Roadshow: Landscape with Drums: A Concert Tour by Motorcycle [NOOK Book]

Overview



For thirty years, drummer, author, and songwriter Neil Peart had wanted to write a book about “the biggest journey of all in my restless existence: the life of a touring musician.” Finally, the right time, and the right tour . . .
In the summer of 2004, after three decades, twenty gold albums, and thousands of performances spanning four continents, the band Rush embarked on a celebratory 30th Anniversary World Tour. The “R30” tour traveled to nine countries, where the band ...
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Roadshow: Landscape with Drums: A Concert Tour by Motorcycle

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Overview



For thirty years, drummer, author, and songwriter Neil Peart had wanted to write a book about “the biggest journey of all in my restless existence: the life of a touring musician.” Finally, the right time, and the right tour . . .
In the summer of 2004, after three decades, twenty gold albums, and thousands of performances spanning four continents, the band Rush embarked on a celebratory 30th Anniversary World Tour. The “R30” tour traveled to nine countries, where the band performed fifty-seven shows in front of more than half a million fans. Uniquely, Peart chose to do his between-show traveling by motorcycle, riding 21,000 miles of back roads and highways in North America and Europe—from Appalachian hamlets and Western deserts to Scottish castles and Alpine passes.
Roadshow illuminates the daunting rigors of a major international concert tour, as well as Peart's exploration of the scenic byways and country towns along the way. His evocative and entertaining prose carries the reader through every performance and every journey, sharing the bittersweet reflections triggered by the endlessly unfolding landscape. Observations and reflections range from the poignantly, achingly personal to the wickedly irreverent.
Part behind-the-scenes memoir, part existential travelogue, Roadshow winds through nineteen countries on both sides of the Atlantic, in search of the perfect show, the perfect meal, the perfect road, and an elusive inner satisfaction that comes only with the recognition that the journey itself is the ultimate destination.
The inner workings of the tour, the people Peart works with and the people he meets, the roads and stages and ever-changing scenery—all flow into an irresistible story.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781770901391
  • Publisher: ECW Press
  • Publication date: 5/30/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 337,252
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author



Neil Peart is an internationally critically acclaimed, bestselling, and award-nominated author, and for more than thirty years has been the legendary drummer and lyricist for Rush, the most successful band in the history of Canadian rock music. Defying categorization, his books have earned a devoted readership by combining elements of memoir, travel writing, and social commentary with a thoughtful, musical sense of self-discovery.
His previous books include Traveling Music: The Soundtrack to My Life and Times (2004), a unique triple memoir of a man, a musician, and a traveler; The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa (1996), a richly textured account of bicycle touring in “the continent where both life and art began;” and the relentlessly soul searching Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road (2002), which was chosen by The Writers' Trust of Canada as a Drainie-Taylor Biography Prize Finalist for its “exceptional merit” as one of the five best biographies of the year.
For their achievements, Peart and his Rush bandmates have received the Order of Canada, the country's highest civilian honor.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 12, 2013

    Great Inside look at a Rush tour & other things

    Roadshow was an engaging look at the R30 tour of the group Rush from the drummer Neil Peart's viewpoint. His travels between shows on his motorcycle are the meat of the story but he also reveals little bits of trivia about his band mates and interesting literary quotes sprinkled in here and there.

    I would have given it a higher rating but I was a bit irritated with Peart's constant complaining over trivial things and his tendency to be very judgmental about people at times. He doesn't seem to realize that his wealth makes his complaints seem petty to those of us who don't make as much money. Yes he works hard for that money but does he really not like the fans that much?

    I am attending the Clockwork Angels tour this summer to enjoy their music, yet after reading this book I wonder how much longer Peart wants to go on tour. I do love the band and their music and it was worth reading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2008

