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The Rite: The Making of a Modern Exorcist
     

The Rite: The Making of a Modern Exorcist

3.9 130
by Matt Baglio
 

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The inspiration for the film starring Anthony Hopkins, journalist Matt Baglio uses the astonishing story of one American priest's training as an exorcist to reveal that the phenomena of possession, demons, the Devil, and exorcism are not merely a remnant of the archaic past, but remain a fearsome power in many people's lives even today.

Father Gary Thomas

Overview

The inspiration for the film starring Anthony Hopkins, journalist Matt Baglio uses the astonishing story of one American priest's training as an exorcist to reveal that the phenomena of possession, demons, the Devil, and exorcism are not merely a remnant of the archaic past, but remain a fearsome power in many people's lives even today.

Father Gary Thomas was working as a parish priest in California when he was asked by his bishop to travel to Rome for training in the rite of exorcism. Though initially surprised, and slightly reluctant, he accepted this call, and enrolled in a new exorcism course at a Vatican-affiliated university, which taught him, among other things, how to distinguish between a genuine possession and mental illness. Eventually he would go on to participate in more than eighty exorcisms as an apprentice to a veteran Italian exorcist. His experiences profoundly changed the way he viewed the spiritual world, and as he moved from rational skeptic to practicing exorcist he came to understand the battle between good and evil in a whole new light. Journalist Matt Baglio had full access to Father Gary over the course of his training, and much of what he learned defies explanation.

The Rite provides fascinating vignettes from the lives of exorcists and people possessed by demons, including firsthand accounts of exorcists at work casting out demons, culminating in Father Gary's own confrontations with the Devil. Baglio also traces the history of exorcism, revealing its rites and rituals, explaining what the Catholic Church really teaches about demonic possession, and delving into such related topics as the hierarchy of angels and demons, satanic cults, black masses, curses, and the various theories used by modern scientists and anthropologists who seek to quantify such phenomena.

Written with an investigative eye that will captivate both skeptics and believers alike, The Rite shows that the truth about demonic possession is not only stranger than fiction, but also far more chilling.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for The Rite

“There are chilling descriptions of exorcists battling demons in The Rite … Baglio has strong storytelling skills, and constructs a narrative that travels a long distance quickly."
LA Times

“Matt Baglio’s book is a wake-up call. It smashes the many myths created by Hollywood movies and other amateurs on the subject about exorcism and the role of the exorcist in the Catholic Church.”
— Father Basil Cole, O.P., professor of moral and spiritual theology of the Pontifical Faculty at the Dominican House of Studies, Washington, D.C.

"Journalist Balgio follows a Catholic priest through the latter’ s training to become an exorcist in this incisive look at the church’s rite of exorcism and its use in contemporary life. Baglio began delving into the topic after hearing about a course at a Vatican-affiliated university, where he met and befriended the Rev. Gary Thomas, a priest in the diocese of San Jose, Calif. Thomas took the exorcism course at the request of his bishop and subsequently apprenticed himself to a seasoned exorcist. Keenly aware of the misunderstanding that abounds about exorcism through film images, Baglio sets about dispelling misconceptions and does so skillfully, separating the real from the imaginary in the mysterious and unsettling sphere of the demonic. Both Thomas and Baglio were changed by their exposure to the rite. Thomas grew spiritually during the process, which bolstered his desire to help his parishioners, and Baglio, previously a nominal Catholic, reconnected with his faith. For anyone seeking a serious and very human examination of this fascinating subject, one that surpasses the sensational, this is absorbing and enlightening reading."
— Publishers Weekly, starred review

"The Rite is in my opinion one of the best books ever written on the topic of exorcism. I have read very few books that give a description as appropriate, as precise, or as detailed, and the author's deep knowledge of the subject makes it a true instrument of knowledge useful for many people."
– Fr. José Antonio Fortea, author of Interview With an Exorcist: An Insider's Look at the Devil, Demonic Possession, and the Path to Deliverance

"Truth is stranger than fiction ... and far more terrifying. Forget what Hollywood tells you about demonic possession and exorcism; The Rite will open your eyes to the awesome truth about such things. I've been investigating paranormal events for some time, but this book taught me much that I didn't know about the timeless battle for the human soul waged between the forces of good and evil. Fascinating, inspiring, and scary, a great read."
— John Kachuba, author of Ghosthunters: On the Trail of Mediums, Dowsers, Spirit Seekers, and Other Investigators of America's Paranormal World

“What sets Baglio’s book apart from many other contemporary works on the same subject is its sober, measured tone and steady refusal to sensationalize the subject.”
– Amy Wellborn

From the Hardcover edition.

