Risked [NOOK Book]

Overview

Jonah and Katherine journey to 1918 with the Romanov children in the sixth book of the New York Times bestselling The Missing series.

It’s a paradox: When Jonah and Katherine find themselves on a mission to return Alexei and Anastasia Romanov to history and then save them from the Russian Revolution, they are at a loss. Because in their own time, the bones of Alexei and Anastasia have been positively identified through DNA testing. What hope ...
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Risked

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Overview

Jonah and Katherine journey to 1918 with the Romanov children in the sixth book of the New York Times bestselling The Missing series.

It’s a paradox: When Jonah and Katherine find themselves on a mission to return Alexei and Anastasia Romanov to history and then save them from the Russian Revolution, they are at a loss. Because in their own time, the bones of Alexei and Anastasia have been positively identified through DNA testing. What hope do they have of saving Alexis and Anastasia’s lives when the twenty-first century has proof of their deaths?
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Editorial Reviews

Booklist
“Thrill ride through a historical incident.”
Kirkus Reviews
The time-traveling middle schoolers are back for a trip to rescue Anastasia and Alexis Romanov from their 1918 murderers. Thirteen-year-old Jonah and his sister, 11-year-old Katherine, take an unplanned trip back in time to the house in Russia where the Romanovs were executed. Time-travel criminals Gary and Hodge have escaped from time prison by tricking Daniella and Gavin, the modern-day versions of Anastasia and Alexis. Friend Chip comes along for the ride. Once they arrive in 1918, the kids learn that they have landed at the site of the Romanovs' execution, to be carried out in the early hours of the next day. They also discover, to their horror, that their Elucidator, the device that controls their movement through time, has been modified so that it cannot take them back to the present. Fortunately it can, however, make Jonah, Katherine and Chip invisible, a function the kids immediately use after guards capture them when they arrive. The story continues with the suspense fans have come to expect in this entertaining and discreetly educational series, taking everyone into the cellar where the Romanovs were murdered and acting out several scenarios while playing with time. As always, this story has great potential to spark interest in a historical event while keeping young readers entertained and fascinated. Plenty of fun and great for history teachers as well. (Science fiction. 8-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442426474
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 9/3/2013
  • Series: Missing Series , #6
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 27,970
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Margaret Peterson Haddix is the author of many critically and popularly acclaimed YA and middle grade novels, including The Missing series and the Shadow Children series. A graduate of Miami University (of Ohio), she worked for several years as a reporter for The Indianapolis News. She also taught at the Danville (Illinois) Area Community College. She lives with her family in Columbus, Ohio. Visit her at HaddixBooks.com.
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Read an Excerpt

Risked


Jonah Skidmore took a deep breath as he peered at the, computer screen in front of him. He’d recently survived time travel, a war zone, betrayal, deception, mutiny, and the near destruction of time itself. So surely he was brave enough to call up a list of names on a computer.

Wasn’t he?

He kept his finger poised over the computer mouse.

I’ll be brave enough in a minute, he told himself. Or . . . two.

“What’s wrong?” his sister, Katherine, said from behind him. “Did Google lock up or something? Hit that link again.”

Patience wasn’t one of her virtues. Before Jonah had a chance to reply, she shoved her hand over his, pressing his finger down on the mouse.

“There,” Katherine said. “Just what we need. Famous missing children in history. Let’s see . . .”

There was a good chance that Jonah’s name might be on the list coming up on the computer screen before them. Not his real name—not Jonah Skidmore. But his original name. The name he’d been born with.

To keep from actually looking at the screen now, Jonah whirled in his seat to glare at Katherine.

“Keep your voice down!” he commanded. “Do you want Mom or Dad to hear?”

Unfortunately for Jonah, his parents were the kind who believed all those warnings about monitoring kids’ computer use. So the Skidmore family computer was right smack in the middle of the kitchen. And Mom and Dad were just around the corner and down the hall, where they were hanging Jonah’s and Katherine’s newest school pictures along the staircase.

Mom and Dad had no clue that Jonah and Katherine had traveled through time again and again and again, their lives in danger in one century after another.

But even without the complications of time travel and historical danger and intrigue, Jonah wouldn’t have wanted his parents to know how desperate he was to find out his preadoption identity.

Not that I exactly want to know it, he told himself. I just . . . need to.

“Mom and Dad wouldn’t mind us talking about history,” Katherine said, barely bothering to lower her voice. Then she leaned in closer and dropped her voice to a total whisper: “Do you think you might be the Russian kid?”

She pointed to a name on the screen.

Jonah grimaced so fiercely he could barely see.

What if I’m wrong about everything? he wondered. What if there’s some chance my other identity will never actually matter? Can’t I go on ignoring it and pretending it doesn’t exist?

