Ritalin Is Not the Answer: A Drug-Free, Practical Program for Children Diagnosed with ADD or ADHD / Edition 1

Ritalin Is Not the Answer: A Drug-Free, Practical Program for Children Diagnosed with ADD or ADHD / Edition 1

5.0 3
by David B. Stein Ph.D.
     
 

ISBN-10: 0787945145

ISBN-13: 9780787945145

Pub. Date: 02/28/1999

Publisher: Wiley

At Last! A Healthy, Drug-Free Alternative to RitalinNearly one-tenth of all school-aged children in the United States are being coerced into taking mood-altering drugs with side effects that include insomnia, tearfulness, rebound irritability, personality change, nervousness, anorexia, nausea, dizziness, headaches, heart palpitations, and cardiac arrhythmia. These

Overview

At Last! A Healthy, Drug-Free Alternative to RitalinNearly one-tenth of all school-aged children in the United States are being coerced into taking mood-altering drugs with side effects that include insomnia, tearfulness, rebound irritability, personality change, nervousness, anorexia, nausea, dizziness, headaches, heart palpitations, and cardiac arrhythmia. These are the children diagnosed with attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention deficit with hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Ritalin Is Not the Answer confronts and challenges what has become common practice and teaches parents and educators a healthy, comprehensive behavioral program that really works as an alternative to the epidemic use of medication-without teaching children to use drugs in order to handle their behavioral and emotional problems.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780787945145
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
02/28/1999
Edition description:
1 EDITION
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 9.07(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword by Peter R. Breggin, M.D.

1. What Are We Doing to Our Children?

2. Understanding the Myths of Attentional Disorders.

3. The Importance of Effective Parenting.

4. Beginning the Caregivers' Skills Program.

5. Improving Behaviors.

6. Punishment.

7. Beginning to Learn Discipline.

8. Using Time Out Correctly for the IA or HM Child.

9. Reinforcement Removal for Very Difficult Behaviors.

10. Improving School Performance.

11. Helping the IA or HM Child to Feel Better.

12. Ten Ways to Stop Creating an Attentional Disorder Child.

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Ritalin Is Not the Answer: A Drug-Free, Practical Program for Children Diagnosed with ADD or ADHD 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was very impressed by the book. Ever since my 5-year old son was "diagnosed" with ADHD, the journey to help him has shown me the "quick fix" and "quick label" mentality associated with this "diasease". The book has clearly given me two remarkable tangible results: I do not think of my son as "sick" and do not allow anyone to shrug their sholders and tell me that "he cannot help it" therefore he needs drugs. I do not accept anyone (myself included) to give up on him. The second major change for me was the concrete, behavioral approach Dr. Stein includes in his book. Finally, I had more than just theoretical discussions pro and con drugs but a real life approach to the behavioral manifestations. I am not sure that the key issue in this book is really to negate reasearch. I found the major point Dr. Stein makes is to give parents dealing with the problem something very valid to think about, before making a decision whether or not to use drugs. Furthermore, it helps to withstand the pressure from the "professional" community such as pediatricians, educators, counselors and other parents to "just put him on Ritalin, it'll calm him". And believe me, the pressures are real. Thank you very much for a helpful, insightful and most of all compassionate book on this topic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a valuable book to give any parent; it provides 'tools' in their bag of tricks to encourage healthy discipline in the home. This book is where the rubber meets the road for parents dealing with an 'inattentive' or 'misbehaving' child; especially in the school years.