Rising Tides [NOOK Book]

Overview




Nine people have gathered for the reading of Aurore Gerritsen's will. Some are family, others are strangers. But all will have their futures changed forever when a lifetime of secrets is finally revealed.

Aurore Gerritsen left clear instructions: her will is to be read over a four-day period at her summer cottage on a small Louisiana island. Those who don't stay will ...
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Rising Tides

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Overview




Nine people have gathered for the reading of Aurore Gerritsen's will. Some are family, others are strangers. But all will have their futures changed forever when a lifetime of secrets is finally revealed.

Aurore Gerritsen left clear instructions: her will is to be read over a four-day period at her summer cottage on a small Louisiana island. Those who don't stay will forfeit their inheritance. With the vast fortune of Gulf Coast Shipping at stake, no one will take that risk.

Tensions rise as Aurore's lawyer dispenses small bequests, each designed to expose the matriarch's well-kept secrets. Longtime loyalties are jeopardized and shocking new alliances are formed as the family feels the sands of belief shifting beneath their feet.

As a hurricane approaches and survival itself is threatened, the fourth day dawns and everyone waits for the final truth to be revealed.


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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This sequel to Iron Lace (Mira, 1996) begins as Aurore Gerritsen's family is called together for the reading of her will. Generations of prejudice and discrimination committed by and against this unlikely assortment of characters is brought out into the open during the four days they're forced to spend together. More a family saga than a romance, this novel features a multilayered plot, vivid descriptions, and a keen sense of place and time. Although this is a stand-alone story, read Iron Lace first. Richards's Woman Without a Name (Silhouette, 1996) is a 1997 Rita finalist in the Romantic Suspense category. She lives in Ohio. (SM)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781426874390
  • Publisher: MIRA
  • Publication date: 11/1/2010
  • Sold by: HARLEQUIN
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 113,778
  • File size: 757 KB

Meet the Author


Emilie Richards’s many novels feature complex characterizations and in-depth explorations of social issues, a result of her training and experience as a family counselor, which contribute to her fascination with relationships of all kinds. Emilie, a mother of four, lives with her husband in northern Virginia, where she is currently working on her next novel for MIRA Books.


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Read an Excerpt

Rising Tides


By Emilie Richards

MIRA

Copyright © 2005 Emilie Richards
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0778322491

September 1965

The young man Dawn Gerritsen picked up just outside New Orleans looked like a bum, but so did a lot of students hitchhiking the world that summer. His hair wasn't clean; his clothes were a marriage of beat poet and circus performer. To his credit, he had neither the pasty complexion of a Beatles-mad Liverpudlian nor the California tan of a Beach Boy surfer. In the past year she had seen more than enough of both types making the grand tour of rock bands and European waves.

The hitchhiker's skin was freckled, and his eyes were pure Tupelo honey. Biloxi and Gulfport oozed from his throat, and the first time he called her ma'am, she wanted to drag him to a sun-dappled levee and make him moan it over and over until she knew, really knew, that she was back in the Deep South again.

She hadn't dragged him anywhere. She didn't even remember his name. She was too preoccupied for sex, and she wasn't looking for intimacy. After three formative years in Berkeley, she had given up on love, right along with patriotism, religion and happily-everafters. Her virginity had been an early casualty, a prize oddly devalued in California, like an ancient currency exchanged exclusively by collectors.

Luckily her hitchhiker didn't seem to be looking for intimacy, either. He seemed more interested in the food in her glove compartment and the needle on her speedometer. After her initial rush of sentiment, she almost forgot he was in the car until she arrived in Cut Off. Then she made the mistake of reaching past him to turn up the radio. It was twenty-five till the hour, and the news was just ending.

"And in other developments today, State Senator Ferris Lee Gerritsen, spokesman for Gulf Coast Shipping, the international corporation based in New Orleans, announced that the company will turn over a portion of its land holdings along the river to the city so that a park can be developed as a memorial to his parents, Henry and Aurore Gerritsen. Mrs. Gerritsen, granddaughter of the founder of Gulf Coast Shipping, passed away last week. Senator Gerritsen is the only living child of the couple. His brother, Father Hugh Gerritsen, was killed last summer in a civil-rights incident in Bonne Chance. It's widely predicted that the senator will run for governor in 1968."

