Road

Road

3.3 17
by Jack London
     
 

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The Road by Jack London - The Road is an autobiographical memoir by Jack London, first published in 1907. It is London's account of his experiences as a hobo in the 1890s, during the worst economic depression the United States had experienced up to that time. He describes his experiences hopping freight trains, "holding down" a train when the crew is trying to throw

Overview

The Road by Jack London - The Road is an autobiographical memoir by Jack London, first published in 1907. It is London's account of his experiences as a hobo in the 1890s, during the worst economic depression the United States had experienced up to that time. He describes his experiences hopping freight trains, "holding down" a train when the crew is trying to throw him off, begging for food and money, and making up extraordinary stories to fool the police. He also tells of the thirty days that he spent in the Erie County Penitentiary, which he described as a place of "unprintable horrors," after being "pinched" (arrested) for vagrancy. In addition, he recounts his time with Kelly's Army, which he joined up with in Wyoming and remained with until its dissolution at the Mississippi River.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
London hit the road long before Kerouac, hopping a train in 1894 at age 18 and traveling 10,000 miles as a hobo. He related his experiences in nine illustrated essays published in Cosmopolitan (not the one you're thinking of) between 1907 and 1908. This reprint is the inaugural volume in Rutgers's "Subterranean Lives" series, which will chronicle alternative looks at America. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442942769
Publisher:
ReadHowYouWant
Publication date:
07/13/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
361 KB

Meet the Author

John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 - November 22, 1916) was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London married Elizabeth "Bessie" Maddern on April 7, 1900, the same day The Son of the Wolf was published. Bess had been part of his circle of friends for a number of years.

London was part of the radical literary group "The Crowd" in San Francisco and a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers. He wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics, such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

In later life London indulged his wide-ranging interests by accumulating a personal library of 15,000 volumes. He referred to his books as "the tools of my trade".

In 1905, London purchased a 1,000 acres ranch in Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, California, on the eastern slope of Sonoma Mountain, for $26,450.

He wrote: "Next to my wife, the ranch is the dearest thing in the world to me." He desperately wanted the ranch to become a successful business enterprise.

Writing, always a commercial enterprise with London, now became even more a means to an end: "I write for no other purpose than to add to the beauty that now belongs to me. I write a book for no other reason than to add three or four hundred acres to my magnificent estate." After 1910, his literary works were mostly potboilers, written out of the need to provide operating income for the ranch.

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Road 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
shmuelman More than 1 year ago
This was an excellent book about Jack London bumming it for a few years as a youth. No doubt that these experiences radicalized him for the rest of his life. However, it the book was quite brutal and explicit in descriptions of the violence and injustice he witnessed, and I did not finish reading it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was surprised how much I enjoyed reading this at my age.
KenBreckenridge More than 1 year ago
Humorous and entertaining accounts of Jack London's hobo-ing days. These stories are classics, and I highly recommend this book to anyone with a sense of adventure.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in wearing armor that completely covers her body.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
U r not the real gandalf from LOTR rp. Ask the real gandalf to join. (I know the real gandalf in rl) please dont be inappropriate and r u trying to join? *eyes starts to turn into fire and black mist rushes at u* <p> GOLLUM: hisses at you and pounces at u
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hobbler result one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lourdes Garcia More than 1 year ago
sucks more ass