Rodrick Rules (Diary of a Wimpy Kid Series #2) (Japanese Edition)

Overview

The highly anticipated sequel to the #1 NEW YORK TIMES bestselling book!

Secrets have a way of getting out, especially when a diary is involved.

Whatever you do, don?t ask Greg Heffley how he spent his summer vacation, because he definitely doesn?t want to talk about it.

As Greg enters the new school year, he?s eager to put the past three months behind him . . . and one event...

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Overview

The highly anticipated sequel to the #1 NEW YORK TIMES bestselling book!

Secrets have a way of getting out, especially when a diary is involved.

Whatever you do, don’t ask Greg Heffley how he spent his summer vacation, because he definitely doesn’t want to talk about it.

As Greg enters the new school year, he’s eager to put the past three months behind him . . . and one event in particular.

Unfortunately for Greg, his older brother, Rodrick, knows all about the incident Greg wants to keep under wraps. But secrets have a way of getting out . . . especially when a diary is involved.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules chronicles Greg’s attempts to navigate the hazards of middle school, impress the girls, steer clear of the school talent show, and most important, keep his secret safe.

 

F&P level: T

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Add a diary with an embarrassing summer secret and then stir with two brothers and you have the essential recipe of Rodrick Rules, already a hit installment in Jeff Kinney's cunningly clever Diary of a Wimpy Kid series. At the center of stew is Rodrick's younger brother Greg who is attempting ever so valiantly to somehow survive middle school with his dignity intact. This story of peer problems and adolescent hijinks gains new legs this month with the March 25th release of a comedy film based on the book.

Julie Just
The voice is pitch-perfect and the action recognizably elementary, and not too mean.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

Kinney's junior-high diarist returns to chronicle another year's worth of comic moments in this riotous sequel. Once again, school-related drama constitutes a good portion of Greg's subject matter, from an ongoing correspondence with a pen pal ("I'm pretty sure 'aquaintance' doesn't have a 'c' in it. You really need to work on your English," Greg replies to the French student's polite introduction) to mastering book reports by writing "exactly what the teacher wants to hear" ("There were a bunch of hard words in this book, but I looked them up in the dictionary so now I know what they mean"). As in the previous book, cartoons form part of the narrative, corroborating (or disproving) Greg's statements. He claims that kids with last names at the start of the alphabet are smartest, and a side-by-side comparison of prim über-nerd Alex Aruda and gap-toothed Christopher Ziegel drives the point home. Additionally, Kinney fleshes out the often testy relationships between Greg and his slacker older sibling, Rodrick, and his little brother, Manny (when Greg gets mad at Manny for shoving a cookie in his video game system, the toddler protests, "I'm ownwy thwee!" and offers a ball of tinfoil with toothpicks shoved through to apologize). The hilarious interplay between text and cartoons and the keen familial observations that set Diary of a Wimpy Kidapart are just as evident in this outing, and are just as likely to keep readers in stitches. Ages 8-up. (Feb.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Kinney's success as writer and cartoonist with the best-selling Diary of a Wimpy Kid is now followed by Diary #2, again about middle-schooler Greg, This time, Greg is at the mercy of his truly horrible teenage brother Roderick. Kinney is not judgmental. Greg and Roderick do anything they can get away with, without a thought for the feelings of others, and readers are left to draw their own conclusions. Dad and ever-vigilant Mom are largely clueless; at least, that's Greg's perception. What is the worst thing the brothers get up to? Probably Roderick's inviting his disreputable friends for an all-night party when Mom and Dad are away. (How could they trust Roderick with the house?) Poor Greg is sucked into the scheme and then blackmailed into cleaning up after the disaster. Greg has plenty of middle-school episodes of his own, like causing his friend Rowley to break his big toe or teaming up with magician Scotty for the Talent Show only to sabotage the act. The final entries of his diary recount how Greg saves Roderick with a last-minute science project (answering the question, "Do Plants Sneeze?") and achieves unexpected celebrity when he hides in the women's restroom (don't ask). When Mom reassures him that his classmates will know it was an "honest mistake," Greg sagely remarks: "So that just proves once and for all that Mom doesn't understand a THING about kids my age." Kinney's clever cartoons (too slick to have actually been done by Greg) are just as funny as the ones in Diary #1. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal

Gr 4-8- Hapless and hilarious Greg Heffley returns with another diary full of the minor irritations, major disasters, and occasional triumphs of a wimpy boy's middle school life. Kinney combines hand-written text with comical cartoons to present a character who is self-centered, sneaky, and dishonest, but also occasionally insightful and always very funny. Older brother Rodrick is his primary nemesis this time, partly because he threatens to spill Greg's embarrassing secret to the whole world. A nerdy best friend, a little brother who gets away with everything, and a bunch of clueless adults add significantly to Greg's problems. Readers, of course, will note that most of the narrator's troubles are self-inflicted, as when he wraps himself in toilet paper to avoid hypothermia in the boys' bathroom, does a disastrous job of pet-sitting, or decides to "wing it" for his school report on "The Amazing Moose." He's a character that readers can laugh at and empathize with at the same time. The line drawings that appear on every page play a large part in bringing Greg's world to life, providing humorous characterizations and details not mentioned in words. They also extend the appeal of the book to readers who are still a few years away from middle school themselves. Diary of a Wimpy Kid (Abrams, 2007) has been wildly popular, and this sequel should be an equally big hit with reluctant readers, especially boys, and anyone looking for a funny book.-Steven Engelfried, Multnomah County Library, OR

Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In a second set of entries-of a planned three, all first published in somewhat different form online in installments-slacker diarist Greg starts a new school year. After a miserable summer of avoiding swim-team practice by hiding out in the bathroom (and having to wrap himself in toilet paper to keep from freezing), he finally passes on the dreaded "cheese touch" (a form of cooties) to an unsuspecting new classmate, then stumbles through another semester of pranks and mishaps. On the domestic front, his ongoing wars with older brother Rodrick, would-be drummer in a would-be metal band called Loded Diper, share center stage with their mother's generally futile parenting strategies. As before, the text, which is done in a legible hand-lettered-style font, is liberally interspersed with funny line drawings, many of which feature punch lines in speech balloons. Though even less likable that Junie B. Jones, Greg is (well, generally) at least not actively malicious, and so often is he the victim of circumstance or his own schemes gone awry that readers can't help but feel empathy. This reasonably self-contained installment closes with a truce between the siblings. A temporary one, more than likely. (Illustrated fiction. 9-11)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9784591104644
  • Publisher: Poplar Publishing/Tsai Fong Books
  • Publication date: 9/28/2008
  • Language: Japanese
  • Series: Diary of a Wimpy Kid Series , #2
  • Edition description: Japanese-language Edition
  • Pages: 220
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeff Kinney

Jeff Kinney is an online game developer and designer and is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Diary of a Wimpy Kid. He spent his childhood in the Washington, D.C., area and moved to New England in 1995. Jeff lives in southern Massachusetts with his wife, Julie, and their two sons, Will and Grant.

Biography

All his life, Jeff Kinney wanted to be a cartoonist. As a student at the University of Maryland in the 1990s, he published his comic strip "Igdoof" in the college newspaper, but he soon discovered that succeeding in the real world as a syndicated cartoonist is no easy task. So, after school, he supported himself as a newspaper designer and computer programmer, while working out ideas for a children's book that combined cartoons with conventional storytelling.

Once he conceived the concept for Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Kinney devoted nearly six years to developing the storyline and artwork. Fashioned as a journal with appealing, expressive stick figure drawings on every page, Diary is narrated in the pitch-perfect (and hilariously deadpan) voice of a not-always-likeable but totally believable tweener named Greg Heffley. Poised to make the painful transition from elementary to middle school, Greg struggles with the usual preteen angst: bullies and cliques, annoying siblings and clueless parents, faithful friends and cute, unattainable girls.

Although Kinney never intended to publish his book online, when the opportunity arose to serialize Greg's adventures on Funbrain.com, he knew he'd found the perfect way to reach his target audience. In 2004, the comic strip began appearing in daily installments on the website. The feature was a huge hit, attracting thousands of hits a day. Moreover, the online version paved the way to Kinney's five-book deal with the publisher Harry N. Abrams.

Armed with fresh, new story lines, Kinney launched the print sequence in 2007. From the very first installment, entitled simply Diary of a Wimpy Kid, the series was a success -- especially with reluctant readers who found the diary-with-doodles format far more accessible than conventional books. Greg, with his hilarious antics, backfiring schemes, and totally unfiltered thoughts (his mom has agreed not to read what he writes!), has struck a responsive chord -- both with kids who identify with his growing pains and with grownups who vividly recall their own.

Good To Know

  • Jeff Kinney claims that he writes for kids because he believes the most interesting and funniest stories come from people's childhoods.

  • In an interview with familyeducation.com, Kinney was asked which he liked more: writing or drawing cartoons. He answered this way: " Both writing and drawing are a struggle for me. I am cursed with being a very slow illustrator, and this book requires at least 1,000 illustrations. So sometimes, the joy of illustrating is a bit diminished by the amount of time that illustrating takes. What I enjoy is seeing the words and illustrations come together on the page."

  • Kinney knew he'd made the grade when Diary of a Wimpy Kid was chosen to appear as a plot point on the popular Disney-produced preteen series Wizards of Waverly Place.

  • Kinney deliberately avoids putting pop culture references into his stories because he wants them to have a timeless feel. He hopes readers will be able to pick his books up 20 years from now and still be able to relate to themes.
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      1. Hometown:
        Southern Massachusetts
      1. Date of Birth:
        February 19, 1971
      2. Place of Birth:
        Maryland
      1. Education:
        University of Maryland
      2. Website:

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