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The River Bank: And Other Stories from The Wind in the Willows
     

The River Bank: And Other Stories from The Wind in the Willows

5.0 1
by Kenneth Grahame, Inga Moore (Illustrator)
 

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When Mole goes boating with the Water Rat instead of spring-cleaning, he discovers a world he never knew about. As well as the river and the Wild Wood, there is Toad's craze for fast travel - which leads him and his friends on a whirl of trains, barges, gipsy caravans and motor cars, into a lot of trouble, and even a battle.

Overview

When Mole goes boating with the Water Rat instead of spring-cleaning, he discovers a world he never knew about. As well as the river and the Wild Wood, there is Toad's craze for fast travel - which leads him and his friends on a whirl of trains, barges, gipsy caravans and motor cars, into a lot of trouble, and even a battle.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Mary Jane Begin illustrates the classic story of Mole, Badger, Rat and Toad, The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Each chapter opens with a vignette and includes a full-page painting of a dramatic moment in the proceedings.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
a makeover for mole Inga Moore's exquisite new color illustrations for The River Bank: And Other Stories from `The Wind in the Willows' situate Kenneth Grahame's classic story in a disarmingly pretty English countryside, from lush, leafy riverbed to impossibly delicate snowscape. Her ink and pastel artwork shares the fineness of Ernest H. Shepard's original illustrations, but has its own luminous glow and easy-going humor. The text selections, what the flap copy calls "the very best moments" from the first five chapters of the book, snake around the illustrations.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
I've been asked many times about giving children the classics to read. Generally, I think the least successful way to introduce the classics is by just handing them to a child to read. The highest success rate comes through books shared in family reading. A parent's enthusiasm for and remembered joy from a classic book will make all the difference. You can introduce your children to the wonders of Toad Hall with The River Bank and Other Stories from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame, newly illustrated by Inga Moore.
Children's Literature - Catherine Campbell Wright
This classic tale of the simple pleasures of country life and the dependability of good friends is recaptured beautifully by Moore's richly patterned and warmly detailed illustrations. Mole, Mr. Toad, Badger and Rat amble through their adventures with kindness, courage and curiosity, as Moore's captivating pictures draw readers right into each page. We cannot help but imagine ourselves sitting in the dinghy with Mole and Rat as they embark and explore the world beyond. Older readers will want to curl up by the fire and dive right in, while younger children will most certainly ask for this book to be read aloud again and again.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
If you haven't read this book aloud to your kids yet, get the seventy-fifth anniversary edition and introduce them to Toad, Mole, Ratty and Badger. Share the pictures with them, which include black-and-white sketches as well as full color plates. These are the only illustrations that were directly influenced by Grahame who entertained Shepard at his country home. They resonate with the stories. There are lessons to be learned and lots of laughs. It's a book that can be read and reread with messages that will be understood at different ages and stages of life. 1983 (orig.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Moore has freshened up five stories from Kenneth Grahame's classic with her exquisite pastel crayon-and-ink drawings. "The River Bank," "The Open Road," "The Wild Wood," "Mr. Badger," and "Dulce Domum" are sequential in their stories of Rat and Mole and their misadventures in the English countryside and Wild Wood, where Badger lives. Their fast and lasting friendship is intertwined with all the other characters children know and love: Otter, Toad, Badger, and the field-mice. Grahame's stories foster a sense of warmth and security, and Moore's well-laced, rich-toned illustrations carry that feeling throughout the book. There are several double-page spreads that are breathtaking to view. These stories are wonderful read-alouds because of dialogue among the characters. This one's a keeper.-Susan Garland, Maynard Public Library, MA
Carolyn Phelan
In spirit, in style, and in technique, Benson's illustrations for "The Wind in the Willows" are first cousins to the book's original ink drawings by Ernest H. Shepard, which many consider so nearly perfect any new artwork is superfluous. However, from the endpaper maps to the quiet scenes of woods and riverbanks to the comical pictures of Toad's adventures, Benson's sensitive cross-hatched drawings offer excellent interpretations of characters and events. The best choice for any library would be to add this to the collection and let children choose the version that suits them. If they come across the other editions later, it will be like looking through a cousin's photos of a long-ago family reunion: so familiar and so full of beloved characters, yet seen from a slightly different perspective. Any way you look at it, this new edition will be treasured.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763600594
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
11/04/1996
Edition description:
Abridged
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.36(h) x 0.66(d)
Age Range:
8 - 10 Years

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The Riverbank (The Wind in the Willows Series #1) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
GrandpaSandy More than 1 year ago
I have all the books in this delightfully adapted series based on Kenneth Grahame's classic THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS. My young granddaughters, 3 and a half and 1 and a half, love the books and want me to read and re-red them all the time. The illustrations are bright and merry, even when Mole ventures into the Wild Wood, and the text manages to capture some of the feeling of the complete book. I am pleased that these lovely versions for young readers are preparing my grandchildren for the day when we can read the full book together.