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The Robots of Dawn

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Overview

A millennium into the future two advances have altered the course of human history: the colonization of the Galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain. Isaac Asimov's Robot novels chronicle the unlikely partnership between a New York City detective and a humanoid robot who must learn to work together.

Detective Elijah Baiey is called to the Spacer world Aurora to solve a bizarre case of roboticide. The prime suspect is a gifted roboticist who had the means, the motive, and ...

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The Robots of Dawn

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Overview

A millennium into the future two advances have altered the course of human history: the colonization of the Galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain. Isaac Asimov's Robot novels chronicle the unlikely partnership between a New York City detective and a humanoid robot who must learn to work together.

Detective Elijah Baiey is called to the Spacer world Aurora to solve a bizarre case of roboticide. The prime suspect is a gifted roboticist who had the means, the motive, and the opportunity to commit the crime. There's only one catch: Baley and his positronic partner, R. Daneel Olivaw, must prove the man innocent. For in a case of political intrigue and love between woman and robot gone tragically wrong, there's more at stake than simple justice. This time Baley's career, his life, and Earth's right to pioneer the Galaxy lie in the delicate balance. 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553299496
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/28/1994
  • Series: Robots Series , #3
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 79,016
  • Product dimensions: 6.86 (w) x 4.16 (h) x 1.19 (d)

Meet the Author

To list Isaac Asimov's honors, as to list his books, would be excessive. Let it simply be noted that Isaac Asimov was the most famous, most honored, most widely read, and most beloved science fiction author of all time. In his five decades as an author, he wrote more than four hundred books, won every award his readers and colleagues could contrive to give him, and provided pleasure and insight to millions. He died in 1992, still at work.

William Dufris have extensive experience on stage and screen.

Biography

To list Isaac Asimov's honors, as to list his books, would be excessive. Let it simply be noted that Isaac Asimov was the most famous, most honored, most widely read, and most beloved science fiction author of all time. In his five decades as an author, he wrote more than four hundred books, won every award his readers and colleagues could contrive to give him, and provided pleasure and insight to millions. He died in 1992, still at work.

Author biography courtesy of HarperCollins.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      January 20, 1920
    2. Place of Birth:
      Petrovichi, Russia
    1. Date of Death:
      April 6, 1992
    2. Place of Death:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      Columbia University, B.S. in chemistry, 1939; M.A. in chemistry, 1941; Ph.D. in biochemistry, 1948

Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 42 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(18)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2003

    A wonderful science fiction classic

    In 'The Robots of Dawn,' Asimov once again examines human nature through the devices of science fiction. The plot revolves around the 'murder' of one of two humaniform robots in existence, which protagonist Elijah Baley is called to the Spacer home world Aurora to investigate. Asimov's characters and plot are deep, and his understanding of human nature is truly remarkable. This book is not only a very engaging work of science fiction and mystery, but also a shrewd exposition of the motives and prejudices of human beings. And yet Asimov manages to provoke in his readers a strong sense of hope for the future of humankind

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2003

    My favorite of the Bailey-Olivaw series

    In my opinion, they should have ended the series with this book. ROBOTS AND EMPIRE was okay but not great. What I liked best about ROBOTS OF DAWN was the same aspect which made CAVES OF STEEL and THE NAKED SUN so appealing, and that was the partnership between Earthman Elijah Bailey and Auroran robot Daneel Olivaw. It is interesting to imagine a future where robots can be created that look, act and even feel in ways that humans can. Daneel Olivaw remains one of the most interesting characters conceived by Isaac Asimov. Truly and enjoyable work and very philosophical in theme.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2013

    Bloodshot

    Ugghhh nleh.

    1 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2003

    Robots Of Dawn

    I can see why the book The Robots Of Dawn by Isaac Moav, was a best seller. Placed on colony 13 of Mars in the year 3056 A.D. Earth or what¿s left of it is nothing more than a giant trash dump. That¿s the main reason most people like David Hannon moved to the beautiful colonies of mars. That¿s were he first met Elly Fenton. They both are in there early twenties and both are nearly opposites. This is one of the main conflicts they both have different views on the robots that do the work on colony 13 but they seem to have feelings for each other. Her father is one of the executives in the MAI (Mars Artificial Intelligence) Company and he is a detective trying to solve some unexplained murders in the colony. Unfortunately they soon discover an unforeseen glitch in the A.I. system, or was it seen earlier? Now that the robots are able to reprogram themselves another conflict arises man vs. machine. The characters are simplistic in the beginning but as the novel progresses there personalities become more clear and defined. The characters seem like very typical people, the girl is rich and can get away with a lot so she¿s spoiled, rude, and augmentative, that¿s what she¿s made out to be early on but later on we find out that she actually has feelings and cares for someone other than herself. The guy is witty, clever, and for the most part quiet and preserved, but he is not without his faults, he stays the same but you get a better idea of who he is during the book. The bit is a bit more simplistic than I would have liked, but it would be considered a somewhat complex story plot with complex developing characters and quite suspenseful book and over all I think it¿s a good book to read, and I recommend it to all sci-fi and mystery readers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    Vance

    I stroll in, my hands in my pockets, "Here?"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2014

