Rodney Stone

Rodney Stone

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by Arthur Conan Doyle
     
 

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Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Overview

Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940022902570
Publisher:
London : Smith, Elder
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
528 KB

Meet the Author

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ, DL (22 May 1859 - 7 July 1930) was an Irish-Scots writer and physician, most noted for creating the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes and writing stories about him which are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction.

Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle was born on 22 May 1859 at 11 Picardy Place, Edinburgh, Scotland.[6][7] His father, Charles Altamont Doyle, was English, of Irish Catholic descent, and his mother, Mary (née Foley), was Irish Catholic. His parents married in 1855.[8] In 1864 the family dispersed due to Charles's growing alcoholism and the children were temporarily housed across Edinburgh. In 1867, the family came together again and lived in squalid tenement flats at 3 Sciennes Place.[9] Doyle's father died in 1893, in the Crichton Royal, Dumfries, after many years of psychiatric illness.[10][11]

Supported by wealthy uncles, Doyle was sent to the Jesuit preparatory school Hodder Place, Stonyhurst, at the age of nine (1868-70). He then went on to Stonyhurst College until 1875. From 1875 to 1876, he was educated at the Jesuit school Stella Matutina in Feldkirch, Austria.[9] He later rejected the Catholic faith and become an agnostic.[12] He also later became a spiritualist mystic.

He is also known for writing the fictional adventures of a second character he invented, Professor Challenger, and for popularising the mystery of the Mary Celeste. He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
May 22, 1859
Date of Death:
July 7, 1930
Place of Birth:
Edinburgh, Scotland
Place of Death:
Crowborough, Sussex, England
Education:
Edinburgh University, B.M., 1881; M.D., 1885

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Rodney Stone 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The_Iceman More than 1 year ago
If you read very, very carefully and remain absolutely attentive to every passing paragraph, you'll realize that "Rodney Stone" is a historical mystery.

But, truth be told, the mystery is so subtle as to be almost non-existent and doesn't really form the majority of the story. More than anything else, "Rodney Stone" is a convincing and extremely entertaining historical fiction set early in England's Regency period. The topic is the brutal world of bare knuckles prize fighting and it's easy to see that Conan Doyle himself was a very enthusiastic fan with all of the detailed knowledge that an avid follower of the sport would have.

Rodney Stone, the son of a British naval man who, truth be told, spent most of his married years in Nelson's navy fighting off the continental menace of Napoleon Bonaparte, was to all intents and purposes raised by his mother. His uncle, Sir Charles Tregellis, is a wealthy London swell - a sophisticated gentleman, to be sure, but also a high-rolling gambler and a dandy with a full set of outrageously pretentious affectations who regularly vies with socialite Beau Brummel for the attentions of the fashion-oriented set with whom he associates. Tregellis "adopts" young Rodney taking him under his tutelage and attempts to turn him into a well-dress, well-mannered proper London gentleman. But Rodney is made of more earnest steadfast stuff and is much more interested in retaining his lifelong friendship with Boy Jim, the son of John Harrison, a former bare knuckles champion of England now working as a lowly blacksmith. Tregellis does his best to convince Rodney that Boy Jim is beneath his station and is not the sort of person that a young chap like Stone should associate with.

Using convincing story-telling, wonderful historical background about the Bonaparte wars, clear class distinctions, entertaining cameo appearances by dignitaries such as Horatio Nelson, Lady Emma Hamilton, Sheridan Fox, Beau Brummell and even the shallow Prince Regent (George IV), Conan Doyle has created a very solid period piece that describes Regency England and, in particular, the shadowy and, even then, illegal world of prize fighting with bare knuckles.

Oh yeah ... the mystery! Well, it's there and it gets solved and makes for a great way to close out the book but the history is the thing. As a long-time fan of Conan Doyle's Victorian style of writing as it was used in his Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger stories, I was especially pleased to have found and enjoyed this rather lesser known work.

Highly recommended.

Paul Weiss