Rock'n Roll Riot

Rock'n Roll Riot

     
 
Sometimes looks can deceive -- the picture of the Stoltz Brothers band makes them out to be the dorkiest would-be rock & rollers this side of the Schmenge Brothers, but their title track to this collection is a hot piece of rock & roll, straight-ahead, no holds barred and no quarter given. Most of the rest is like that as well, from Alan Barnicoat ("Savage") to the

Overview

Sometimes looks can deceive -- the picture of the Stoltz Brothers band makes them out to be the dorkiest would-be rock & rollers this side of the Schmenge Brothers, but their title track to this collection is a hot piece of rock & roll, straight-ahead, no holds barred and no quarter given. Most of the rest is like that as well, from Alan Barnicoat ("Savage") to the Rhythm Tones ("Baby Sue"), the String Kings ("Bloodshot"), and the Wynnewoods ("Is That Wrong"). Most of the material here was part of rock & roll's post-first-wave boom, meaning Elvis and Jerry Lee Lewis are really influential, and there are references made to the Memphis Flash in some of the lyrics; rockabilly is strongly in evidence as well, even though most of the artists here try for a fuller, more mainstream, commercial rock & roll sound, less southern and rural. There are also a lot of songs here about rock & roll, as the makers try to embrace the new sound in the easiest way possible. Carl Newman's "Rockin' and a Boppin'" may try a little too hard that way, but gets by on its frantic pacing. The point is that these boys mostly got it right from day one, to judge by what's here, even if the public and the radio stations didn't see it that way. Bill Taylor's lusty, confident, bracing "Little Jewell," Ric Cartey's "Scratching on My Screen," a savage, loud, raunchy piece of rockabilly with a great beat and a weird rhythm guitar sound way out front, and Jim Foley's wailing "Blues in the Morning" are the three diamonds in this collection waiting to be discovered, with R. Porter's "A Woman Can Make You Blue" and Eddie Skelton's smooth "Keep It Swinging" close behind. On the down side, Johnny Knight's raucous "Rock & Roll Guitar" disappoints on its guitar break. Frankie Dash's "Rock Rhythm Roll" is a throwback to swing-era R&B, only that kind of anthemic piece worked better with Black vocal groups chanting the keywords "rock," "rhythm," and "roll." Some of the rest is forgettable, and the producers may have bitten off more than they can chew by doing 30 songs a disc. As the final number here, Dennis Puckett's "By By Blues" is pretty lame, and has no excuse for being here.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/26/2000
Label:
Buffalo Bop
UPC:
4001043550046
catalogNumber:
55004
Rank:
313293

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