The Rockets' Red Glare: An Illustrated History of the War of 1812

Overview

This engagingly told and richly illustrated history invites readers to travel back in time and imagine what it would have been like to live through the War of 1812, America’s forgotten conflict.

Offering readers an impressive array of images—some rarely before seen—and a crisp narrative, the book recounts the war’s main battles and campaigns, from William Hull’s ignominious surrender at Detroit in 1812 to Andrew Jackson’s spectacular victory at New Orleans in 1815. Learn about ...

See more details below
Hardcover (20)
$33.83
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$39.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $13.14   
  • New (8) from $25.14   
  • Used (6) from $13.14   
Sending request ...

Overview

This engagingly told and richly illustrated history invites readers to travel back in time and imagine what it would have been like to live through the War of 1812, America’s forgotten conflict.

Offering readers an impressive array of images—some rarely before seen—and a crisp narrative, the book recounts the war’s main battles and campaigns, from William Hull’s ignominious surrender at Detroit in 1812 to Andrew Jackson’s spectacular victory at New Orleans in 1815. Learn about Oliver H. Perry’s remarkable victory on Lake Erie and the ensuing death of the great Shawnee leader Tecumseh. Witness the devastation on the Niagara Front as the balance of power shifted back and forth. Watch as Thomas Macdonough executes a masterstroke on Lake Champlain, winning a great naval battle and saving upper New York from occupation. Experience the demoralizing British raids in the Chesapeake that culminated in the burning of Washington, D.C., and the successful defense of Baltimore that inspired Francis Scott Key to pen "The Star-Spangled Banner."

The Rockets' Red Glare recaptures in vivid detail not only the military history of the war but also its domestic and diplomatic history. Authors Donald R. Hickey and Connie D. Clark show why the fragile young republic, which was still a second-rate power, declared war against Great Britain, an established global power. They also explain why Americans remember the conflict as an unalloyed success, even though by the war’s end, the United States faced military uncertainty, financial stress, a punishing British naval blockade, and the intractable opposition of Federalists in New England.

The thrilling stories and stunning illustrations of The Rockets' Red Glare are sure to capture the imagination of anyone interested in the fascinating history of the War of 1812.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
The Rockets' Red Glare is an excellent history... highly recommended.
The Past in Review
Well narrated and researched, this coffee table-sized book will be a welcome addition to the celebration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812.

— David Lee Poremba

Sea Classics
This is the one book that you'll definitely want to have and read!

— Blaine Taylor

Choice

Thereafter, Americans reveled in a new sense of nationalism, embraced bold confidence, and demonstrated a patriotic ability to construct a nation in their image. This outstanding book captures the stunning images of the war and that transformation. Highly recommended.

Naval History
This is an impressive and thoughtful work. Its imagery makes it an important addition to any collection focusing on the War of 1812; with its text and image combined, it is an excellent starting place for introducing Americans to the conflict.
Journal of America's Military Past
The authors give us numerous and absorbing gems such as this that make The Rockets' Red Glare.

— Richard V. Barbuto

Northern Marinerr/Le marin du nord
Well written and the time-line chronology found at the end of the book offers a good summary of the war's events.

— Louis Arthur Norton

The Lone Star Book Review

This is an excellent book filled with thrilling stories and stunning illustrations of The Rockets' Red Glare sure to capture the imagination of anyone interested in the fascinating history of the War of 1812

H-War, H-Net Reviews - Justin Dornbusch
This work is an excellent, well-rounded book suitable for a wide audience.
Barnes & Noble Review - Adam Kirsch
The War of 1812 has always been the Rodney Dangerfield of America's wars, doomed to get no historical respect... The Rockets' Red Glare... offers a perfect way to redress the balance. Sized for the coffee table and full of color reproductions of paintings and maps and broadsides, it also offers an accessible narrative of what may well have been America's least necessary war.
Sea Classics - Blaine Taylor
This is the one book that you'll definitely want to have and read!
The Past in Review - David Lee Poremba
Well narrated and researched, this coffee table-sized book will be a welcome addition to the celebration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812.
Journal of America's Military Past - Richard V. Barbuto
The authors give us numerous and absorbing gems such as this that make The Rockets' Red Glare.
Northern Marinerr/Le marin du nord - Louis Arthur Norton
Well written and the time-line chronology found at the end of the book offers a good summary of the war's events.
Lone Star Book Review
This is an excellent book filled with thrilling stories and stunning illustrations of The Rockets' Red Glare sure to capture the imagination of anyone interested in the fascinating history of the War of 1812
Choice
Thereafter, Americans reveled in a new sense of nationalism, embraced bold confidence, and demonstrated a patriotic ability to construct a nation in their image. This outstanding book captures the stunning images of the war and that transformation. Highly recommended.
Ausmarine
The author give a fair and balanced overview that is considerably enhanced by a large and high quality selection of illustrations... First rate.
Dennis Drabelle
In addition to the plentiful pictures, this book contains a thoughtful text.
—The Washington Post
The Barnes & Noble Review

