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Robots!: Draw Your Own Androids, Cyborgs & Fighting Bots
     

Robots!: Draw Your Own Androids, Cyborgs & Fighting Bots

by Jay Stephens
 
With an off-beat sense of humor that makes learning fun, Jay Stephens shows kids how to draw a wide range of marvelous mechanical creatures complete with hardwired heads, bionic bodies, and lots of electrical extras. Budding cartoonists will be pleased to meet and illustrate such unique characters as Automa Tom, the cyborg Cyborella, Astralux, and Gokin 9. The design

Overview

With an off-beat sense of humor that makes learning fun, Jay Stephens shows kids how to draw a wide range of marvelous mechanical creatures complete with hardwired heads, bionic bodies, and lots of electrical extras. Budding cartoonists will be pleased to meet and illustrate such unique characters as Automa Tom, the cyborg Cyborella, Astralux, and Gokin 9. The design data Stephens wittily lays out include everything from wheels and transforming parts to jets, dials, levers, and weapon systems, all of which children can use to “build” their own creations. Kids get to decide whether their robots will have armor, be able to slide into small spaces, have the ability to shoot projectiles, or anything else their imaginations can dream up!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristin Harris
Robots are not new. People have been inventing mechanical beings for thousands of years. Talos was a robot from ancient Greek mythology. L. Frank Baum created the Tin Woodsman from the Wizard of Oz over a hundred years ago. There are many sources of inspiration when designing a robot, the most basic inspiration is the human body. Many things need to be considered; what will the head look like; how will it communicate; and how are the body parts connected to each other? After these decisions have been made, it is time to start building. Many different examples of body construction are shown to facilitate this process. Arms, legs, and joints present a variety of possible approaches in the construction of a robot. Numerous examples of robots are illustrated. The detailed drawings include the purpose of the robot and its special functions. Among the robots featured are Greasemonkey, Gokin 9, Astralux, and Copper. This is as much a colorful illustrated discussion about robot design as it is a primer for drawing robots. Reviewer: Kristin Harris

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781579909376
Publisher:
Lark Books NC
Publication date:
01/01/2008
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
6 Years

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