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Roadside Geology of New Jersey
     

Roadside Geology of New Jersey

5.0 2
by David P. Harper
 

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This absorbing book opens with an overview of the state's geologic history and proceeds with 13 road guides that unearth the stories behind the state's rocks, sediments, and minerals. More than just a guide, Roadside Geology of New Jersey is chock full of insightful discussions on such timely topics as sea level rise and climate change. Get the scoop on why so much

Overview

This absorbing book opens with an overview of the state's geologic history and proceeds with 13 road guides that unearth the stories behind the state's rocks, sediments, and minerals. More than just a guide, Roadside Geology of New Jersey is chock full of insightful discussions on such timely topics as sea level rise and climate change. Get the scoop on why so much sand moves during superstorms such as Hurricane Sandy, and learn about more than a century of efforts to stabilize the beaches along the Jersey Shore. New Jersey was bisected in 1664, when a boundary line was drawn from Little Egg Harbor to the Delaware River near the Water Gap so that this earth of majesty, this fortress built by Nature for herself, could be deeded by the Duke of York to Lord Berkeley and George Carteret. If you travel that line-the surveyors' pylons still stand-you traverse the physiographic provinces of New Jersey. You cross the Coastal Plain. You cross the Triassic Lowlands, a successor basin. You cross the Blue Ridge, crystalline hills. Now before you is the centerpiece of a limestone valley that runs south from New Jersey to Alabama and north from New Jersey into Canada-one valley, known to science as the Great Valley of the Appalachians and to local peoples here and there as Champlain, Shenandoah, Clinch River Valley, but in New Jersey by no special name, for in terrain so cornucopian one does not tend to notice a Shenandoah. A limestone valley is a white silo, a white barn, a sweep of ground so beautiful it should never end. You cross the broad valley. You rise now into the folded-and-faulted mountains, the eastern sinuous welt, the deformed Appalachians themselves. You are still in New Jersey.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780878426003
Publisher:
Mountain Press Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
04/15/2013
Series:
Roadside Geology
Pages:
345
Sales rank:
613,854
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.50(d)

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Roadside Geology of New Jersey 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is ideal for both the specialist and general reader. It provides a marvelous understanding of the changes in New Jersey's landscape since the earth was formed, and helps you interpret what you see today.
leopardiNJ More than 1 year ago
Roadside Geology of New Jersey is the latest and among the best in a series of Guides that is now over 1/2-century old and covers more than half of the continental United States. Written by David P. Harper formerly of the New Jersey Geological Survey, New Jersey Site Remediation Program, and past president of the New Jersey Geological Association, this guide, like others in the series, is meant to be both accessible to amateur science sleuths and yet rigorous and accurate in presentation of geologic fact. Roadside Geology of New Jersey fully measures up to both expectations. Of particular merit in this volume is the outstanding quality of the individual "day-trips" - road guides, somewhat overlapping, of which there are more than a dozen. Almost all illustrations and figures are in color and all of the text is printed on durable paper stock. Although, inevitably, one might take umbrage at specific omissions (or perhaps inappropriate emphasis) in a text of this type, the author has clearly strived for a balance between breadth and depth and has hit most of the State's geologic high points. Roadside Geology of New Jersey includes an adequate, if brief, section of geologic fundamentals, a glossary, references and an index. It might have been better to omit the glossary and, instead insure that less-well-known terminology be explained in place as it was used. Also some of the author's explanations are a bit obscure and could have benefitted from more thorough editing. In addition the book fails to include any text tying the opening page overall New Jersey geologic map to the individual road guides. On the whole, Roadside Geology of New Jersey does this fascinating State geology proud. Richard R. Pardi Environmental Science William Paterson University