Americans have had an abundance of ways to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War—books, conferences, ceremonies, reenactments. That war is unique in our history, many Americans would say, because it is the only one ever fought on American soil. But it isn't. In fact, 2012 will mark the 200th anniversary of a war that saw foreign troops occupy parts of the U.S., from Michigan to Maine to Louisiana, and put the White House and Capitol to the torch. Yet the War of 1812 has always been the Rodney Dangerfield of America's wars, doomed to get no historical respect. We will certainly spend more time in 2012 marking the sesquicentennial of Shiloh and Antietam than the bicentennial of Tippecanoe or Queenston Heights.

The Rockets' Red Glare: An Illustrated History of the War of 1812, by Donald R. Hickey and Connie D. Clark, offers a perfect way to redress the balance. Sized for the coffee table and full of color reproductions of paintings and maps and broadsides, it also offers an accessible narrative of what may well have been America's least necessary war.

By the summer of 1812, America's grievance against its former imperial master had been building for years. With the Napoleonic Wars raging in Europe, Great Britain put a blockade on neutral trade with the French- dominated Continent, which crippled American commerce. Even worse, as far as national pride was concerned, was the British practice of impressment—stopping American ships and seizing their crews to work on Royal Navy warships. These issues led Congress, urged on by President James Madison, to declare war on Britain on June 18th.

The Americans had not yet heard that, two days earlier, Parliament had revoked its blockade, thus taking a major cause of the war off the table. Had they known, the declaration of war would probably not have passed; one might say, then, that the War of 1812 began with a miscommunication. Indeed, within weeks the Americans were sending out peace feelers to the British. But the war would stretch on for two and a half years, with little glory on either side.

The Americans, urged on by "war hawks" like Henry Clay, thought that Britain would be forced to its knees by a quick invasion of Canada. But as Hickey and Clark show, the American army was not up to the job. Badly led and full of untrained, short-term recruits, it could make no headway against the tough British regulars who guarded the border. On the other hand, a series of naval victories for the U.S., on the Great Lakes and the Atlantic, fed national pride but did nothing to hurt Great Britain, then by far the world's greatest naval power.

When the war finally dragged to an end, the Treaty of Ghent provided for a return to the "status quo ante bellum"—that is, the whole fight was for nothing. Ironically, it was not until after the treaty was signed that a force led by Andrew Jackson won the only major American victory of the war, the Battle of New Orleans, in January 1815. At the end as in the beginning, confusion reigned supreme.

The oddest thing about the War of 1812, Hickey and Clark explain, is that such a small-scale, badly managed war produced so many of America's lasting patriotic symbols and slogans. The USS Constitution became "Old Ironsides" during its victory over HMS Guerriere; Captain Oliver Perry sailed into battle on Lake Erie under a flag emblazoned with "Don't Give Up the Ship, " and after defeating a British squadron he sent back the terse report, "We have met the enemy and they are ours." Uncle Sam was born during the War of 1812, probably as a result of "a growing number of manufactured goods that were stamped with the initials 'U.S., ' " though he would not become the familiar white-bearded old man until the 1870s. Finally, of course, the War of 1812 gave us our national anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner": the words come from a poem written by Francis Scott Key as he observed the unsuccessful British assault on Baltimore in 1814. If only for that reason, the War of 1812 deserves a place in our memory.

Adam Kirsch is a senior editor at The New Republic and a columnist for Nextbook.org. Reviewer: Adam Kirsch

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781421401553
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 9/29/2011
  • Series: Johns Hopkins Books on the War of 1812
  • Edition description: 20
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 993,810
  • Product dimensions: 8.90 (w) x 10.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Donald R. Hickey is a professor of history at Wayne State College. He has written widely on the War of 1812, including the books The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict, The War of 1812: A Short History, Don’t Give Up the Ship! Myths of the War of 1812, and, as coauthor, The War of 1812 in the Chesapeake: A Reference Guide to Historic Sites in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, the last also published by Johns Hopkins. Connie D. Clark is a consultant with Educational Service Unit #2, where she provides guidance and assistance for federally funded Teaching American History Grants. She is coauthor, with Professor Hickey, of Citizen Hamilton: The Wit and Wisdom of an American Founder.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)