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Robot Zombie Frankenstein!
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Robot Zombie Frankenstein!

5.0 3
by Annette Simon
 
Perfect for high-energy story times, this cumulative tale is a madcap mash-up featuring robots, shapes in motley amalgamation, and . . . pie!

Squares, rectangles, ovals, triangles, and other colorful shapes are sorted and arranged into — two robots! But why stop there? Shape by shape, costume by costume, Robot and Robot play a game of oneupmanship that

Overview

Perfect for high-energy story times, this cumulative tale is a madcap mash-up featuring robots, shapes in motley amalgamation, and . . . pie!

Squares, rectangles, ovals, triangles, and other colorful shapes are sorted and arranged into — two robots! But why stop there? Shape by shape, costume by costume, Robot and Robot play a game of oneupmanship that zips, zooms, and whirrs from friendly to hilariously out of control in nanoseconds. Robot Zombie? How about Robot Zombie Frankenstein? Can you handle Robot Zombie Frankenstein Pirate? What could be next? Where will it all stop? When the race makes a surprise (and delicious) turn, Robot and Robot are happy to be plain old robots — and buddies — once again.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In Simon’s Mocking Birdies (Simply Read, 2005), two singing birds faced off against each other. In this outing, Simon uses brightly colored shapes, substantial creativity, and a photograph of cherry pie to construct a story of robotic one-upmanship. In the opening scene, two robots—one magenta, the other green with an orange necktie—stare at readers from against a white backdrop and introduce themselves: “Robot.” “Robot.” The green bot dashes off and returns as a “Robot Zombie!” (a chunk of its head is missing, ovals of red “blood” drip from its mouth), and the other promptly tops its adversary with a “robot zombie Frankenstein” costume, which adds a forehead scar, spiky toupee, and neck bolts. Matters escalate. “Robot zombie Frankenstein pirate superhero-in-disguise outer space invader CHEF!” the robots shout, barreling toward each other. The cumulative chaos of the robots’ costumes stands in humorous contrast to Simon’s narrative and visual discipline, as she pokes fun at the human desire to be #1 and acknowledges the “Where did that come from?” nature of in-the-moment creativity. Ages 4–8. Agent: Brenda Bowen, Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
A highly entertaining method of introducing a concept... Simon tells a simple, humorous tale of two robots and their imaginative play and quick costume changes... This hilarious title works for one-on-one sharing as participants can discuss the many different shapes shown, and in a group setting where children will laugh at the rivalry of the two mechanical characters. Great fun!
—School Library Journal

Simon uses brightly colored shapes, substantial creativity, and a photograph of cherry pie to construct a story of robotic one-upmanship... The cumulative chaos of the robots’ costumes stands in humorous contrast to Simon’s narrative and visual discipline, as she pokes fun at the human desire to be #1 and acknowledges the "Where did that come from?" nature of in-the-moment creativity.
—Publishers Weekly

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
This is as much a make-your-own-robot challenge as it is a story. The end pages display a wide variety of labeled geometric shapes in different colors, all the parts needed to produce the robot images inside. Then the fun begins, as the large pages show first two robots. Confronting a robot zombie made from some of the pieces, on the next page one robot becomes a "Frankenstein" (in huge black letters) made from other pieces. "Recompute" leads the other robot to another transformation to a PIRATE. Then back and forth they go, to superhero-in-disguise, outer space invader, and finally as the transformed robots confront each other across a double page, CHEF! Since he is complete "...with pie" and "...with fork," the robots become "buddies." The flat, digitally created illustrations are joined at this point by a photographed pie and fork; the argument becomes an eating event. The robots agree that the pie is, "Mmm..." The text is minimal fun. Although not suggested by the author, copying the collection of parts shown on the end pages in order to design personal robots seems a reasonable follow-up activity. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-K—This highly entertaining method of introducing a concept begins and ends with brightly colored, digitally created shapes pictured and labeled on the endpapers; close examination reveals differences in the named pieces from front to back pages. Simon tells a simple, humorous tale of two robots and their imaginative play and quick costume changes. At the start, the two figures stand next to each other and declare themselves to be "Robot. Robot." However, the green one dashes off the page and returns as a "Robot ZOMBIE!" He has added rectangular "tatters" to his clothing, a rectangular hot pink "brain" to a square dent in his head, and red oval blood dripping from his mouth. His hand is lying on the floor behind him. The other robot doesn't want to be outdone, so he mutters, "Yikes. Robot reboot…" and becomes "Robot Zombie Frankenstein!" As the bots one-up one another, the competition gets fierce until the two finally declare a truce when a pie and a fork appear. This hilarious title works for one-on-one sharing as participants can discuss the many different shapes shown, and in a group setting where children will laugh at the rivalry of the two mechanical characters. Great fun!—Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews
Competitive pals get into a war of escalating ridiculousness in this amusing if visually stunted tale. Two robots introduce themselves to readers, then one zips away and back to reintroduce itself as "Robot ZOMBIE!" Not to be outdone, its companion dons a costume of its own, now appearing as "Robot Zombie Frankenstein!" And up the ante goes. With each change, the robots pile on more and more visual elements (a Frankenstein scar, Groucho glasses, etc.). When the robots both appear as "Robot zombie Frankenstein pirate superhero-in-disguise outer space invader chef," one robot produces a tasty cherry pie and the two dig in, rivalry forgotten and buddies once more. The endpapers display the full roster of shapes that make up each costume. While the effect is novel and the chaos sure to prove hilarious to young readers, there is something oddly static about the digital art itself. In its attempt to simplify the visuals down to their most essential shapes, the story is drained of the vitality and charisma normally associated with Simon's work. Thanks to the use of shapes, this book may work best with craft programs more than anything else. Yet in an era in which electronics are always one-upping one another in the global market, it's nice to see a picture-book equivalent that ends with the consumption of delicious desserts. Apple and PC, take note. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763651244
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
04/24/2012
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
716,660
Product dimensions:
9.80(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Annette Simon was once a pie-loving advertising creative director who wrote and art-directed national print and TV campaigns. Now, she’s a pie-loving author-illustrator who creates picture books, and she blames this particular book on the trickiness of her little sister and the deliciousness of her grandma’s pies! Annette Simon lives in Florida.

