BN.com Gift Guide

Road to Someplace Better: From the Segregated South to Harvard Business School and Beyond

Overview

The first black woman Harvard MBA tells the remarkable story of how she achieved the American dream

Lillian Lincoln Lambert rose from humble beginnings as a poor farm girl in the segregated South to become the first black woman to earn an MBA from Harvard Business School and, later, the founder of a $20 million maintenance company with 1,200 employees. In The Road to Someplace Better, she shares an inspiring personal journey that took her from dead-end jobs in New York City and ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $16.07   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   

Overview

The first black woman Harvard MBA tells the remarkable story of how she achieved the American dream

Lillian Lincoln Lambert rose from humble beginnings as a poor farm girl in the segregated South to become the first black woman to earn an MBA from Harvard Business School and, later, the founder of a $20 million maintenance company with 1,200 employees. In The Road to Someplace Better, she shares an inspiring personal journey that took her from dead-end jobs in New York City and Washington, D.C., to the ivory tower and the world of entrepreneurship. In addition to her own hard work and tenacity, she shows how her love of reading—instilled in her by her mother—spurred her to reach her goals. By sharing her inspiring life story, she helps others see that they, too, have the power to dream big, act bold, and achieve their goals.

  • Charts Lillian Lincoln Lambert's inspiring rise from a poor, rural upbringing in the segregated South to success as a barrier-breaking CEO and entrepreneur
  • Inspiring memoir of a groundbreaking business pioneer who broke down racial, gender, and social barriers to achieve unprecedented success
  • Lillian Lincoln Lambert received Harvard Business School's Alumni Achievement Award in 2003 and has been featured on Good Morning America and in Time, the Washington Post, and Entrepreneur
The Road to Someplace Better is a book you'll want to read whether you're interested in business, history, or an unforgettable story of personal triumph against the odds.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
* This is an old-fashioned rags-to-riches story that traces Lambert's upbringing as the daughter of God-fearing Virginia subsistence farmers to becoming the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Business School, in year TK, and later attaining success as a Maryland entrepreneur. Told in straightforward, no-nonsense prose, Lambert's memoir begins backward, from the shocking anecdote about arriving for a meeting of a group of powerful businesswomen in New York City in 1986 and being ushered to the kitchen. In fact, Lambert née Hobson worked as a maid when she first arrived in New York City in 1958, fresh out of high school from Ballsville, Va. (Her 1976 startup of a janitorial service in Maryland provides another irony.) Although her mother, a rare college graduate back in the rural South, wanted her daughter to go to college, Lambert resolved to support herself instead, faking references to get a job at Macy's, for example. After working as a clerk-typist in Washington, D.C., she finally applied to Howard University, where her marketing professor, H. Naylor Fitzhugh, one of the few black graduates of Harvard's business school told her she was “Harvard material” and should apply. She was accepted and in the fall of 1967 at 27 years old, she found herself homesick, overwhelmed by the work, but determined not to quit. Her account captures a historic epoch and offers some business strategies. (Jan.) (Publishers Weekly, October 19, 2009)
Publishers Weekly
This is an old-fashioned rags-to-riches story that traces Lambert's upbringing as the daughter of God-fearing Virginia subsistence farmers to becoming the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Business School, in year TK, and later attaining success as a Maryland entrepreneur. Told in straightforward, no-nonsense prose, Lambert's memoir begins backward, from the shocking anecdote about arriving for a meeting of a group of powerful businesswomen in New York City in 1986 and being ushered to the kitchen. In fact, Lambert née Hobson worked as a maid when she first arrived in New York City in 1958, fresh out of high school from Ballsville, Va. (Her 1976 startup of a janitorial service in Maryland provides another irony.) Although her mother, a rare college graduate back in the rural South, wanted her daughter to go to college, Lambert resolved to support herself instead, faking references to get a job at Macy's, for example. After working as a clerk-typist in Washington, D.C., she finally applied to Howard University, where her marketing professor, H. Naylor Fitzhugh, one of the few black graduates of Harvard's business school told her she was “Harvard material” and should apply. She was accepted and in the fall of 1967 at 27 years old, she found herself homesick, overwhelmed by the work, but determined not to quit. Her account captures a historic epoch and offers some business strategies. (Jan.)\
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470401668
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 1/19/2010
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 238
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Lillian Lincoln Lambert was the first black female Harvard MBA (1969), who in 2003 received Harvard Business School's Alumni Achievement Award, the highest award the school bestows on its alumni. For twenty-five years, she was president and CEO of Centennial One, Inc., a building maintenance company she founded in 1976 in her garage with a few thousand dollars. She grew the company to $20 million in sales and hired more than 1,200 employees. Lambert is the recipient of numerous other awards, including Black MBA Association's Entrepreneur of the Year, and Small Business Person of the Year in the State of Maryland. She has been featured on Good Morning America and in Time, the Washington Post, and Entrepreneur.

