geometry of the Informational/Global Economy.

Appendix: Some Methodological Comments on Adjustment Policies in Africa and their Evaluation.

Part III: The Network Enterprise: the Culture, Institutions, and Organizations of the Informational Economy:.

Introduction.

Organizational Trajectories in the Restructuring of Capitalism and in the Transition from Industrialism to Informationalism.

Information Technology and the Network Enterprise.

Culture, Institutions, and Economic Organization: East Asian Business Networks.

Multinational Enterprises, Transnational Corporations, and International Networks.

The Spirit of Informationalism.

Part IV: The Transformation of Work and Employment: Networkers, Jobless, and Flexitimers:.

The Historical Evolution of Employment and Occupational Structure in Advanced Capitalist Countries: the G-7, 1920-2005.

Is there a Global Labor Force?.

The Work Process in the Informational Paradigm.

The Effects of Information Technology on Employment: Toward a Jobless Society?.

Work and the Informational Divide: Flextimers.

Information Technology and the Restructuring of Capital-labor Relationships: Social Dualism or Fragmented Societies?.

Appendix A: Statistical Tables for Chapter 4.

Appendix B: Methodological Note and Statistical References.

Part V: The Culture of Real Virtuality: the Integration of Electronic Communication, the End of the Mass Audience, and the Rise of Interactive Networks.

Introduction.

From the Gutenberg Galaxy to the McLuhan Galaxy: the Rise of mass media culture.

The New Media and the Diversification of Mass Audience.

Computer-Meditated Communication, Institutional Control, Social Networks, and Virtual Communities.

The Grand Fusion: Multimedia as Symbolic Environment.

The Culture of Real Virtuality.

Part VI: The Space of Flows:.

Introduction.

Advanced Services, Information Flows, and the Global city.

The New Industrial Space.

Everyday Life in the Electronic Cottage: the End of Cities?.

The Transformation of Urban Form: the Informational City.

The Social Theory of Space and the Theory of the Space of Flows.

The Architecture of the End of History.

Space of Flows and Space of Places.

Part VII: The Edge of Forever: Timeless Time:.

Introduction.

Conclusion: The Network Society.

Summary of Contents of Volumes II and III.

Bibliography.

Index.

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