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Robot Zombie Frankenstein! 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
This_Kid_Reviews_Books More than 1 year ago
Purple Robot and Green Robot are best friends. But then suddenly Green Robot leaves. Where has he gone? What is he doing? What is that over there? It looks like a zombie… a ROBOT ZOMBIE! Green Robot has changed to a Robot Zombie costume! But wait, Purple Robot is jealous, so he changes in to ROBOT ZOMBIE FRANKENSTEIN costume! Then Green Robot Zombie leaves to try to be better than Purple Robot Zombie Frankenstein. Who will turn out to be the best between the two friends or will they ever come to a compromise? This is a funny hilarious book about a battle of buddies! I like the uniqueness of the book and the repetition of words adding one more to the phrase before (ROBOT ZOMBIE FRANKENSTEIN PIRATE!). It makes it easy to read for young kids AND it’s funny! The story has a nice ending because the friends finally compromise (let’s just say there is pie involved). The illustrations really make the book awesome! They are simple shapes just put together in different ways. **Note I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Smile right along with your child as you both enjoy this entertaining romp. Two geometrically inspired, brightly colored robots compete to see who can come up with the best costume, and eventually decide there's something even better than being the best. Pie. Simon has the amazing gift of delightfully surprising the reader with each page turn. From verbal creativity in her robot language, hilarious costume changes, and even the visual surprise of a photograph after all those glorious, disarmingly simple spreads, this is a book you won't mind reading again and again. There's great opportunity to come up with your own silly games as you and your audience, whether one child or a room full of kiddos, see how creative you can get. Books that inspires creativity like this one does are five-star gold mines. No, six star treasure troves. No, billion star galaxy wonders. And so it goes . . .
colbysharp More than 1 year ago
My son is a fan of robot books. When I received a review copy of Robot Zombie Frankenstein! I was super excited to see what he thought. I pictured us sitting down on the couch and reading the book together. I was wrong. I showed him the book and he quickly snatched it out of my hands and took it upstairs to his room. “Um..Breslin? Do you want me to read you the new robot book?” No response. “Breslin?” “No thanks, Dad. I’m going to read this book by myself.” 15 minutes later I walk upstairs and say, “Hey Bres-”. “Dad, I’m sorry, but I’m busy reading this book right now.” A little while later it was bedtime. “Okay, Breslin it’s time to go to bed.” “Dad, do you want to read Robot Zombie Frankenstein!, it’s really awesome,” Breslin said. Talk about a smart kid. He totally played me. He knew that I was dying to read the book, and now he had me right where he wanted me: 10 extra minutes before he had to go to bed. I sat down with my son and Robot Zombie Frankenstein! We spent 15 minutes reading the book, but we never even got to the 32 pages in the middle. You see, Robot Zombie Frankenstein! has one of the coolest inside front and back covers that I have ever seen. On the inside cover you find an array of colorful shapes from the robots inside the book. The shapes are labeled things like: oval, rectangle, line. The back cover has the same shapes, but this time they are labeled the names of the robot parts: eyeball, robot arm, and speediness. After Breslin went to bed, I snuck into his room and snatched the book. I sat down, by myself, and found that the story was as good as the inside covers.