Publishers Weekly

Journalist Baglio follows a Catholic priest through the latter's training to become an exorcist in this incisive look at the church's rite of exorcism and its use in contemporary life. Baglio began delving into the topic after hearing about a course at a Vatican-affiliated university, where he met and befriended the Rev. Gary Thomas, a priest in the diocese of San Jose, Calif. Thomas took the exorcism course at the request of his bishop and subsequently apprenticed himself to a seasoned exorcist. Keenly aware of the misunderstanding that abounds about exorcism through film images, Baglio sets about dispelling misconceptions and does so skillfully, separating the real from the imaginary in the mysterious and unsettling sphere of the demonic. Both Thomas and Baglio were changed by their exposure to the rite. Thomas grew spiritually during the process, which bolstered his desire to help his parishioners, and Baglio, previously a nominal Catholic, reconnected with his faith. For anyone seeking a serious and very human examination of this fascinating subject, one that surpasses the sensational, this is absorbing and enlightening reading. (Mar. 10)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

Chanting prayers and slinging holy water, the cinematic exorcist faces the forces of evil with strength and faith. But what of his real-life counterpart? In his first book, journalist Baglio follows Brother Gary, an American Roman Catholic priest, as he learns about exorcism firsthand during a sabbatical in Rome, first through a university class and later through an apprenticeship with an Italian exorcist. Spectacular exorcisms do occur, but most of the book focuses on other topics, from Father Gary's early life to the scientific controversies surrounding exorcism. The Rite provides more questions than answers: Why do some exorcists use methods not approved by the Church? Has the popularity of alternative religions led to a rise in possessions and exorcisms, as Baglio's interviewees maintain? If exorcism is a Christian ritual, why does it benefit Hindus and Muslims? More guidance as to how readers might explore these questions would be welcome, but this book is recommended for all public libraries as a place to begin the dialog.
—Dan Harms

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385522717
Publisher:
Crown Religion/Business/Forum
Publication date:
06/15/2010
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
134,170
Product dimensions:
8.12(w) x 5.34(h) x 0.69(d)

Read an Excerpt

Prologue

The thirty-five-year-old woman lay on a padded folding massage table, her arms and legs held by two men. She wore a black Puma sweat suit and her dark brown hair was pulled back tightly into a ponytail. While not heavy, she was a little on the stocky side; and as she grunted and struggled, the men fought to hold on. Nearby, another man and woman hovered, ready to intervene. The exorcist stood a few feet away, a small crucifix in one hand and a silver canister filled with holy water in the other. Surveying the scene, he had a decision to make. The exorcism had been going on for the better part of an hour, and the strain was beginning to show on everyone. Should he continue?

Suddenly the woman's head turned, her eyes fixating on a spot near the far wall. "No!" the demon said in a deep guttural voice coming from deep within her, "the one in black is here, the jinx!"

The exorcist felt a momentary ray of hope, knowing from past exorcisms that this was the demon's code to describe Saint Gemma Galgani.

"And the little white one from Albania!" the demon roared.

"Mother Teresa of Calcutta?" the exorcist asked.

The demon let fly a string of blasphemies in a rage, then his voice took on a mocking childlike tone. "Oh, look at them! Look at them! They are hugging and greeting each other!" Then, back to a deep guttural rasp, "Disgusting! Disgusting!"

To the woman lying on the table, the two figures appeared as if in a dream. Saint Gemma was dressed in her traditional black, and looked very much as she had in her twenties. Oddly, Mother Teresa also looked very young--perhaps only twenty-five.

The exorcist glanced over his shoulder to where the woman was staring and saw nothing but the blank wall. "Let us thank Saint Gemma Galgani and Mother Teresa for being here with us today," he said.

"No, him too. Send him away, send him away!" the demon wailed.

Unsure of who had just arrived, the exorcist added, "I say thank you that he is here."

Then suddenly the woman sat bolt upright, her arms extended in front of her as if she'd been yanked up by some unseen force. "Leave me alone!" the demon screamed, even as the woman flailed to break free from the invisible grasp. The two men went to pull her back down, but the exorcist motioned for them to stop. "Let's see who just came. In the name of Jesus and the Immaculate Virgin, who is this person?"

"Nooooooo!" the guttural, ferocious voice growled. "Totus tuuuuuus!"

The exorcist smiled inwardly, recognizing the Latin motto. "Thank you, Holy Father John Paul II, for coming to help our sister," he said.

"No, no!" the demon shrieked. "Damn you! Get away from me!"

Again, in her dreamlike state, the woman watched Pope John Paul II, who seemed no older than thirty and was dressed all in white, bless her forehead three times.