Although the sun was sinking toward the horizon, Dawn retrieved her sunglasses from the dashboard and slipped them on, first blowing her heavy bangs out of her eyes in her own version of a sigh. As she settled back against her seat, she felt the warmth of a hand against her bare thigh. One quick glance and she saw that her hitchhiker was assessing her with the same look he had, until that moment, saved for her Moon Pies and Twinkies. Dawn knew what he saw. A long-limbed woman with artfully outlined blue eyes and an expression that refuted every refined feature that went with them. Also a possible fortune.

He smiled, and his hand inched higher. "Your name's Gerritsen, didn't you say? You related to him?"

"You're wasting your time," she said.

"I'm not busy doing anything else."

She pulled over to the side of the road. A light rain was falling and a harder one was forecast, but that didn't change her mind. "Time to stick out your thumb again."

"Hey, come on. I can make the rest of the trip more fun than you can imagine."

"Sorry, but my imagination's bigger than anything you've got."

Drawling curses, he reclaimed his hand and his duffel bag. She pulled back onto the road after the door slammed shut behind him.

She was no lonelier than she had been before, but after the news, and without the distraction of another person in the next seat, Dawn found herself thinking about her grandmother, exactly the thing she had tried to avoid by picking up the hitchhiker in the first place. This trip to Grand Isle had nothing to do with pleasure and everything to do with Aurore Le Danois Gerritsen.

On her deathbed, Aurore had decreed that her last will and testament be read at a gathering at the family summer cottage. And the reading of the will was a command performance.

The last time Dawn drove the route between New Orleans and Grand Isle, she'd only had her license for a year. South Louisiana was a constant negotiation between water and earth, and sometimes the final decision wasn't clear. She had flown over the land and crawled over the water. Her grandmother had sat beside her, never once pointing out that one of the myriad drawbridges might flip them into murky Bayou Lafourche or that some of the tiny towns along the way fed their coffers with speed traps. She had chatted of this and that, and only later, when Aurore limped up the walk to the cottage, had Dawn realized that her right leg was stiff from flooring nonexistent gas and brake pedals.

The memory brought an unexpected lump to her throat. The news of her grandmother's death hadn't surprised her, but neither had she truly been prepared. How could she have known that a large chunk of her own identity would disappear when Aurore died? Aurore Gerritsen had held parts of Dawn's life in her hands and sculpted them with the genius of a Donatello.

Some part of Dawn had disappeared at her uncle's death, too. The radio report had only touched on Hugh Gerritsen's death, as if it were old news now. But it wasn't just old news to her. Her uncle had been a controversial figure in Louisiana, a man who practiced all the virtues that organized religion espoused. But to her he had been Uncle Hugh, the man who had seen everything that was good inside her and taught her to see the same.

Two deaths in two years. The only Gerritsens who had ever understood her were gone now. And who was left? Who would love her simply because she was Dawn, without judgment or emotional bribery? She turned up the radio again and forced herself to sing along with Smokey Robinson and the Miracles.

An hour later she crossed the final bridge. Time ticked fifty seconds to the minute on the Gulf Coast. Grand Isle looked much as it had that day years before when she had temporarily crippled her grandmother. Little changed on the island unless forced by the hand of Mother Nature. The surf devoured and regurgitated the shoreline, winds uprooted trees and sent roofs spinning, but the people and their customs stayed much the same.



Continues...

Excerpted from Rising Tides by Emilie Richards Copyright © 2005 by Emilie Richards. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 27 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 6, 2012

    WOW.....

    Emilie Richards has done it again.......This is the sequel to Iron Lace, and as someone who lived through Hurricane Betsy, she has gotten it right. Never seen some of the twists coming....

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2013

    Great reaf

    Lots of turns

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    Twin room

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Really enjoyed this book. Love books with New Orleans history in them.

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  • Posted January 5, 2011

    i love it !!!!

    my favorite !!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2005

    Love never Dies

    I've just finish reading Iron Lace I read Rising Tides first. I loved those books they kept me on my toes with the characters it like being their yourself, back in times ..The books were good reading, that reminds you of what happen in the day and is still going in some of those areas today....Good writing I would recommend these books to others if they don't know about the southern areas .....

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2004

    A Let Down

    Emilie Richards is new to me and after having read _Iron Lace_ I couldn't obtain _Rising Tides_ fast enough. This sequel turned into a long and disappointing read for me. The twists and turns with interpersonal relationships had my head spinning, not to mention the coincidences were a bit far fetched. The chapters written during the war overseas were boring and drawn out to the point where I contemplated speed reading through the pages, something I never entertain doing. The ending was anti climatic at best. In my opinion _Iron Lace_ should have remained a stand alone novel.

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