He knew the answer to that question: No. He couldn’t. He was only thirteen—and Katherine was not quite twelve—but in the last few months they’d learned that the past had a way of coming back and grabbing you.

Sometimes literally.

That is not the right way to think about time travel, Jonah told himself. Remember, you have a new attitude now.

He forced himself to open his eyes wide enough to read the words on the screen before him—and then wider still, in indignation.

“Alexis Romanov?” he protested. “No way—that’s a girl’s name!”

Katherine reached over Jonah’s shoulder and clicked on a link for the name.

“No, it’s a guy,” she corrected. “It’s Russian, remember? Sometimes he’s listed as Alexis, sometimes Alexei. Same kid, just different translations. Definitely a boy. See?”

Phrases jumped out at Jonah from the screenful of information she’d called up: heir to the throne of the Russian empire . . . World War I . . . Russian Revolution . . . Alexis was imprisoned with the rest of his family . . . then in 1918 the Bolsheviks decided . . .

Jonah didn’t know much about Russian history—or anything about it, actually—but he was pretty sure that things hadn’t gone well for this Alexis or Alexei Romanov back in 1918.

Well, duh, Jonah told himself. Kids don’t vanish from history because everything’s going great. All of us were in some kind of danger.

For most of his life, Jonah had believed what his parents believed: that he was a perfectly ordinary kid in a perfectly ordinary family, growing up in a perfectly ordinary Ohio suburb. He was adopted and his sister wasn’t—that was the only detail about him that had ever seemed the least bit unusual. And Jonah’s attitude toward that little fact had always been, Well, so what? Who cares?

Then the mysterious letters had begun arriving, and Jonah had found out that he wasn’t an ordinary adoptee.

Not at all.

Instead, he and thirty-five other kids were, depending on how you looked at it, either refugees from history or children audaciously stolen from the past. Or both at once. The only reason he and the other kids were growing up now, at the start of the twenty-first century, was because their kidnappers had crash-landed in this time period with a planeload of stolen babies. Fearing the wrath of time agents determined to keep history on its original track, the kidnappers had abandoned the babies and run away, vowing to come back for them as soon as they could.

At least we got thirteen years of happy ignorance before everyone started fighting over us again, Jonah thought.

And that wasn’t the right way to think either. Ignorance wasn’t a good thing. Jonah and Katherine had traveled back and forth through history multiple times in the past few months, repairing time and rescuing other kids endangered by their own time periods. How many times on those trips had ignorance almost gotten someone killed?

Let’s see . . . in 1483 . . . 1485 . . . 1600 . . . 1605 . . . 1611 . . . 1903 . . .

Jonah had returned from his last trip through time vowing to face up to even the facts he desperately didn’t want to know.

Facts like what his original identity in history actually was.

Just yesterday he’d asked JB, the time agent he knew best, to finally reveal it.

This may have been a little unfair. After their last trip through time, JB was going through an identity crisis of his own. It probably wasn’t surprising that JB had refused to tell.

So Jonah had decided to take matters into his own hands.

Because you never know, Jonah told himself. You never know when I might be zapped back in time, when I might have to deal with whatever historical mess this Alexis or Alexei Romanov—or whoever I really am—had to deal with. I refuse to take another time-travel trip blind!

He made himself focus on the words on the screen and read them in order, not skipping around:

Alexis Romanov, the last tsarevitch of Russia, was born in 1904. He had four older sisters—Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia—but as the first and only male child of Tsar Nicholas II, he was the designated heir, intended from birth to inherit the throne. At that time, the Russian empire covered a sixth of the globe . . .

Jonah stopped reading.

“If I really was, like, the future leader of Russia, don’t you think I’d . . .” He let his voice trail off, because there was no way he could say what he was thinking. If I really am this kid, shouldn’t I feel more special? Shouldn’t I be smarter, more talented—more obviously someone capable of ruling a sixth of the planet?

“What? Do you think you should look more like a prince—or a ‘tsarevitch’ or whatever the Russians called it?” Katherine teased. “Do you think you shouldn’t look like such a goofball?”

“How I should look . . . ,” Jonah muttered. “Duh, Katherine, we’re idiots. In 1918 they had cameras. They—”

He stopped explaining and started typing instead. He clicked back over to Google and started an image search for Alexis or Alexei Romanov.

Within seconds he’d called up a picture of a boy in a sailor suit. The kid was maybe nine or ten, and staring unsmilingly toward the camera. It was a black-and-white image, so it was impossible to tell if the boy’s hair was brown or just dark blond. It was impossible to tell eye color. It was impossible to tell why the boy looked so serious. But Jonah could tell one thing for sure:

“It’s not me,” he said, relief swimming over him.

Katherine squinted at the picture.