Wanting to take advantage of the apparent reinforcements, the exorcist pressed on. "Repeat after me: Eternal Father, you are my Creator and I adore you," he said to the demon.

"Up yours!" the voice responded.

"Eternal Father, you are my Creator and I adore you," the exorcist insisted.

"A bomb is going to explode if I say it!" the demon shouted.

"I order you, in the name of the Immaculate Virgin Mary and in the name of Jesus Christ, to repeat those words," the priest commanded again.

All at once, the woman felt awash in an incredible feeling of love as the veiled figure of Mary appeared before her, wrapped in a gold and white veil that covered half her face. Watching in amazement as the figure approached, the woman was even more surprised to see that Mary was gazing at her tearfully.

As the exorcist watched, the demon once again went into a fit. "No, no, no, don't cry!" he screamed, and the woman's body practically convulsed.

Then for an instant the woman snapped out of the trance, saying, "A tear from Mary is all it took," before falling back into the state.

The exorcist was elated to know that Mary was present and helping. He instantly launched into a Hail Mary. Everyone in the room joined in, even the woman on the table. Yet somehow the exorcist knew it wasn't over. The demon must be hiding to allow her to recite the prayer, he thought. "Say after me: Eternal Father, you are my Creator and I adore you," he said to the demon.

The woman thrashed and screamed. "No!" the demon barked. "I'm not going to say it! I must not say it, I can't; it is against everything."

The exorcist could feel that the demon was weakening. He asked everyone in the room to kneel. "Eternal Father, you are my Creator and I adore you," he intoned, while everyone repeated him.

The woman, sensing the torment of the demon, saw all the saints in the room respond as well.

"No, no, even those other ones kneeled down--the white one, the black one, and the little white one," the demon said. Then the exorcist noticed that the demon's voice changed slightly to a tone of forced reverence when he added, "Her, her [Mary]--she kneeled down as well."

This must be it, the exorcist thought. The demon is going to break. "In the name of Jesus Christ, I order you to repeat the phrase."

The woman struggled, but slowly a croaking noise came from her throat. "Eee . . . ter . . . nal . . . Fa . . . ther . . . , I must . . . ad . . . ooor . . . yooou."

Ecstatic, but realizing it was still not over yet, the exorcist made the demon repeat the phrase two more times. When the demon had finished, the exorcist recited the conclusion of the Eucharistic prayer:  "Through him, with him, in him, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, all glory and honor is yours, Almighty Father, forever and ever."

"This humiliation was given for the glory of God, not because you commanded it but because God commanded it. You are damned," the demon said, addressing the exorcist.

The exorcist did not falter. "Che Dio sia benedetto," he continued, God be praised.

"I go away but you are going to be damned for life," the demon sneered. "You and your companions, you are going to be persecuted for life!"

*

When people hear the word exorcism, many think of images made popular by Hollywood films--girls writhing in torment, their bodies contorting in impossible ways as they launch a continuous stream of pea-soup-green projectile vomit. In truth, such theatrics, as well as those in the woman's exorcism that took place in January 2007, in Rome, Italy, are quite rare. Instead, exorcisms can be rather mundane, almost like going to the dentist--complete with a stint in the waiting room and a card to remind the recipient of his or her next appointment. The reality is that few people realize what goes on during an exorcism, and that is true for Catholic priests as well--many of whom would just as soon forget that exorcism exists at all.

The word exorcism itself is an ecclesiastical term that comes from the Greek exorkizo, meaning "to bind with an oath," or to demand insistently. During an exorcism, a demon is commanded in the name of God to stop his activity within a particular person or place. As understood by the Catholic Church, an exorcism is an official rite carried out by a priest who has been authorized to do so by his bishop. In ancient times, exorcism was an important way for early Christians to win converts and prove the veracity of the faith. The power itself comes from Jesus, who performed numerous exorcisms as detailed in the New Testament, later instructing his disciples to do the same.

In light of the tremendous advances in modern medicine--including a more sophisticated understanding of neurological and psychological illnesses, the advent of psychoanalysis, and similar advantages--the rite of exorcism has become an embarrassment to many within the Church, who see it as a superstitious relic from the days when illnesses like epilepsy and schizophrenia were considered "devils" to be cast out.

Much of this misunderstanding comes from the nature of exorcism itself, as well as from the Devil's attributes that have more foundation in folklore than theology. A beast with horns and half a goat's body ravaging innocent virgins in the dead of night? Soul-leaching, shape-shifting she-demons on the prowl for their next victim? Without courses on demonology to educate seminarians, it's no wonder priests have turned away in droves from this exorcism stuff.

