Robinson Crusoe: The Complete Story of Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe: The Complete Story of Robinson Crusoe

3.6 151
by Daniel Defoe

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For more than 270 years, readers everywhere have been fascinated by the young fool who ran away from wealth, security, and family for a rough life at sea -- and came to his senses too late, alone on a tropical island. Alone except for cannibals, that is, and God. Robinson Crusoe's adventure takes place on a remote island. Adjusting to the primitive conditions, he…  See more details below


For more than 270 years, readers everywhere have been fascinated by the young fool who ran away from wealth, security, and family for a rough life at sea -- and came to his senses too late, alone on a tropical island. Alone except for cannibals, that is, and God. Robinson Crusoe's adventure takes place on a remote island. Adjusting to the primitive conditions, he learns to make tools, shelters, bread, and clothes. More importantly, he becomes a Christian.

Product Details

Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
Oxford World's Classics Hardcovers Series
Product dimensions:
4.30(w) x 6.40(h) x 0.70(d)

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I was born in the Year 1632, in the City of York, of a good Family, tho not of that Country, my Father being a Foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull: He got a good Estate by Merchandise, and leaving off his Trade, lived afterward at York, from whence he had married my Mother, whose Relations were named Robinson, a very good Family in that Country, and from whom I was called Robinson Kreutznaer; but by the usual Corruption of Words in England, we are now called, nay we call our selves, and write our Name Crusoe, and so my Companions always call’d me.

I had two elder Brothers, one of which was Lieutenant Collonel to an English Regiment of Foot in Flanders, formerly commanded by the famous Coll. Lockhart, and was killed at the Battle near Dunkirk against the Spaniards: What became of my second Brother I never knew any more than my Father or Mother did know what was become of me.

Being the third Son of the Family, and not bred to any Trade, my Head began to be fill’d very early with rambling Thoughts: My Father, who was very ancient, had given me a competent Share of Learning, as far as House-Education, and a Country Free-School generally goes, and design’d me for the Law; but I would be satisfied with nothing but going to Sea, and my Inclination to this led me so strongly against the Will, nay the Commands of my Father, and against all the Entreaties and Perswasions of my Mother and other Friends, that there seem’d to be something fatal in that Propension of Nature tending directly to the Life of Misery which was to be-fal me.

My Father, a wise and grave Man, gave me serious and excellent Counsel against what he foresaw was my Design. Hecall’d me one Morning into his Chamber, where he was confined by the Gout, and expostulated very warmly with me upon this Subject: He ask’d me what Reasons more than a meer wandring Inclination I had for leaving my Father’s House and my native Country, where I might be well introduced, and had a Prospect of raising my Fortunes by Application and Industry, with a Life of Ease and Pleasure. He told me it was for Men of desperate Fortunes on one Hand, or of aspiring, superior Fortunes on the other, who went abroad upon Adventures, to rise by Enterprize, and make themselves famous in Undertakings of a Nature out of the common Road; that these things were all either too far above me, or too far below me; that mine was the middle State, or what might be called the upper Station of Low Life, which he had found by long Experience was the best State in the World, the most suited to human Happiness, not exposed to the Miseries and Hardships, the Labour and Sufferings of the mechanick Part of Mankind, and not embarass’d with the Pride, Luxury, Ambition and Envy of the upper Part of Mankind. He told me, I might judge of the Happiness of this State, by this one thing, viz. That this was the State of Life which all other People envied, that Kings have frequently lamented the miserable Consequences of being born to great things, and wish’d they had been placed in the Middle of the two Extremes, between the Mean and the Great; that the wise Man gave his Testimony to this as the just Standard of true Felicity, when he prayed to have neither Poverty or Riches.

He bid me observe it, and I should always find, that the Calamities of Life were shared among the upper and lower Part of Mankind; but that the middle Station had the fewest Disasters, and was not expos’d to so many Vicissitudes as the higher or lower Part of Mankind; nay, they were not subjected to so many Distempers and Uneasinesses either of Body or Mind, as those were who, by vi-cious Living, Luxury and Extravagancies on one Hand, or by hard Labour, Want of Necessaries, and mean or insufficient Diet on the other Hand, bring Distempers upon themselves by the natural Consequences of their Way of Living; That the middle Station of Life was calculated for all kind of Vertues and all kinds of Enjoyments; that Peace and Plenty were the Hand-maids of a middle Fortune; that Temperance, Moderation, Quietness, Health, Society, all agreeable Diversions, and all desirable Pleasures, were the Blessings attending the middle Station of Life; that this Way Men went silently and smoothly thro’ the World, and comfortably out of it, not embarass’d with the Labours of the Hands or of the Head, not sold to the Life of Slavery for daily Bread, or harrast with perplex’d Circumstances, which rob the Soul of Peace, and the Body of Rest; not enrag’d with the Passion of Envy, or secret burning Lust of Ambition for great things; but in easy Circumstances sliding gently thro the World, and sensibly tasting the Sweets of living, without the bitter, feeling that they are happy, and learning by every Day’s Experience to know it more sensibly.

