The Road to Paris

The Road to Paris

4.2 29
by Nikki Grimes, Myra Lucretia Taylor, Rosalyn Landor
     
 

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Paris has just moved in with the Lincoln family, and isn't thrilled to be in yet another foster home. She has a tough time trusting people, and she misses her brother, who's been sent to a boys' home. Over time, the Lincolns grow on Paris. But no matter how hard she tries to fit in, she can't ignore the feeling that she never will, especially in a town that's

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Overview

Paris has just moved in with the Lincoln family, and isn't thrilled to be in yet another foster home. She has a tough time trusting people, and she misses her brother, who's been sent to a boys' home. Over time, the Lincolns grow on Paris. But no matter how hard she tries to fit in, she can't ignore the feeling that she never will, especially in a town that's mostly white while she is half black. It isn't long before Paris has a big decision to make about where she truly belongs.

Nikki Grimes has created a portrait of a young girl who, in the midst of being shuffled back and forth between homes and realizing things about other people and the world around her, gradually embarks on the road to discovering herself.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Norah Piehl
Grimes, winner of the Coretta Scott King Award for Bronx Masquerade, offers a rare success story about foster care in this elegantly simple (but never simplistic) story. Eight-year-old Paris Richmond, on the road to yet another foster home, feels like she never really belongs anywhere: "‘Sometimes I wish I was like my name . . . somewhere far away, out of reach. Somewhere safe down south or on the other side of the ocean.' Instead, she is neither Paris nor Richmond. She felt like a nobody caught in the dark spaces in between. A nobody on her way to nowhere." Rejected by her mother, separated from her protective older brother, ostracized from both black and white communities by virtue of being biracial, Paris has a hard time trusting anyone. Convinced her newest foster placement with the Lincoln family will be a disaster like all the others, Paris only gradually realizes the extent of the family's kindness and learns to trust her foster brother's advice to "keep God in [her] pocket." In well-crafted prose, Grimes dramatizes both the best and worst of foster care situations, offering both a compelling character study and a discussion-provoking final scene.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-For eight-year-old Paris Richmond, home "was such a funny word." Because she and her older brother had moved from one foster home to another so often, it had come to mean not a place but a person. Malcolm was the one constant in her life. When they run away from an abusive home, they seek refuge with their grandmother, who returns them to the foster-care system. It is then that the siblings are placed in separate homes. Though Paris desperately misses Malcolm during her year with the Lincoln family, she gradually comes to trust them and even her own instincts. She gains coping skills through a newfound religious faith and the talent to share it through music. Her ability to keep "God in her pocket" allows her to overcome fears and difficulty. Her convictions allow her to endure inexcusable prejudice and malice as well as recognize the beauty and kindness around her. A poignant and plausible story, Paris is well crafted and simply but elegantly told. Even secondary characters are well drawn and recognizable as they grow, mature, and propel readers to a satisfying, hopeful, though not pat conclusion. Readers will pull for a successful life for Paris and Malcolm as they reunite with their mother and her new husband. They are also confident that Paris now knows what and where home really is.-Maria B. Salvadore, formerly at Washington DC Public Library Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Eight-year-old Paris Richmond has never had it easy. Her white father walked out on the family; her black mother tends to drink when she's lonely. Only Paris's older brother Malcolm is a constant, even when they are sent to live with an awful foster mother. When the children run away, Family Services separates them and Paris must face a strange new foster family and a new school on her own. The Lincolns turn out to be a good foster family, and Paris spends a year learning to trust others, God and herself. She finds not being entirely forthcoming can be as painful as being false, and she finds in her new strength forgiveness for her birth mother. Grimes has created a real little girl whose growth is perfectly paced and believable. The characters around her are not all perfectly realized, but Paris's story is touching and worth a place in most collections. Given the dearth of success stories featuring foster children and bi-racial characters, this is all the more important. (Fiction. 8-12)
From the Publisher
"In clear short chapters, Grimes tells a beautiful story of family, friendship, and faith from the viewpoint of a child in search of home in a harsh world. [I]t is the human story behind the case file that readers will remember." —Booklist, starred review

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781428163164
Publisher:
Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date:
07/20/2007
Series:
The Hathaways Series
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

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From the Publisher

"In clear short chapters, Grimes tells a beautiful story of family, friendship, and faith from the viewpoint of a child in search of home in a harsh world. [I]t is the human story behind the case file that readers will remember." —Booklist, starred review

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