At the core of the issue lies the problem of evil. Is it a physical reality, a fallen angel called Satan (as the Catechism of the Catholic Church, a small but dense book of about 900 pages says), or is it a lack of good in something, an inability to live up to the designs of the benevolent Creator?

Many priests, not wanting to turn their backs on the rich history associated with their faith, while at the same time wanting to embrace the modern view of reality in which the Devil is seen as a metaphor, would like to have it both ways. Others believe in the traditional teachings, but prefer not to talk about it. On the extreme end, some priests just flat out deny the Devil's existence.

Ironically, while many priests and bishops seemed bent on skepticism, the general public has become enamored with the occult, gravitating to new religions such as Wicca. According to an American Religious Identity Survey, Wicca grew in America from 8,000 members in 1990 to over 134,000 in 2001. (By 2006, that number was said to have risen to more than 800,000.) Sales of occult and New Age books have also skyrocketed, as has the number of people who believe in angels and demons (according to a 2004 Gallup poll, about 70 percent of Americans said they believe in the Devil). All this coincides with an explosion in the numbers of people who say they are afflicted by evil spirits. According to the Association of Italian Catholic Psychiatrists and Psychologists, in Italy alone, more than 500,000 people see an exorcist annually.

For many years, a small but vocal group of overworked exorcists in Italy, led by Father Gabriele Amorth, has tried to get the Church to take the increasing numbers of people who claim to be possessed more seriously. First, they said, more exorcists need to be appointed. However, the Church would have to ensure that any new exorcists be properly trained. Advocates such as Father Amorth assert that in the past, too many exorcists were appointed in name only. In addition, some of these "untrained" exorcists gave the rite of exorcism a bad name by abusing their authority. One of the most egregious cases took place in 2005, when a Romanian nun who'd been gagged and bound to a crucifix in a room at her convent was found dead; the priest who had been performing the exorcism was charged with murder.

Hoping to rectify the situation, in the fall of 2004 the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith sent a letter to the various Catholic dioceses around the world, starting with those in America, asking each bishop to appoint an official exorcist.

At the same time, a Vatican-affiliated University in Rome began putting together a groundbreaking course entitled "Exorcism and the Prayer of Liberation" with the intention of educating a new cadre of exorcists about the official teachings of the Church on the Devil and exorcism.

A remarkable American priest answered this call and traveled to Rome in the summer of 2005 to be trained as an exorcist. Over the span of nine months he delved deeply into a world he never knew existed, completing the course and participating in over eighty exorcisms along with a senior Italian exorcist. As a result, his view of the world--and his place in it¯changed dramatically, and he later returned to the United States, determined to use his new awareness of evil and its manifest presence to help people in their everyday lives.

From the Hardcover edition.

Meet the Author

MATT BAGLIO, a reporter living in Rome, has written for the Associated Press and the International Herald Tribune.

