BN.com Gift Guide

Risking Truth: Reshaping the World through Prayers of Lament

Overview

Description:
Ours is a world characterized by change. Often the most fundamental changes in our lives result from experiences of profound suffering and loss as we are wrenched from our familiar world and driven into one that is alien. In the midst of such loss, we are compelled to choose between trying to cling to the remnants of a reality that is passing away and trying to make a home in a strange new world. Biblical prayers of lament wait for...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $10.97   
  • New (3) from $17.58   
  • Used (4) from $10.97   
Sending request ...

Overview

Description:
Ours is a world characterized by change. Often the most fundamental changes in our lives result from experiences of profound suffering and loss as we are wrenched from our familiar world and driven into one that is alien. In the midst of such loss, we are compelled to choose between trying to cling to the remnants of a reality that is passing away and trying to make a home in a strange new world. Biblical prayers of lament wait for us at this crossroad of loss and newness.
Prayers of lament are marked both by loss and by the inexplicable silence of God. Everything we believe about God's justice and goodness is placed in doubt by his hiddenness. The cry of lament is an act of tremendous risk. To lament is to abandon the sinking ship of religious certainty and strike out in a small dingy, amidst stormy seas, in search of a hidden God.
Faced with God's silence, the biblical writers are willing to place at risk their most fundamental beliefs and to lament. The Psalm writers risk the loss of the Exodus story by crying out to a God who has failed to save, demanding that he once more part the chaotic waters and make a way in the desert. Job risks the loss of a moral God by confronting God with his injustice. Jeremiah risks the loss of the covenant by calling out for God to return yet again to a faithless partner and a failed marriage. Matthew and John the Revelator recognize that the coming of Messiah is impelled by the cries of innocent sufferers. Throughout the Bible, lament risks the possible loss of relationship with God and presses for a new, though uncertain, experience of God's presence.

Endorsements:
Widespread attention to the practice of lament in the Bible is no doubt a measure of the sense of loss, hurt, and fear that mark our historical moment. Amid that widespread attention, Scott Ellington brings a peculiarly alert theological sensibility to the subject. He goes well beyond conventional critical approaches to see what is at stake in the practice of faith and what is at risk in the human enterprise of truth-telling, even when truth-telling shatters and jeopardizes old certitudes. The force of Ellington's exposition is further enhanced by his readiness to carry his study into the New Testament, there to find, amid the good news, the reality of loss and the hope for newness that only comes with truth-telling. This book merits wide and sustained attention from those who care about the quality of faith and the health of our common humanness.

-Walter Brueggemann author of Praying the Psalms, 2nd ed.

In Risking Truth, Scott Ellington continues the important work of exploring the topic of lament in Scripture. While he stands firmly on the shoulders of the great scholars who have studied the lament tradition in the past, his work offers a timeliness and accessibility to the subject that is rare in scholarly works and much-needed in the twenty-first century.

-Nancy L. deClaissé-Walford author of Introduction to the Psalms

In the Old Testament and in the New, real prayer involves real courage. It involves facing facts and owning them. It involves the risk of facing God with them and considering replacing old familiar convictions with new ones. It involves thinking about God in new ways. It is easier not to do any of that, but in this book Scott Ellington shows how the risk is worthwhile.

-John Goldingay author of Israel's Faith

About the Contributor(s):
Scott Ellington is Associate Professor of Christian Ministry at Emmanuel College in Franklin Springs, Georgia. He has served as a missionary educator in Mexico, England, and Germany. His Ph.D. is in Biblical Studies from the University of Sheffield.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781556352638
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/28/2008
  • Series: Princeton Theological Monograph Series
  • Pages: 216
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Scott Ellington is Associate Professor of Christian Ministry at Emmanuel College in Franklin Springs, Georgia. He has served as a missionary educator in Mexico, England, and Germany. His Ph.D. is in Biblical Studies from the University of Sheffield.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments ix Introduction xi
1 Why Should We Cry Out? 1
2 Risking an Imperfect God 33
3 Is the Story Still True? The Use of Lament in the Psalms 60
4 Risking the World in Job 94
5 Jeremiah and the Vocation of Shared Suffering 130
6 Can Messiah Come Without a Cry? Lament in the New Testament 163
7 The Shapes of Lament 183 Bibliography 193
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)