Rosemary Brutico is a freelance writer and principal of Quintessence Communication, a public relations firm. She is a former managing editor of MIT's Sloan Management Review.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword by Cathy Hughes.

Acknowledgments.

Prologue.

1 The Farm.

2 Fifth Avenue on a Wing and a Prayer.

3 In the Company of Angels.

4 Howard University and Lucky 13

5 Harvard Business School: 1967-1968

6 Harvard Business School: 1968-1969.

7 Life beyond Harvard.

8 Life as a Double Minority Entrepreneur.

9 The Birth of a Company.

10. Letting Go and Moving On.

11 Giving Back.

Epilogue.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 20, 2010

    The Road to Someplace Better

    I can not impress upon anyone how good The Road to Someplace Better is. It is one of the most motivational books I have ever read. No matter what is going on in your life Lillian Lincoln Lambert shows that YOU CAN MAKE IT. I strongly urge you to purchase this book. You will not be sorry.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 26, 2010

    A definite must read

    Lillian's book is a definite must read for every one of us, because she's such a role model in so many ways--especially for any woman who would like to own her own business or run her own enterprise. Her inspirational story about searching for 'some place better' truly turns into a "Yes I Can' call to all of us.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A MUST READ for those who dare to achieve their dreams in this lifetime!

    Lillian Lambert's memoir offers a candid and humbling account of her life's journey. She engages you from the very beginning, sharing details of both her "highs" and "lows" in such a way that you relate immediately recognize that nothing's impossible or unattainable with love, courage and devotion. The book is not only inspiring, but also a true guidebook on how to trust and be true to oneself, despite what may seem like insurmountable odds. I highly recommend for those who dare to live out their dreams in this lifetime!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 18, 2010

    Determination, Drive, and Rewards

    This book is an honest, forthright, refreshing, no-holes barred detailing of Lillian's journey to someplace. It's an informative, easy to identify with, fun reading memoir, detailing the vicissitudes of a forerunner enroute to "someplace" culminating in her self-fulfillment into retirement.

    The book demonstrates the importance of having determination, drive, & persistence, and not allowing customs or traditions to define one's boundaries. Alternatively stated, it's an "object lesson" of the importance of not being captive to the environment one is born into. In another sense, Lillian did what came naturally - she was internally driven to reach for the next rung in the ladder that her dreams unfolded before her. No doubt, her Christian roots/foundations, faith, & the Bible, were her silent enforcers that refused to allow her to stagger, along with the early recognition that the skill-sets provided by a high school diploma or a BS degree wouldn't open up for her significant breakthroughs that she perceived possible. Having studied the life of Joshua in Sunday School didn't hurt, neither did moving in the flow of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's.

    Many of us of her generation and culture can readily identify with her path; likewise, many of the next generation would surely benefit from an in-depth study of it. In short, her fruit reflects the rewards from hard work, risk taking, maintaining relationships & adhering to the counsel & advice of trusted associates, along with owning up to the potential that others saw in her. She should be congratulated for pursuing her predestination for greatness because many of us start the trail but few pursue to the end. Like a rolling stone, she kept on rolling toward the next potential, trusting God to see her through it all. I highly recommend this book for today's youth who don't see doors of opportunities on the horizon of their future.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 12, 2010

    Inspiring

    An inspiring memoir that eloquently conveys the results of prepartion, determination, and collaboration for success...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Motivating!

    Well written and engaging. Lambert's personal story of her experiences during her travels on "the road to someplace better" is awe-inspiring. As a current MBA student and an African American woman, I was interested to read about the obstacles that she encountered and impressed at how she persevered and overcame. Her story shows me that I should dream "bigger" and expect to achieve more. Lillian Lambert is living proof that it can be done! My 15 year old daughter will be reading this next!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)