“Maybe you just think that because it’s such an old picture, and you’re used to seeing yourself in this century,” she said. “Or—you know how sometimes people don’t look like themselves in one particular shot?”

Jonah clicked the back arrow, returning to the lineup of dozens of images of Alexis/Alexei Romanov. He reached to the top of the computer desk, where Mom had stashed the packets of the other copies of his and Katherine’s school pictures, ready to be handed out to various relatives at Thanksgiving. He shook out a five-by-seven of himself and held it up beside the computer screen.

“See?” he said. “No way that’s me.”

“Okay,” Katherine said softly.

She was looking too closely at the picture of Jonah. Jonah couldn’t help staring at it too.

Did anybody like his or her seventh-grade school picture? Jonah’s hair stuck up in a weird way, and his grin was both crooked and too wide. But there was something else about the picture that bothered Jonah.

It was taken back in September, before I got the first letter. Before I went back in time for that first trip. It might as well have been a million years ago.

The Jonah in the picture looked too baby-faced, too unformed, too innocent.

Too ignorant.

It hurt, just looking at this picture of the kid Jonah had once been.

No wonder Katherine was doubtful about Jonah and Alexei/Alexis’s appearance. Even Jonah didn’t look like himself anymore.

He turned the picture facedown and slipped it back into the packet at the top of the computer desk. He caught only a glimpse of the packet of Katherine’s school pictures, the multiple images of her blond hair, her blue eyes, and her confident gaze, which seemed to say, You think there are going to be a lot of mean girls in sixth grade? So what? I’m not worried!

As if that was all Katherine was ever going to have to worry about.

Katherine looked like a total little kid in her school pictures from a few months ago too.

“Oh, hey,” he said loudly, trying to distract himself and Katherine. He pointed back toward the computer screen. “Why are all these pictures of girls mixed in with the images of the boy Alexis? Maybe you’re wrong after all.”

Katherine took control of the mouse and the keyboard again.

“No, those are his sisters,” she said, clicking through images until she came to a large one of four girls in lacy white dresses and Alexis/Alexei—looking much younger—in yet another sailor suit. “Do you remember, back in the time cave, back in the beginning of all this, when we saw all the names of the missing kids from history on that plane? Two Romanovs were on that list, weren’t they? Alexis and Anastasia?” She zoomed in until only the two youngest children showed on the screen. “Do these kids look familiar?”

Jonah frowned. He had met almost all of the other kids stolen from history in the time cave, the day the original kidnappers had come back hoping to retrieve each one of them. But Jonah didn’t have quite enough imagination to mentally replace the old-fashioned lace dress and sailor suit in the picture of the Romanovs with the modern jeans and T-shirts and sweatshirts the other kids had been wearing in the time cave.

“I don’t know,” Jonah said irritably.

Anastasia and Alexis Romanov seemed to stare back at him from the computer screen, their expressions plaintive and pleading. Jonah wished he’d never thought to look for pictures. Now that he knew he himself wasn’t a Romanov, he didn’t want to learn anything else about these kids. It was too much of a burden. He already had to worry about his friends Chip and Alex, trying to recover from the trauma of the 1400s, and his friend Andrea, who’d wanted to stay in 1600 even though it was a complete mess, and Emily, who—

Katherine gasped beside him. Jonah turned and saw that she’d gone totally pale.

“What’s wrong with you?” he muttered.

“Everyone’s just supposed to be missing, right?” Katherine asked, her voice shaking. “You and the other kids—you just vanished from history and nobody was ever supposed to know what happened to you. Isn’t that how it was always supposed to be? For all thirty-six of you?”

“Uh, sure,” Jonah said uneasily. “Why?”

Katherine raised a trembling hand and pointed to a sentence Jonah hadn’t noticed before, directly below the picture on the screen.

“Because,” Katherine said. “Because this says Anastasia and Alexis Romanov are dead.”

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 49 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(39)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 49 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2013

    Well here goes...

    So for the most part, I did kind of like the story in this book. It was fun and fast paced and had interesting comparisons between pre-timetravel Jonah and post-timetravel Jonah. But for whatever reason, I just didn't enjoy this book as much as I have others in the series and by MPH. For one thing, the lack of limits on what the people from the future can do kind of bugs me. So what, now not only can they travel through time, make people into babies again and use this device that can do just about everything and even fits into the palm of your hand, but they can also fake human remains and cure just about every uncurable disease that's been mentioned. Great. Good to know.

    Then there's the fact that the rules they do have are unclear. We can only go into the cellar for thirty seconds because ot's damaged time, but we could only go in there in the first place because it was especially damaged then.

    Am I the only one who thinks these rules are getting silly?