    A reviewer

    This is the latest installment of Neil Peart¿s books that catalogue not only his physical journey across the landscape, but also a personal journey into his thoughts, memories, and feelings. For fans of his previous books 'The Masked Rider, Ghost Rider, and Traveling Music', this book shows an increasingly tight stylistic development. There is less time spent on wandering themes or the inclusion of letters from Peart to his friends 'as there was in Ghost Rider'. Instead, Peart deftly sections the book into two different themes. Again, Peart describes his motorcycle journeys between concert stops¿this time on Rush¿s R30 World Tour in North America and Europe. While once again the primary vehicle for Peart¿s details are his motorcycle, less time is spent calculating the actual mileage and routes as was seen in his previous books. His attention now turns towards the people and the challenges of traveling across the globe, all while trying to get as many ¿passport stamps¿ from different national parks as he can. He constantly refers to the problems caused by his GPS unit 'that he nicknamed Doofus' at getting his traveling partner and him around the back roads. Peart gives extra time to capturing glimpses of the variety of lifestyles. Perhaps one of the most poignant examples is a contrast that Peart describes between two very different experiences. He describes driving through Czechoslovakian border towns where he notes what he calls the ¿darker side of the fall of Communism¿ as evidenced by the brothels that populate the roadside. This is a stark difference to his description of Skibo Castle and the Carnegie Club in Scotland, where he stayed two nights at a posh hotel complete with its own private library, scotch tastings, and gourmet dinners. The reader comes away from Peart¿s many descriptions not only with a sense of what he has seen, but also knowing that it has also been retold by someone with a keen sense of observation and a passion for translating that ability into the written word. The second theme of the book focuses mostly on the nuances of touring. Peart writes at length about his traveling arrangements, the pressures of friends and family on the road, and the routine of preparing to play night after night. He describes his feelings from each show, noting how well he thinks it went based on his satisfaction by how he feels in the tour bus after the show. With each stop, Peart throws a little jab at the big business of rock concerts. Never once does he actually call the venue by its name instead, he refers to the area by a clever nickname meant to expose the greed of mega-corporations as venue sponsors 'for example, instead of calling the arena the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater, he calls it the ¿Cellular Telephone Network Amphitheater¿'. Never at any time do the details become repetitive or mundane Peart varies them enough to keep the reader interested. With each stop on the tour, Peart reveals another aspect of life as a successful working musician 'some of them are quirky like when a mysterious fan left him a bottle of his favorite scotch outside his hotel room, and some of them are more serious like when a determined fan showed up on his tour bus after a concert without being invited'. Anyone who wants a complete look inside the touring life of one of rock music¿s most talented and well-respected musicians should read this book. Not only do you learn about what it takes to be a successful musician, but Peart teaches you about the fascinating people he has met and the places he has been.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2007

    Well written, though much negativity

    It's a sad shame that such a talented writer and musician spends more time complaining and being negative than documenting 'adventures' like in his first 2 books. It's also disappointing that the title misleads potential purchasers that the book is about being on a concert tour, though actual concert stories are minimal. Furthermore, his aversion to fame, noted repeatedly, is contradicted by his drooling over celebrities he meets in the story. Enjoy Rush's music, as hopefully that will continue to inspire instead of nauseate. Question : to whom does an atheist pray for a good show?

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2011

    Drummer to travel guide

    Truly enjoyed the book. I have read all of Neil's book. This is my favorite. Neil thanks for sharing the music,travel and red apples. Cheers !

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2007

    Enjoyable on every level...

    ...although I may be a bit biased. I am a drummer and avid motorcyclist myself. Mind you, I have not enjoyed either activity to the lengths that Neil has. Unlike the other reviewer, I do not believe that this book is rife with negativity. Neil writes directly from the heart, and inevitably at times, negative emotions will flow. I believe Neil writes more for himself than for anyone else. Sort of his own form of therapy. He obviously doesn't need to sell books, as the success of Rush has long ago cemented his financial future. I believe he simply wants to share his adventures honestly through his own eyes for those that may be interested. If Neil were to set out on this type of journey and write specifically what he thought people would like to read, then it would not come across as genuine emotion. Thankfully, he sticks to writing directly from the gut, which I find quite refreshing in a day and age where so much of what is created seems so contrived and redundant. I found the book interesting, amusing, thought provoking, and inspiring. I believe, as with anything really, that this is all relative of course. Someone who is really into music, perhaps a musician themselves, and has some understanding or experience traveling by motorcycle will most likely enjoy this book the more than others. One final note- Most modern definitions of prayer include a description of prayer as being a plea/comment to a non-specific deity. There are many people who would consider themselves spiritual, without claiming a specific denomination. Many people simply pray to themselves as a motivational lift. Prayer does not have to mean that one is attempting to communicate with a God, so to speak.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2011

    I read it for a school project!!!!<3

    In school we had to pick an interesting famous person to present to the class. I chose Neil Peart because I am in love with the band rush. I bought this book and others writen by him but i liked this one the best. I finished the book about four days after buying it. The quickest I have ever read a book. It really was great and I do recomend it to anyone who loves thee band and drummer as much as I do. :P

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    Posted April 9, 2013

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    Posted December 1, 2010

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    Posted October 24, 2008

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    Posted April 18, 2012

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    Posted October 1, 2010

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