Robur the Conqueror (Illustrated) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Robur the Conqueror is a science fiction novel by Jules Verne, published in 1886. It is also known as The Clipper of the Clouds. It has a sequel, The Master of the World, which was published in 1904.

Robur appears in Batman: Master of the Future, by Brian Augustyn and Eduardo Barreto, part of DC Comics' Elseworlds series. The story mixes a Victorian-era Batman, with the film...
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Robur the Conqueror (Illustrated)

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Overview

Robur the Conqueror is a science fiction novel by Jules Verne, published in 1886. It is also known as The Clipper of the Clouds. It has a sequel, The Master of the World, which was published in 1904.

Robur appears in Batman: Master of the Future, by Brian Augustyn and Eduardo Barreto, part of DC Comics' Elseworlds series. The story mixes a Victorian-era Batman, with the film Master of the World.

Robur is mentioned several times in the first three volumes of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, by Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill. He is first mentioned in Volume 1 corresponding with Captain Mors, a German fictional air-based character (Kapitan Mors, der LuftPirat - Captain Mors, the Sky Pirate). An entry in the supplementary The New Traveller's Almanac in the back of Volume 2 indicates that Robur is conscripted to lead Les Hommes Mysterieux ("The Mysterious Men"), which is a French analogue to the British team. Their fateful encounter with the League is detailed in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Black Dossier.

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On 9 March 1886, as Verne was coming home, his twenty-five-year-old nephew, Gaston, shot at him twice with a pistol. The first bullet missed, but the second one entered Verne's left leg, giving him a permanent limp that could not be overcome. This incident was hushed up in the media, but Gaston spent the rest of his life in a mental asylum. After the death of both his mother and Hetzel, Jules Verne began publishing darker works.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016242842
  • Publisher: BompaCrazy.com
  • Publication date: 3/17/2013
  • Series: The Extraordinary Voyages , #29
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,081,491
  • File size: 7 MB

Meet the Author

For some time, Verne's father pressed him to abandon his writing and begin a business as a lawyer, with Verne arguing in his letters that he could only find success in literature. The pressure to plan for a secure future in law reached its climax in January 1852, his father offered Verne his own Nantes law practice. Faced with this ultimatum, Verne decided conclusively to continue his literary life and refuse the job, writing "Am I not right to follow my own instincts? It's because I know who I am that I realize what I can be one day."

Go BompaCrazy!
In 1863, Verne had written a novel called Paris in the Twentieth Century about a young man who lives in a world of glass skyscrapers, high-speed trains, gas-powered automobiles, calculators, and a worldwide communications network, yet cannot find happiness and who comes to a tragic end. Hetzel thought the novel's pessimism would damage Verne's then-blossoming career, and suggested that he wait 20 years to publish it. Verne stored the manuscript in a safe, where it was discovered by his great-grandson in 1989. The long-lost novel was first published in 1994, and around the same time many other Verne novels and short stories were also published for the first time; these too are gradually appearing in English translations.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    I really liked this early sci-fi adventure novel from Verne. The

    I really liked this early sci-fi adventure novel from Verne. There is some fascinating technological stuff, and the adventure keeps you turning the page.

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