After this, he press’d me earnestly, and in the most affectionate manner, not to play the young Man, not to precipitate my self into Miseries which Nature and the Station of Life I was born in, seem’d to have provided against; that I was under no Necessity of seeking my Bread; that he would do well for me, and endeavour to enter me fairly into the Station of Life which he had been just recommending to me; and that if I was not very easy and happy in the World, it must be my meer Fate or Fault that must hinder it, and that he should have nothing to answer for, having thus discharg’d his Duty in warning me against Measures which he knew would be to my Hurt: In a word, that as he would do very kind things for me if I would stay and settle at Home as he directed, so he would not have so much Hand in my Misfortunes, as to give me any Encouragement to go away: And to close all, he told me I had my elder Brother for an Example, to whom he had used the same earnest Perswasions to keep him from going into the Low Country Wars, but could not prevail, his young Desires prompting him to run into the Army where he was kill’d; and tho’ he said he would not cease to pray for me, yet he would venture to say to me, that if I did take this foolish Step, God would not bless me, and I would have Leisure hereafter to reflect upon having neglected his Counsel when there might be none to assist in my Recovery.

I observed in this last Part of his Discourse, which was truly Prophetick, tho’ I suppose my Father did not know it to be so himself; I say, I observed the Tears run down his Face very plentifully, and especially when he spoke of my Brother who was kill’d; and that when he spoke of my having Leisure to repent, and none to assist me, he was so mov’d, that he broke off the Discourse, and told me, his Heart was so full he could say no more to me.

I was sincerely affected with this Discourse, as indeed who could be otherwise; and I resolv’d not to think of going abroad any more, but to settle at home according to my Father’s Desire. But alas! a few Days wore it all off; and in short, to prevent any of my Father’s farther Importunities, in a few Weeks after, I resolv’d to run quite away from him. However, I did not act so hastily neither as my first Heat of Resolution prompted, but I took my Mother, at a time when I thought her a little pleasanter than ordinary, and told her, that my Thoughts were so entirely bent upon seeing the World, that I should never settle to any thing with Resolution enough to go through with it, and my Father had better give me his Consent than force me to go without it; that I was now Eighteen Years old, which was too late to go Apprentice to a Trade, or Clerk to an Attorney; that I was sure if I did, I should never serve out my time, and I should certainly run away from my Master before my Time was out, and go to Sea; and if she would speak to my Father to let me go but one Voyage abroad, if I came home again and did not like it, I would go no more, and I would promise by a double Diligence to recover that Time I had lost.

From the Paperback edition.

Copyright 2001 by Daniel Defoe

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Robinson Crusoe 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 151 reviews.
3lewisFE More than 1 year ago
Ever since Robinson Crusoe left his father against his blessing things haven't really gone well for him. After many voyages, and becoming a slave, freeing himself from said slavery, he ends up on a deserted island where he is the only man to survive the voyage. His resolve to live proves to be a strong force and he is determined to live the best he can on the island, and this is where the story truly begins¿

The book war originally published in 1719, but the impact of the brilliant writing still shows today. Daniel Defoe always provides awesome description that makes the reader feel like he is right their next to Robinson Crusoe experiencing the events alongside him. Crusoe himself is a very lively character as well. It seems that almost everything he does ends with a negative consequence. These events truly impact Crusoe, later in the story he starts thanking god, and taking truly believing in the almighty. The Robinson Crusoe in the beginning of the story is not the same Robison Crusoe at the end of the story.