    I love MPH. I adored the Shadow children series, and I've been reading this series since it came out. But I'm tired of the overcomplicated, unexplained rules and the long drawn out mystery of who Jonah is. And I'm deathly afraid that's going to be a huge dissapointment. If it's going to be 'Jonah was born in the early twenty first century, and he's living out his own history as he goes through life in our time' I'm going to throw a hirst fit and write a strongly worded letter. I'll be seriously annoyed if MPH tries to back out like that.

    Anyways, I'm being a little picky and a lot ranty. Like I said, the book was alright overall, but not as good as the rest of the series, especially the first and second ones, which were my particular favorites. And did I mention that a lot of it seemed really coincidental? No? Well it was. I get that she had a lot less wiggle room because it's such a well known story, unlike most of the other books, but come on. The plot could have been constructed better. As it was, it seemed a little lazy. But that's just me.

    5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2014

    Hi

    Oh my f#$%&* God who the h#$% is jonah!!!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2013

    What!

    When the crap did the sixth book come out?! I didnt even get to read the fifth yet! And um duhhh to below! If you can read than you will see it says that in the freaking summary. Great books!

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    Hey

    Nico is gay

    2 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2013

    Cool

    Series is awesome I want to get it

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2013

    Love it

    Buy this book if your life depends on not buying it

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    Risked

    Anonymous on November 22nd, this book has 194 pages.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2013

    Wa?

    My brother has this book. Is it good? If it is or isnt of something, reply if it is to wikiddragon by january 17 2014

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2013

    ASWEOME SHE IS MY FAVORITE AUTHER I READ HER BOOKS WHEN SIX

    Yeah

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2013

    Thrilling

    Cant wait for sequel

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2014

    To all

    How is it

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2014

    free ipad

    Kiss your hand thre times and post this on thre other books

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2014

    This

    ?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2014

    The Calm Before the Storm-23

    Sorry, I didn't post yesterday. I had a beach party! Now I'm so happy because I met this really cute guy. I think he likes me. He is 14! He hasn't asked me out yet. SK, I write you a story for your next story. Hope you use it. Next part at Sought. This part will be in Merida's pov. •••••••••••••• My dream was very distrubing. The sorceress kept entering my dreams. She would always be in her palace of darkness and despair. The furry Chewbacca creature was there too." Ma'am they got past our camp.", the creature said." That was all part of the plan, Bruno." "I really hate that name.", said Bruno." Who cares? I like it.", the sorceress said." But Pas–!", Bruno said. The sorceress stopped him before he said her name." Shut up, fool! Someone is listening.", she waved her hand in my direction." Be gone!" ~~~~~~~~~~~ My dream shifted and I was in the middle of the woods." Simon, Jordan, Kim, and Kolby, go scout the area for the other demigods. They have explaining to do. They will never leave our grasp, alive.", said the voice of the girl, Skyler, I think. The four, standing in front of her, bounded off." Are you sure this is a good idea? They have eleven people with them.", said a goth looking kid." Max, I have made my desition. You will not change my mind. Besides, they are scouting the area. Not attacking. I have sent some of my best with them. Like Kim, she is an excellent bowmen. And Simon has that power to make people fall asleep. I don't know why that would be helpful. Kolby is the son of Neptune, I'm sure you know what he can do. Jordon is a wonderful stratagist. I think they're in good hands." "Yes, Skyler.", Max said." The rest of you will stay and watch over the camp. I must go supervise the scouting mission.", Skyler said, running off." I don't really like her.", said a girl with blonde hair and blue highlights." Amber! I wouldn't talk like that. Skyler can still hear you.", said a girl with golden hair in a French braid." Yes, Amber! Listen to Elle. She knows alot.", said a boy that had blonde hair and was leaning against a tree, twirling a dagger." Why, thank you, Carson! I always like it when you–. Did you hear that.", Elle said." Um, no!", Carson said." Exactly. Put out the fire. Draw your weapons.", Elle said. Amber, Carson, Max, and Elle drew their weapons. They waited. Out of nowhere, Amber fell on the ground grabbing her head. She dropped her weapon. Max and Carson did the same. Elle held on to her sword. Then the other three, stood up and attacked Elle. ~~~~~~~~~~ I woke up very scared. I had heard a scream. I didn't know who it was from. If it was from Elle, then they weren't far away. I sat up and didn't see anyone else." Hello? Guys?", I shouted." Don't shout in the woods, little hero. The monsters will hear you.", said a voice in the woods." Where are you?", I asked." Everywhere.", the voice echoed all around the woods. ••••••••••••••••••• How did you like it? SEA

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2014

    Find the l

    Tttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttlttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2014

    To S.E.A

    Post soon

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2014

    Find the i

    Lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll little tricky more to come

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Selena

    (I don't know. I lose things all the time....)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2014

    To find rhe d

    It is in i knew you never fin d it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2014

    Bob

    Bib

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 49 Customer Reviews

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