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The Rite: The Making of a Modern Exorcist 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 130 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you are expecting this book to be anything like a Hollywood movie; you're gonna be sadly mistaken. This is a very "dry read" but worth the time. If you can manage to get through the first 60 - 75 pages consisting of approx. 95% factual research and 5% story; you will be presently surprised to see the story begin to unfold. This book isn't so much a story (as in a fictional thriller) as it is a research-based telling of experiences. The author's attempt at educating people (primarily Americans) about exorcism is successful. I learned far more about excorsim than I had ever imagined possible. I expected a "thriller" when I first picked up this book so at first, I was disappointed but once I decided to stick with it and continue on (the reading can be very arduous at times) I was pleased to discover that the book was, in fact, taking me on a journey. This is a good book, if you can be patient and are looking to learn more about exorcism. If you are looking for a "thriller", you'd probably be best off looking somewhere else.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book really opens your eyes to the "secret" of the ritual of exorcism in the Catholic Church.It is words for thought.To actually follow a Priest from becoming chosen by his Bishop to become an exorcist,through his training,to his "calling" is life-altering.I highly recommend this book for all .
Smooth59 More than 1 year ago
I found the book very good and more documentary like than trying to tell a made up story and I think that adds to the reality of the demonic side that exists. This is written with the view of Catholic beliefs and so I did not accept a few of the dogma of the church. But that did not sway the fact that the book was very fair and honestly written. Father Thomas now lives in Chicago. The fact that there is a constant war of good and evil this book does a great job revealing true events of this truth.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! The author takes a balanced look at the subject matter, but is honest about its effect on him (see author's note at end of book). Great place to start if you have an interest in exorcism. Bibliography gives many great places to go from here. Note: This is the book that the upcoming film of the same name is based on.
BeccaAZ More than 1 year ago
After hearing the author, Matt Baglio in a radio interview I thought the book sounded interesting and decided to buy it. The book is very interesting and the thing I liked about it is that it is written from a journalists eye. Not sensational rather straight forward. That is exactly what I wanted given the subject at hand. I felt like I was sitting in the room with the priests as they were performing the exorcisms!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Before I purchased this book I read a number of the customer reviews. While many were positive, many were not as much so. Although still intrigued enough to buy it my expectations were therefore a bit subdued. I think ones reaction to the book depends greatly on where you are coming from as you approach the book. I am an ordained Lutheran pastor with 25 years in the ministry. Having ministered to people in all walks of life and having dealt with evil, the stories in this book were very believable and helpful as I reflected on my own experiences. The mix of history and technical background with actual narrative suited me quite well. I came to the book with a real desire to know more about the Rite of Exorcism as well as the experiences of those who have had to deal with the demonic. I found myself 'highlighting' several sentences as I read, knowing I would want to find this information later. The book was very well balanced and easy to read. It was neither "dry" and overly technical, nor did it simply skim the surface with a string of stories. It also was dramatic without falling into the sensational. I did not find the book at all difficult to work through, and looked forward to each time I sat down to read it. I would highly recommend the book, but not to those who are skeptical about the faith and the ministry of the church, nor to those having only a passing interest in things theological or spiritual.
shananogins More than 1 year ago
I wasn't sure what to expect, but knew that I wanted to read the book after seeing the movie. "The Rite" the book surprised me. Fairly well-written, it details the story of a seasoned priest learning how to become an exorcist, and in detailing his journey, introduces the reader in a fairly pragmatic way to exorcism and the Catholic church's current stance on it. Most surprising, I found this to be a book about faith, as Fr. Gary describes exorcism as a healing ministry, a ministry offered by he church to help those afflicted. When understood in this light, the concept is slightly demystified, but nonetheless haunting, and thought-provoking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was informative, touching and unsettling. It's uncomfortable to be aware of the vast amounts of evil that exist.
mboersch More than 1 year ago
This book scared the hell out of me! It's got everything a person would want to know about demons, Satan's powers and exorcism. A fast-paced, educational read. The author did a good job thoroughly researching the topic. The scariest part of all is it's real.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Rite - The Making of A Modern EXORCIST by Matt Baglio is a treasure! This compelling story answers numerous questions about good vs. evil in modern times. If you saw the film; you'll really enjoy the book. Fr. Gary Thomas allows the reader to delve into an almost archaic ritual, which is very present in modern times. This book is not for the squeamish, but rather those who which to know the truth. The book is outstanding!!!
WalkByFatith More than 1 year ago
This book is highly accurate for showing how the Church in Rome deals with training their Preists to work with the viles of the Occult...IE: the Devil and his minions. Rome has fancied itself as the standard for hundreds of years as being the sole and best authority on how to deal with the Occult and Daemons. This book shows how the "world authority" trains and fumbles at times when it trains it's preists for the deliverance ministry. At the same time the book does show that even thought the Church in Rome fumbles when it trains, the senior Preists that the students study under do a good job with getting the newbies up to speed. If you are interested in reading about man's journy to Rome to learn how to deal with the Occult then this is an excellent book. It gives a behind the walls look at how the Church in Rome opperates and trains it's Preists to combat the Occult and it gives some real life examples of what the dliverance ministry is. This book is a must read for any seminary student and a possible read for the lay person interested in the Deliverance Ministry.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book was great and informative. Except for the fact that the brief quote on seances and voodoo didn't include that the Catholic Church views voodoo and seances as sins. The Catechism of the Catholic Church states in paragraph 2116 that "2116 All forms of divination are to be rejected." and in paragraph 2117 "All practices of magic or sorcery, by which one attempts to tame occult powers, so as to place them at one's service and have a supernatural power over others - even if this were for the sake of restoring their health - are gravely contrary to the virtue of religion. These practices are even more to be condemned when accompanied by the intention of harming someone, or when they have recourse to the intervention of demons. Wearing charms is also reprehensible. Spiritism often implies divination or magical practices; the Church for her part warns the faithful against it. Recourse to so-called traditional cures does not justify either the invocation of evil powers or the exploitation of another's credulity."
micheleof46 More than 1 year ago
Excellent history of the rite of exorcism. The movie was good but the book gives all the background that let up to the movie. Read the book to understand the movie.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It started off pretty slow... too much background information on the priest in my opinion. It picked up about half way through. All in all, pretty good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a complete overview of exorcism coupled with stories of brave priests battling the forces of evil. 5 times better than the movie.
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