    A scandalous murder has taken place. The victim? A life-like ro

    A scandalous murder has taken place. The victim? A life-like robot. The only possible culprit? His creator. As detective Elijah Baley might exclaim, “Jehoshaphat!” The Robots of Dawn is a science fiction mystery novel written by the esteemed writer Isaac Asimov. Originally published in 1983, it was intended to help retroactively bridge the gap between Asimov’s previous Robot, Empire, and Foundation series, most of which had been written and published in the 1950’s. The book features the recurring protagonist of the Robot series, Plainclothesman Elijah Baley, as well as his assistant, the robot R. Daneel Olivaw. It was nominated for the 1984 Hugo and Locus science fiction awards
    The Robots of Dawn takes place AD 4924, when humanity has settled nearly 50 other planets. This extensive settlement, however, has resulted in a clear dichotomy between the extraterrestrial human “Spacers” and the remaining “Earthmen. While the Spacers, their lifespans extended with advanced technology, feel superior to the Earthmen, the Earthmen hold equal antipathy for the Spacers, who they see as condescending and arrogant. Furthermore, while Spacer worlds have developed into utopias based on robotic labor, the Earth has become extremely overpopulated to the point that all humans live within massive, enclosed, and crowded Cities. Most Earthmen see robots as mere impersonal extensions over Spacer power and threats to their jobs. This results in a potent combination of robophobia and agoraphobia (fear of open places) which has completely prevented most Earthmen from exiting the Cities, and also forestalled the advancement of Earth culture and technology.
    However, a select few Earthmen, such as Elijah Baley, have begun to hold an interest in furthering Earth (or at least, human) civilization through expansion to unsettled systems. By this point in the Robot series, Baley is an established character: he is brave, sympathetic, and strongly devoted to duty, law, and propriety. He is a superb detective, thoroughly exploring all feasible (and often, infeasible) possibilities. However, he often jumps to conclusions and has difficulty relating to other cultures. Like most of his Earthly brethren, he is extremely agoraphobic. However, he is much more receptive than most to robots, having previously worked with the humaniform (advanced and human-like) R. Daneel Olivaw (the R standing for robot.
    This trusting relationship becomes extremely important, as Baley finds himself in a dangerous and unfamiliar situation: the Spacer planet Aurora. This planet has significantly more robots and fewer people than Earth. One of the planet’s roboticists, Dr. Hans Fastolfe, stands accused of “murdering” one of his creations: R. Jander Panell, one of only two humaniform robots in existence (the other being Daneel). Fastolfe’s political opponents argue that he has destroyed the robot in order to prevent further production of humaniforms, thereby preventing the automated colonization of new worlds as they had hoped. The task of proving Fastolfe’s innocence seems impossible, as Fastolfe has admitted that only he has the knowledge to disable Jander’s mind. After conducting a series of interviews, Baley determines that the only other person who would have the motive and knowledge to have disabled Jander’s mind is Chief Roboticist Amadiro, one of Fastolfe’s political opponents. Baley realizes that Jander’s destruction must have been related to Amadiro’s goal of accessing a humaniform mind, in order to study their workings (a secret held by Fastolfe). Baley confronts Amadiro with this accusation in front of the arbitrating Auroran Chairman, and is successful in proving Amadiro’s motive, leading him to confess his having had inquisitive conversations with Jander which may have led to his mental breakdown. Baley then forces Amadiro to agree to allow Aurorans and Earthmen to settle the Galaxy together, rather than an army of humaniform robots creating a thousand worlds identical to Aurora. Before leaving Aurora, Baley conducts one final interview with Giskard, another household robot, in order to prove his final suspicions. Incredibly, Giskard is revealed to have been inadvertently reprogrammed to comprehend brain activity as thoughts, enabling him to cause Jander’s death, an action he took to prevent Amadiro’s success in robotics and colonization. The novel closes with Giskard placing a mental block on Baley which will prevent him from revealing Giskard’s secrets, and then assuring Baley that Earth’s future is now secure.
    Having read the previous Robot books, as well as several other Asimov works, I found this book- especially the denouement- a delightful transition from the not-so-distant to the distant future. While neatly resolving the issues raised in the previous Robot books, it also sets the stage for the future of Earth- to be written of in the next book, Robots and Empire. Although the plot progressed in a very similar manner to the investigations of the previous books it was, as before, fascinating to see Baley’s reactions to new and unique situations. In addition, I enjoyed seeing how Asimov’s callbacks to his previous stories Liar! and The Positronic Man unfolded in importance to the story. These references helped demonstrate the significance of the book as a whole: bridging the gap between the past and future for Asimov’s fictional universe. While this was certainly the major focus of The Robots of Dawn, Asimov also manages to entertain with his tried-but-true writing formula, resulting in an excellent read for any who enjoy science fiction

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  • Posted May 12, 2013

    This is my favorite of the Robot Series. Great plot, good endin

    This is my favorite of the Robot Series. Great plot, good ending lots of techno things...would love to see this made into a movie.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Xavier to Echo/Chrissy

    Cloud/Ornirah's E-mail is mcmuffin12.@hotma.il.c.om She asked me to tell you.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2013

    Silvershot

    XD hi

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2013

    Transformers

    I may b on tonite. No promizes.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    Dart

    Loks around

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    BULLET TO ALL

    I am so sorry, but i must quit rp. I apolagize, but I wasn't allowed to rp in the first place. I hope you thrive.
    With a heavy heart,
    ~{•Silverbullet•}

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2013

    Ratchet

    Walked over. (Brb in about a hour or more...gotta clean -_-)

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2013


    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2013

    To All

    Next result

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2000

    Has to be one of Asimov's best

    You can read this one several times without losing any of the excitement. I believe that the Elijah Bailey series (Caves of Steel, The Naked Sun, Robots of Dawn, Robots and Empire and not to forget the short story Mirror Image) should be made into a movie series. These are exciting tales that are simply unforgettable.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews

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