Robinson Crusoe is journey that you will want to embark on. Every chapter holds excitement, adventure, and a touch of wit. If you haven¿t read this story I highly recommend it as it goes above and beyond the quality required to make this a truly acceptable story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The page breaks come in the bottom third of every page, and long strings of nonsense are present throughout. Don't waste your time with this copy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Daniel Defoe is great writer. To those of you who complain about the book being slow and overly descriptive, the narrator's voice in Robinson Crusoe is slow and descriptive on purpose. It makes the story drag and feel long and you grow tired of it, just like Robinson Crusoe would have felt being stranded on an island, away from family and friends, having to work extremely hard just to survive. It makes you feel his pain. With the description, you see everything vividly, almost as if you were there. To those of you who complained that it needs to be rewritten in words you can understand, may I suggest changing your perspective. Perhaps all that is needed is for you to expand your vocabulary instead of dumbing down beatiful literature because you don't understand a few words. Back then children had bigger vocabularies than adults do today. Challenge your mind. Not all good books are page turners.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I find it very annoying to see other kids my age and older saying this piece to be boring. I think they are being a little immature and need to get over it. This book was required in my 6th Grade Gifted Comm. Arts curriculum. I found it very hard in the beginning. I was not used to that old English type of writing at all, and I usually sticked to books with colorful themes and lots of characters, like the Harry Potter series or Garth Nix's Abhorsen trilogy, and always books of fantasy. This book was of isolation and reality. There were many lessons to be learnt and hardships to be had. I think this book will be wonderful and a good experience for generations to come.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book and a good challege,I definitly recomend
Guest More than 1 year ago
Read this novel for the first time last week and decided to share my thoughts on it with y'all. What are we in 2007 to make of this tale of a shipwrecked survivor, written a century before Queen Victoria was born? Many of us today seem to like the idea of escaping from it all, and, indeed, many reality TV shows of recent years have taken such a theme. However, would the reality prove remotely like the fantasy? I see Crusoe as a precursor to science fiction, although I am being careful not to read into the novel my viewpoint of three centuries' hindsight. Nonetheless, many of the themes of sci fi are present, in that, through unforeseen circumstances, a man finds himself in an environment which is alien to him and learns to begin afresh, almost as a new Adam. He encounters people from cultures very different to his own, and contends with the elements and the limitations imposed on him by fate, along with his own conscience as a result of his moral choices and his belief in God's providence. Of course, many of these themes are far, far older than Defoe's time, drawing heavily on the Biblical books of Genesis, Job and Jonah. But heavy stuff aside, Crusoe is also a rollicking good read, a classic island adventure story, and on which I would heartily recommend to everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿Robinson Crusoe¿ by Daniel Defoe is fantastic adventure. The book is about a man¿s, Crusoe, adventures around the world. He experiences many ups and downs as he visits many places throughout the world. Marooned on an island, he survives the elements as well as cannibals. He truly is king of his island. He escapes his island and gets back to the civilized world. He finds that most of his family has died, except for two of his sisters. He does not go adventuring anymore. He finds a wife, who dies soon after. He lives a very adventurous life. ¿Robinson Crusoe¿ is a very well written book. In it Defoe does an awesome job of keeping the reader hooked with a suspenseful plot and characters that intrigue the imagination. Throughout the book Defoe also keeps a distinct theme of life being unpredictable. In the book Crusoe is always getting into situations that he does not expect to get into. He is kidnapped, becomes a wealthy plantation owner, is marooned on an island, and even gets married. ¿Robinson Crusoe¿ is a great adventure novel that will keep anyone reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dont read this book, it doesnt really go anywhere. He spends chapters describing how he feels, not how he survives.
nookcolor7 More than 1 year ago
the book has a good price and you can read it when you dont have any thing else to read
Charles Jaskolski More than 1 year ago
this book was the best ive ever read with so.many twists and turns
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is a movement in America by anti-Christian bigots to remove all references to Chritianity and Jesus by the ACLU and others who consider Jesus to be ANOTHER GOD, not the SON of God. When Crusoe finds God and becomes a Chritian this book has become in effect a target for social banning by anti-Christian bigots.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book dragged a lot with overly descriptive passages, repetition, and very strong religious overtones. Definitely not a page turner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I also love this book
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can understand if any of you get bored with this book, but it is actually pretty good. It was written during 1719 so that was the normal way of speaking.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pyou must have some pretty strong guts to be posting something telling people all over the united states that yu are a grown man. Most of us are young children who either got a nook for a present from someone or bought it with their own money. I bought my own nook. Once you read this book tell me how good it is.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago